Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee

Nashville, TN   |  mentorakid.org

Mission

Mission: Create and support one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth.
Vision: All youth achieve their full potential.
 
Accountability Statement: By partnering with parents/guardians, volunteers, and others in the
community we are accountable for each child in our program achieving:- Higher aspirations, greater confidence and better relationships
- Avoidance of risky behaviors
- Educational success

Ruling year info

1970

Principal Officer

Mrs. Melissa Hudson-Gant

Main address

1704 Charlotte Avenue, Suite 130

Nashville, TN 37203 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Buddies of Nashville

EIN

23-7056024

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee (BBBSMT) serves high-need youth with caring adult mentors. Last year we served 1,013 children, the majority facing adversity such as racial disparities, poverty, and trauma, including parental incarceration and crime victimization. Despite their increased need for mentoring, these youth are less likely to have access to a mentor than their more affluent peers. BBBSMT strives to close that mentoring gap by serving more high-need youth with caring adult mentors. We do this because the one-to-one attention from a caring adult mentor has been shown to increase self-confidence, educational achievement and expectations, positive decision-making and engagement in protective behaviors. According to the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, the number 1 protective factor in overcoming adversity is the presence of a caring and invested adult. 90% of our Littles say that their Big is that person for them.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Based Program

Caring volunteer adult role models make a commitment to spend 6-8+ hours each month for a minimum of one year in a one-to-one mentoring relationship with a child who can benefit from a mentor. The match is expected to spend consistent time together in the community, sharing activities such as library or museum visits, ball games, community service, sharing a meal and other everyday activities. The child and the volunteer determine their activities with guidance from the professional staff and taking into consideration the goals set by the parent, child and mentor. Community-Based Mentoring serves youth in Nashville/Davidson County, TN, and the contiguous counties of Rutherford, Wilson, Williamson, Sumner, Robertson, Cheatham and Dickson.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

In the School-Based program, volunteers make a commitment to spend one hour each week in a one-to-one mentoring relationship with their Little Brother or Little Sister at the child’s school. Volunteers often come from universities or the corporate community. One School-Based program, High School Bigs, uses high school students as mentors for elementary or middle school youth.
The Site-Based program is very similar to the School-Based program, except the matches meet in an after-school facility such as a community center or Family Resource Center.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

The Amachi program provides mentors for children with incarcerated parents, with many of the mentors coming from the faith-based community. We work to ensure that children and youth impacted by incarceration have the opportunity to realize and reach their potential. Children are served in both the Community-Based and Site/School-Based programs. Approximately 20-25% of youth served each year have an incarcerated family member.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Incarcerated people

MentorU connects high school students and working professionals through the creation of professionally-supported, one-to-one mentoring relationships focused on college and career readiness. Through their relationships with their mentors, Littles develop workplace skills, solidify post-high school plans, and gain access to career-advancing opportunities and networks.

Mentor from wherever you are. Curriculum-led mentor/youth communication is facilitated through a secure online platform with three face-to-face meetings throughout the year. MentorU began in Middle Tennessee in 2017 at Antioch High School, and is a great option for prospective volunteers who routinely travel for work or have staggered schedules of availability. In 2020, the program is expanding to serve youth at Dickson County's most rural high school, Creekwood High.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

Ours Sports Buddies program develops one-to-one mentoring friendships between an adult and a child through participatory and spectator sporting events. Activities are designed to deepen mentoring relationships while supporting self-confidence, goal setting, collaboration, skill development, and healthy lifestyles. Matches meet 2 times a month and commit to 6 months together. Activities are planned, facilitated, and monitored by Sports Buddies staff.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) 2004

ANE (Association of Nonprofit Executives) 2005

Center for Nonprofit Management Excellence Network 2004

Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce 2005

Nashville Prevention Partnership 2005

United Way Member Agency 1998

Williamson County Chamber of Commerce 2006

Alignment Nashville 2005

Mt. Juliet Chamber of Commerce 2005

Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce 2005

Donelson Hermitage Chamber of Commerce 2014

Association of Junior Leagues International 2012

Nashville Rotary Club 2014

CABLE 2012

Robertson County Chamber of Commerce 2014

Urban Land Institute - Member 2015

Cheatham County Chamber of Commerce 2014

Nashville Area LGBTQ Chamber 2018

Nashville Area Hispanic Chamber of Commerce 2014

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

BBBSMT has been successfully facilitating one-to-one mentoring relationships for children since 1969, building the next generation of citizens and stronger communities. Today, we remain focused on supporting caring adults (Bigs) walking beside individual children (Littles), helping them build resiliency from the adversity in their lives, find their talents and reach their potential. Following evidence-based national standards and practices for youth mentoring ensures high-quality programing and outcomes that are among the highest in the country.

