PLATINUM2024

The Bridge Family Center, Inc.

Every Family. Every Child. Every Time.

aka The Bridge   |   West Hartford, CT   |  www.bridgefamilycenter.org

Mission

Formed in 1969 to help youth engaged in high-risk behaviors, the Bridge today is a comprehensive, regional nonprofit agency offering a broad range of services to children and families in Greater Hartford. We have 39 residential beds for young people; four mental health clinics that serve children, families, and adults; a Teen Center; a Mosaic Parenting Center for families working towards reunification, and a nationally recognized Family Resource Center. Last year, we served more than 9,000 children and families. Our mission is to foster the courage and strength in children and families to meet life's challenges and build fulfilling lives.

Ruling year info

1969

Executive Director

Ms. Margaret A. Hann

Main address

1022 Farmington Ave

West Hartford, CT 06107 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-7013563

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Family Services (P40)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Bridge is a proven community leader when it comes to offering a safe haven for children, youth, and families in crisis, and we play a key role in examining opportunities for prevention-focused efforts. Last year, we served approximately 8,500 young people and families through three primary program areas: Youth and Family Services, Residential Services, and Family Resource Centers. Because of our time-tested level of expertise in youth and family support, we continue to be recognized as a vital, effective resource for children and adolescents in the Greater Hartford area. Since 1979, we have served as the West Hartford Youth Service Bureau, allowing us to work simultaneously on prevention and intervention throughout the West Hartford public and private schools. Furthermore, the number of clients demanding our mental health counseling and Family Resource Center services continues to increase.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth and Family Services

The Bridge serves as the Youth Service Bureau for the Town of West Hartford and provides many services to the surrounding region as well.It offers numerous intervention and prevention services including school-based services, positive youth development activities, leadership development programs for middle-school students, a drop-in Teen Center for high school students, mentoring, and parenting programs.In FY 2023, approximately 1,470 youth were served.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children

The Bridge operates a nine-bed Youth Shelter/Short-Term Assessment and Respite (STAR) home in West Hartford for girls and a six-bed STAR home for boys in Hartford and Wolcott aged 11 to 18 whose lives are in crisis. The Bridge operates a Transitional Living Apartment program in Manchester that assists ten young men ages 16 to 21 in developing the skills necessary to live independently. Other Independent Living Programs include Community Based Life Skills, Community Housing Assistance, and Youth in Transition. In FY 2023, 223 youths received assistance from our STAR and Independent Living Programs, three-quarters of whom were minorities from Hartford, Manchester, New Britain, Waterbury, and other urban communities.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

The Bridge's Family Resource Center (FRC) is based at Charter Oak International Academy in West Hartford, with programs at three otherWest Hartford elementary schools. FRC programs promote family involvement and the social and academic competence of children through a variety of programs including parent education, early childhood and family literacy, summer preschool, developmental screenings, family counseling, after-school learning and enrichment activities, before- and after-school daycare for preschoolers, social skills groups, and early childhood intervention programs. The FRC was named a "School of the 21st Century--National Demonstration Site" by the Yale University Zigler Center for Child Development and was selected by "Working Mother Magazine" as one of the ten best programs in the country for working parents. In FY 2023, 960 children and families participated in Family Resource Center programs.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Adults

Through substance abuse prevention education, including positive alternatives to drugs and alcohol; the Build No Fences Award (given annually to people in the community who work cooperatively on youth issues); and the Every Family newsletter (providing parent support and resources and information about positive family activities), the Bridge serves as a conduit for fostering open and positive discussion among various segments of the West Hartford community.In FY 2023, approximately 5,700 people participated in community activities.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents

The Bridge provides affordable counseling services for a broad range of concerns for children, youth, and families from throughout greater Hartford, with offices in West Hartford, Avon, and Rockville. The Bridge is licensed as an Outpatient Psychiatric Clinic for Children by the Connecticut Department of Children and Families. Bridge therapists address a variety of concerns affecting children and families including depression and anxiety, coping with divorce, uncontrollable anger, grief, defiance, and self-destructive behaviors. In FY2023, 540 children and 244 adults were seen in our counseling centers.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

The Mosaic Parenting Center provides structured support and coaching during family visitation sessions for parents who are working on reunification after a child has been removed from their home. Working with trained coaching staff, parents identify issues they wish to improve in their relationships with their children. Through guidance and instruction in child development, anger management, self control, and other topics, coaching staff help parents change their behaviors with their children and in their personal lives. In FY2023, 129 children and 117 parents were served at the Mosaic Parenting Center.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

Parent Educator of the Year (Robin Drago) 2005

Parents as Teachers National Center

Youth Services Administrator of the Year (Patricia Doherty) 2003

Connecticut Youth Services Association

Citizen of the Year 2018

West Hartford

Award of Excellence 2023

CT. Assoc. for Infant Mental Health

Affiliations & memberships

National Association of Social Workers 2005

Connecticut League of Children 2010

Connecticut Non Profit Alliance 2000

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of staff who are engaged in Equity, Diversity and Inclusion initiative.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Youth and Family Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

An EDI committee and subcommittee of stakeholders was formed in 2021 and goals and objectives were developed and implemented in 2022.

