PLATINUM2024

Clery Center

at the heart of campus safety

Fort Washington, PA   |  http://www.clerycenter.org

Mission

Working together with college and university communities to create safer campuses.

Notes from the nonprofit

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Clery Center at 484-580-8754. Thank you!

Ruling year info

1989

Executive Director

Ms. Jessica Mertz

Main address

501 Office Center Drive Suite 8

Fort Washington, PA 19034 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Security On Campus, Inc.

EIN

23-2485759

NTEE code info

Crime Prevention N.E.C. (I20)

Safety Education (M40)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (I01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Clery Center empowers colleges and universities to create safer campuses. We connect campus safety professionals with 30 years of experience, unparalleled expertise, and in-depth training, resources, and strategies to understand and implement the Clery Act. We guide institutions to exemplify the spirit of the law with a proactive commitment to campus safety and educate campus communities to know how the law protects them.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Comprehensive Campus Safety Training and Support

The colleges and universities we serve understand that a safe campus is critical to their institutions’ success. Clery Center's unique focus on both the letter and the spirit of the law gives institutions the tools they need to nurture the trust of their campus communities by creating a more transparent culture and an environment that encourages academic and emotional security. We offer a multitude of comprehensive training and educational options in-person and virtually, including our Clery Act Training Seminars, topic-focused webinars, workshops, on-demand training, and consulting services. Learn more: www.clerycenter.org/overview-of-training-services

Population(s) Served
Adults

In 2008, National Campus Safety Awareness Month (NCSAM) was unanimously approved by Congress to encourage a public conversation on important topics in violence prevention at our nation’s colleges and universities.

Our role with NCSAM at Clery Center has been simple: to develop free programs and resources that promote campus safety. In 2021 we launched a free virtual summit, bringing together campus safety practitioners and higher education leaders from around the country to share insight and experience through interviews, panels, and roundtable conversations with thought leaders and subject matter experts in the field of campus safety, spreading awareness, informing institutional policy, and effecting change.

More information about NCSAM is available online: www.clerycenter.org/ncsam

Population(s) Served
Adults

Through presentations and workshops, educational videos, outreach campaigns, networking opportunities, and policy work, Clery Center works to expand awareness and understanding of campus safety issues and promising practices with key stakeholders. Projects and initiatives in this category include the OVW Campus Grant Program, "We Don't Haze": Hazing Prevention and Education, Kristin's Krusade: A Dating Violence Prevention Initiative, and campus fire safety awareness. More information about these projects can be found at the Clery Center's website: www.clerycenter.org

Population(s) Served
Adults

Clery Center offers two types of membership: Institutional and Individual. Both Membership tiers connect campus safety professionals with ready-to-use materials, resources, and strategies to help guide them through understanding and implementing the provisions of the Clery Act. Clery Center guides institutions and individuals to exemplify the spirit of the law with a proactive commitment to campus safety. Piloted in 2013, the Membership program has over 260 members nationwide.

More information about Clery Center Membership, including a full list of member institutions and a summary of the program's impact is available online: www.clerycenter.org/membership

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Office on Violence Against Women 2010

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of free participants in conferences

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Academics

Related Program

National Campus Safety Awareness Month

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

What Guidestar calls "conferences" we measure as free online education and training via our annual webinar series, OVW Campus Grant Program, and National Campus Safety Awareness Month programming.

Number of paid participants in conferences

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Academics

Related Program

Comprehensive Campus Safety Training and Support

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

What Guidestar calls "conferences" we measure our paid educational opportunities, such as Clery Act Training Seminars and workshops.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Five strategic goals will direct our efforts and investments during 2020 – 2024. The goals, key objectives and strategic initiatives are designed to build upon Clery Center’s record of service and accomplishments, and ultimately to advance its efforts to improve campus safety for all.

I. Impact - Enhance our impact on improving campus safety and our ability to communicate about it.

II. Superior Experiences - Deliver superior experiences for all individuals, colleges, and universities that use our products and services.

III Business Model and Market - Update our business model and expand our reach.

IV. Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion - Build our capacity to operate and to lead in ways that are fully inclusive of and responsive to the broad spectrum of diversity in college and university communities.

V. Organizational Strength - Invest in our people and culture to maintain our strength.

Goal I: Impact
Enhance our impact on improving campus safety and our ability to communicate about it.

Key Objectives
1. Strengthen Clery Center’s overall identity and leadership position as broadly encompassing campus safety.
2. Strengthen Clery Center’s policy and advocacy work.
3. Leverage ongoing Initiatives.
4. Track and communicate about our impact and that of the Clery Act.
5. Evaluate and communicate about Clery Center’s work related to the OVW grants.

Goal II: Superior Experiences
Deliver superior experiences for all individuals, colleges, and universities that use our products and services.
Key Objectives
1. Expand and continually improve product and service offerings.
2. Implement strategies to retain current members.
3. Expand our reach to prospective members and convert them to members.
4. Invest in technology.

Goal III: Business Model and Market
Update our business model and expand our reach.
1. Update our business and fundraising model to increase revenue.
2. Build our market and reach.

Goal IV: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
Build our capacity to operate and to lead in ways that are fully inclusive of and responsive to the broad spectrum of diversity in college and university communities.
1. Strengthen Clery Center’s readiness to center diversity, equity, and inclusion in its work.
2. Implement strategies to embed diversity, equity and inclusion in every aspect of Clery Center.

Goal V: Organizational Strength
Invest in our people and culture to maintain our strength.
1. Invest in staff.
2. Invest in the Board of Directors.
3. Maintain a healthy organizational culture.

Strategic initiatives for each goal's key objectives can be found in the full strategic plan document.

The organization uses internal and external resources to make progress on its strategic plan, with a specific focus on capacity building through technology and additional staffing to ensure that Clery Center's critical programs can scale effectively.

Internally, Clery Center has a dedicated staff and board who invest time and resources into implementing and evaluating programs and activities. Clery Center has invested in a dedicated staff role focused on technology and data, helping the organization implement a cloud-based CRM solution to better track program activities, constituent needs, and outcomes.

Externally, Clery Center maintains partnerships with a number of key players in the fields of campus safety, victim advocacy, policy making, and higher education. The organization uses these partnerships to identify expertise and capacity to more effectively and efficiently deliver programs and services that help campus communities become safer through education and training, policy, and collaboration.

Clery Center's strategic plan has been updated and adopted as of January 2020 and will assign staff responsibilities for monitoring progress on the plan's implementation. Real-time dashboards and improved engagement analysis will help Clery Center determine the scope, impact, and ongoing needs of its programs. More information about Clery Center's operations, strategic plan, and programs is available on the organization's website: www.clerycenter.org.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Clery Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Clery Center

Board of directors
as of 02/29/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Sheilah Vance

Law Offices of Sheilah D. Vance, Esquire

Term: 2021 -

Constance Clery

Mary B Swanson

Andrew R. Cagnetta

Transworld Business Brokers

Anne Seymour

National Center for Victims of Crime

Gary DeVercelly

Julie DeVercelly

Roger Carolin

SCP Partners

Sheilah D. Vance, Esq.

Law Offices of Sheilah D. Vance, Esquire

Kevin Connors

BTIG

Pearl Kim

Beth Riley, M.D.

Maureen S. Rush

Raquel Kennedy Bergen, Ph.D.

Saint Joseph's University

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/29/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/19/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.