Research shows that BBBS mentoring programs have real, meaningful outcomes for children. BBBS mentoring produces positive outcomes because success in life requires both academic and social/emotional competencies. One-to-one mentoring is a unique intervention for youth facing adversity because it addresses both types of competencies by focusing on the whole child: social skills/relationship development, personal/family concerns, emotional development, academic expectations and attitudes, and modeling of life skills (e.g., decision-making, goal-setting, educational aspirations, seeking out protective behaviors). When students improve in these areas, their likelihood of success increases.

What this program means to individual students was crystallized for us through an exchange between a BBBSMT social worker and a middle school-aged Little Brother:

Social Worker: “What do you like best about your Big Brother?”
Little Brother: “He sees potential in me when others don't.”

It is our mission to find the potential in each child and nurture it, by providing a mentor to stand with and support youth as they find their talents and strengths. Through this individualized attention, change happens. Students move forward toward success, one step at a time.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America has been providing mentoring services for more than 100 years, and the Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring model we employ is the national gold standard. This one-to-one mentoring model promotes emotional support, forms positive social skills, and cultivates protective behaviors as well as feelings of safety and security. It enhances academic skills and produces greater positive relationships with both family and peers. Research has consistently shown that overall, youth enrolled in BBBS programs are less likely to begin using illegal drugs, alcohol, and are less likely to skip school than their peers who are not in a one-to-one mentoring relationship through Big Brothers Big Sisters. Thorough volunteer screening, training, and ongoing agency supervision of matches set Big Brothers Big Sisters apart from other mentoring services. Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring is an evidence-based practice, recognized nationally in the federal Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention's Model Programs Guide and in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee (BBBSMT) serves youth facing adversity with caring adult mentors. Last year we served 1,013 children, the majority facing adversity such as racial disparities, poverty, and trauma, including parental incarceration and crime victimization. Despite their increased need for mentoring, these youth are less likely to have access to a mentor than their more affluent peers. BBBSMT strives to close that mentoring gap by serving more high-need youth with caring adult mentors.

Recent results:
- Of the 1,013 children served in 2019: 90% of the children received free/reduced lunches at school; 78% resided in non-two-parent homes; 85% were minority youth; 23% had a parent in prison.
- Continued to achieve positive results in match quality in 2019, with mentors and youth rating the quality of their relationships at 4.02 on a 5.0 scale.
- Achieved positive developmental outcomes for children in 2019, with 96.3% of youth improving or sustaining on key assets measured by the nationally developed Youth Outcomes Survey.
- Recognized by BBBS of America for the 7th year in a row as a 2019 Quality Award winner, ranking in the top 12% of all BBBS affiliates.

2019 Accomplishments:
-Served 1,013 children.
-Achieved an average match length of 36 months for community-based, and 20 months for site-based mentoring.
-Achieved average Strength of Relationship survey scores of 4.02 on a 5.0 scale, indicating strong & close relationships.
-96% of youth served maintained or improved on developmental assets related to educational expectations, emotional well-being, and social capital.
-Received a national Quality Award from BBBS of America for the 7th year in a row, ranking us in the top 10-12% of all BBBS agencies.
-MentorU, now its own program distinct from Site-Based mentoring, added a new class at Antioch High School. We negotiated the opening of a new site at Dickson County's most rural high school, Creekwood High, which began enrollment this fall. We are currently working to expand the program to Robertson County Schools. In 2019, we served 102 students through MentorU.
-Developed a comprehensive 2-year training plan for both staff and volunteers that includes trainings on implicit bias, cultural humility, cultural competence for specific communities, and trauma-informed work.
-Developed a new 2020-2023 Strategic Plan that focuses on increasing access to high-quality mentoring, increasing board diversity, diversifying funding and investing in strategic marketing, and investing in staff and their professional development.

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Middle Tennessee

Board of directors
as of 12/02/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Missy Acosta

Delta Dental

Term: 2020 - 2021

Missy Acosta

David Bailey

Jack Baxter

David Braemer

Anne Corrao

Dennis Georgatos

Chad Greer

Anders Hall

Amanda Henley

Kelly Hodges

Grant Kinnett

Allen McDonald

Ross Pepper

Cher Porties

Becky Sharpe

Curtiss Sullivan

Rachel Thomasson

Alex Tolbert

Erica Vick

Terry Vo

Brian Whisnant

Cynthia Whitfield-Story

Lisa Berg

Sheena Jones-Coofer

Brandon Corbin

James Hallock

Chris Huskey

Tom Lampe

Chris Miree

Scott Romine

Edward Rucker

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/2/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/02/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.