BAKER INDUSTRIES INC

aka Baker   |   Malvern, PA   |  www.bakerindustries.org

Mission

Employ those who have the most difficulty in getting and holding jobs. Teach the work ethic through real work experience. Act as a transition step toward gaining and maintaining outside employment. Help those who are unable to move on reach their highest level of achievement.

Ruling year info

1990

President

Mr. Richard L. Bevan

Main address

184 Pennsylvania Ave

Malvern, PA 19355 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-2560245

NTEE code info

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Employment Training (J22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Baker Industries provides a work training/rehabilitation program, addressing the needs of hundreds of low income individuals who have the most difficulty in getting and holding jobs. Specifically, Baker focuses on four groups of low-income “vulnerable adults": (1) people with disabilities (2) those with substance use disorder (3) returning citizens and (4) homeless individuals. The need that our workforce development program fulfills continues to grow every year as there just are not enough programs available to reach out to the four segments of the disadvantaged vulnerable adult population that we try to assist.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Baker Industries Unique Workforce Development Program

Our philosophy is to provide real work and real compensation in a caring atmosphere that builds self-esteem and prepares workers for main stream jobs in the community. We operate two facilities which employ roughly 100 individuals and we accept no government subsidy.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Incarcerated people

Where we work

Awards

2012 Top Rated Award 2012

Great NonProfits

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Men and boys, Adults

Related Program

Baker Industries Unique Workforce Development Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Work is the engine that drives our program - real work from some 80 customers. Work is what enables us to reach out and help more low-income vulnerable adults.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Men and boys, Adults

Related Program

Baker Industries Unique Workforce Development Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our most important metric is the number of program participants that move on to become productive citizens

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Goals for 2021: Our goals for 2020 were consistent with our history and mission. However, they were revised in March of that year to acknowledge the tremendous impact of the Covid-19 crisis. We halted our day-to-day production in late March, in alignment with state orders. During this hiatus, we continued to maintain our facilities, raise funds and most importantly - stayed deeply connected to our constituents - program participants, donors, and customers.
For 2021, our goals are as follows:
• Execute our mission statement
• Serve 150-175 participants.
• Support 25+ adults in achieving better employment, hopefully at a living wage level. As of 10/26/21 we have had 31 participants leave us for better employment.
• Continue to maintain health & safety protocols in accordance with CDC pandemic guidelines.
• Increase fundraising by 5% over prior year.
• Restore customer revenue to 90% of pre-COVID-19 levels.
• Continue to generate a modest surplus from our operations and investments.
We will measure our impact based on achievement of the above goals, with a focus on serving as many participants as possible and supporting as many job placements as possible. We remain ready to exceed these goals if the public health and economic environment improve sufficiently.

Our program strategy to meet our outcome goals (# participants served and # participants progressing to better employment) is to continue to refine our model of real work experience and job readiness support.

Our increased focus on job readiness support comes from decades of experience working with individuals who have often not held a “real" job in many years. Life skills are as important as work skills. Our newest program addresses capabilities like decision making, critical thinking, dealing with ambiguity and other factors that build resilience and confidence. On-site coaching and counseling provide 1:1 support as individuals navigate personal challenges. We also focus on the more tactical skills related to job search, interviewing and successful behaviors when starting a new job. Our goal is to improve our “batting average" and see a higher percentage of individuals who enter our program progress to better employment.

Our donor strategy is focused on continuing to earn the trust of existing sources while expanding our network of individuals and foundations that invest in our program. Our mission has never been more relevant as the Philadelphia community struggles to unlock the employment value in the very populations we serve. We are increasingly seeking civic and corporate partnerships to address the economic and social opportunities inherent in better integration of hard to employ adults into the workplace.

Finally, we are devoting significant senior management resources to our customer strategy of improved account management and new business acquisition to reach our budgeted revenue goal. Specifically, we are investing in stronger business partnerships with selected customers where we can provide excellent service and value in return for strong collaboration with our team. Because our participants face many challenges, we do best with business partners who work with us on process improvement, scheduling, work flow, etc. When these partnerships extend to temp assignments and job opportunities, it is even more of a win/win.

Our three-pronged strategy can be summarized as follows: improve the participant, donor and customer experience to expand our proven program to more hard-to-employ adults and create stronger communities.

We have a very strong management team that has come from the for-profit sector. We are a Social Enterprise, and while some tout social enterprise as the new, cutting edge approach to social services, at Baker Industries, we have been rather quietly operating a successful, self-sustaining workforce development program using business methods for over 35 years. We have two facilities with a total of 105,000 square feet. We currently have approximately 100 individuals in our program and could easily accomodate more than twice that amount if we had the work to justify them.