Number of staff who are trained to facilitate Aggression Replacement Therapy Groups

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Residential Services

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our residential programs have 13 program managers and shift supervisors who are trained to facilitate the Aggression Replacement Therapy groups.

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Goal is for 100% participation from Board members in annual giving.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Continue to grow our capacity to provide Outpatient Mental Health Services.
2. Deepen our outreach into the communities we serve through our Family Resource Center, adding additional daycare options to meet the needs of parents who work non-traditional hours.
3. Expand our discretionary funding base in order to meet the growing needs of the children and families we serve in this challenging economic environment.

We serve the members of our community throughout every stage of their lives. Whether we meet people as babies at our FRC, or in their senior years through our Counseling Centers, we are continually assessing our community to see where the needs are, where we can bolster our prevention efforts, and where intervention is necessary. In short, our work is both broad and deep in helping people move meaningfully from one stage of their lives to another. It is through our program areas that we assess our community's greatest needs and determine the most effective strategies for meeting our goals. Our program areas are as follows:
Youth and Family Services: counseling, support groups, positive youth development, school-based programs, mentoring, and the West Hartford Teen Center.
Counseling Services: Outpatient Psychiatric Clinic for children, adults, and families, 4 counseling centers in West Hartford, Avon and Rockville
Residential Services: four youth shelters/Short-Term Assessment and Respite (STAR) Homes in Connecticut, the Moving On Project transitional living apartments, Independent Living (Community Life Skills, Community Housing Assistance, and Youth in Transition).
Family Resource Centers: parent education, early and family literacy, summer preschool, developmental screenings, family counseling, parent leadership training, after-school learning and enrichment activities, before- and after-school daycare for preschoolers, social skills groups, and early childhood intervention programs at four West Hartford elementary schools.
Mosaic Parenting Center: family reunification, coaching, early childhood and parenting education

The Bridge has an expert leadership team and Board of Directors. Our Executive Director (ED) has been strongly at the helm for 24 years and been with the organization for a total of 36 years. Most members of the leadership team have been working successfully in their roles for upwards of 20 years, and we have highly regarded program directors in place. Our Board of Directors is a respected group of professionals who maintain proper governance procedures and receive ongoing board training and support.

1. Provided deeper level of counseling and therapy services through our licensed Outpatient Psychiatric Clinic for Children (OPCC). In 2022, the Bridge opened a fourth counseling center in response to the increase in demand for therapeutic services.
2. Expanded our Family Resource Center programming to serve more children and families.
3. Opened our Mosaic Parenting Center in 2022 to provide coaching and counseling for parents who are working towards reunification with their children.
4. Recognized for our West Hartford Youth Shelter by the Connecticut Department of Children and Families (DCF) as the model for its STAR Homes--a great honor that exemplifies the reputation of the Bridge in working with runaway and homeless youth.
5. Recognized statewide and nationally for our Youth and Family Services work by the Connecticut Youth Services Association and for our Family Resource Center (FRC) by the Parents as Teachers National Center, Working Mother magazine, and the Yale Zigler Center for Child Development and Social Policy.
Key Directions:
1. We are working to increase our capacity to meet the growing mental healthcare needs of adults, teens, and children in our community. In 2022 we opened a fourth counseling center.
2. We are working on strategies to support children and teens requiring residential services as the Connecticut Department of Children and Families decreases its dependency on congregant care.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome

Financials

The Bridge Family Center, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Bridge Family Center, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 05/08/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Peter Macdonald

Jason C. Goddard

Law Offices of Jason Goddard

Shrina B. Faldu

Gfeller Laurie LLP

Karen L. List

University of Connecticut School of Education

Judith A. Bierly

Retired Bridge Family Center Executive

Christopher L. Magendantz

The Travelers

Kathleen Christensen

CT Wealth Management

Peter Macdonald

AIG

Viviann M. Rubin, MD

Retired Pediatrician

Michele Maresca

Robinson + Cole

Robert Laurie

Gfeller, Laurie LLC

Stacey L. Samuel

The Travelers

Kim Ambroise

West Hartford Public Schools

Carlos Badiola

Attorney

Heather Clifford

Consultant

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/8/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/20/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.