Recognizing the challenges that our participants face outside our program workplace; we continually seek to partner in the communities we serve. We have made a concerted effort to expand our network and partnerships in center-city Philadelphia. – in most instances, exposing our participants to an entirely new world. We believe in the power of partnership and will continue to build relationships that help serve our participants and our community. A partial list includes:
• The Philly Manufacturing Growth Network – “off the sideline – into the workforce” – a group of Philadelphia Manufacturers working specifically with Baker to provide employment opportunities for our program participants. (WWW.PHLMFG.com)
• Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce – we are actively participating in the Chambers Roadmap for Growth.
• Philadelphia Re-entry Project – we are a member and have participated in multiple panel discussions and working groups to improve the re-entry of returning citizens from incarceration to work and the community.
• Wilma Theater – creative partner with their Portable Studio in our new enhanced job readiness program.
• Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts & the Barnes Foundation – creative partners in our enhanced job readiness program.
• Philadelphia Works – working with CareerLink and other career planning services to support our participants in their search for employment.
• Philadelphia R.I.S.E. Program – working with them to promote the Fair Chance Hiring Initiative.
• Temple University School of Criminal Justice – partnership on research study on reentry.
• Connection Training Services – providing job search and networking support to Baker participants.
• Family Services – Montgomery County – providing opportunities for women transitioning from incarceration.
• Timothy School – students at this school for disabled young adults spend time at Baker gaining work experience.
• Corporate Partners – terrific volunteer and financial support from Bryn Mawr Trust, CubeSmart, Vanguard, OSI Soft, SEI, BNY Mellon, and Trident, Fox-Roach Charities.
• School & Alumni Groups – in normal years, we have multiple groups volunteer to work for all or part of a day from: Philadelphia Kappa Kappa Gamma Alumni Group, Malvern Prep, Friends Central, and Villa Maria Academy. 2020 was certainly not a normal year – 2021 is certainly better.

The need that our workforce development program fulfills continues to grow every year as there just are not enough programs available to reach out to the four segments of the disadvantaged vulnerable adult population that we try to assist.

We take great pride when Bakerites are able to move into the “real" workforce. Such a transition is not only a testament to the success of our training program but to the hard work, dedication and perseverance each individual has invested in themselves in an attempt to create a better life. However, although we consider these figures when evaluating the effectiveness of our program, we believe that the full impact of our mission is immeasurable. Every Bakerite we welcome to Baker Industries, each hour of work we are able to offer to them makes a difference to their lives and to the lives of people around them. The skills and the experiences with which Baker Industries provides each participant, not to mention the constant source of income, are the truly impactful elements of our program; benefits that are in some ways less tangible than counting the number of graduating Bakerites, but that are by no means any less valuable. Consequently, our evaluation process usually requires a consideration of all the different stages of our program, from participants' first days at Baker Industries to their final farewells.

Our decades long impact in the community is clear. Over 11,000 low/no/ income vulnerable adults have benefitted by participating in our program. Over 2,000 individuals have progressed to better employment and an opportunity to break the cycle of poverty and dependence that has defined so many of their lives. Families and communities have been strengthened. Baker Industries changes lives.

We will continue to improve and expand our program - our staff has recently undergone extensive training in the principles of trauma-informed care as well as Mental health First Aid. We have also expanded our job coaching program to ensure that our participants are job-ready. In addition, we have recently hired an HR specialist to help us to get more individuals into our program

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We provide hope and opportunity for low/no income vulnerable adults – individuals challenged with disability, parole/probation, substance use disorder, and homelessness. Our purpose is to integrate these individuals into the workforce through regular work at one of our two industrial facilities in an accepting and trauma-informed environment. Program participants are paid a real wage while learning fundamental work and collaboration skills and participate (while still getting paid) in workshops, counseling, and coaching designed to foster self-esteem and job readiness. On average we engage approximately 200 individuals each year from the Philadelphia region in our program. Over our history an average of 49 participants progress to better work in the regular economy.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently realized that while we were certainly helping our participant obtain better employment, we needed to do more to help them maintain that employment. We then launched an innovative Job Readiness Program. Based on trauma-informed principles, the 24-week intensive program helps individuals build critical thinking skills, increase self-awareness, and enhance communication skills through workshops and partnerships with leading creative arts organizations like the Wilma Theater, Barnes Foundation, and PA Academy of Fine Arts. All training, coaching, and counseling is delivered “on the clock” with participants fully paid so there is no conflict between their development and earning an income.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Baker Industries is a diverse and inclusive 41-year-old nonprofit workforce development program, and we believe in total transparency. The feedback we receive and the changes that result from it enable us to better understand the challenges that our participants face. It has clearly enabled us to have a better relationship with them as we adjust our programs to better serve them. A prime example of this is our ongoing staff and management training in Trauma Informed Supervision.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is extremely difficult to stay in contact with out successful Alumni - our primary source of info,

Financials

BAKER INDUSTRIES INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

BAKER INDUSTRIES INC

Board of directors
as of 11/24/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Richard ill

Triumph Group Founder

Term: 2017 - 2020


Board co-chair

Mr. John Thacher

Former President, Baker Industries

Term: 2017 - 2020

Charles Baker

Baker Co-founder

Richard Ill

Board Chair

Djoerd Hoekstra

Retired Exec

Vijay Aggarwal

VaxiGenix

Karen Cruickshank

T-E School Board

Daniel Sidlo

Vanguard

Matthew Kurimay

Vanguard

Rich Bevan

Baker

Alfred Flowers

Connection Training Services

Wendy Brooks

Louise Baker

Baker Co-founder

John Thacher

Former Pres - Baker

Jennifer Brower

Fulton Bank

Miguel Alban

Bryn Mawr Trust

Andrew Camerota

Bryn Mawr Trust

Alison Eichert

Bryn Mawr Trust

Chandler Hoopes

Commonwealth Capital

Christopher Metz

Compendium Pathology

Anita Leto

BHHS - Fox & Roach

Trupert Ortlieb

SRA

Brook Gardner

Gardner/Fox

Glenn Dever

Coho Partners

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/16/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.