ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION COMMITTEE OF WEST MARIN

Protecting WILD West Marin Since 1971

aka EAC   |   Point Reyes Station, CA   |  www.eacmarin.org

Mission

MISSION
Protect and sustain the unique lands, waters, and biodiversity of West Marin.

VISION
Our work strives to provide long-term protection and conservation of the unique ecosystems and rural communities of West Marin, and serves as a foundation of environmental protection for future generations.

Ruling year info

1986

Executive Director

Morgan Patton

Main address

PO Box 609

Point Reyes Station, CA 94956 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-7115368

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation and Management (C32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our work strives to provide long-term protection and conservation of the unique ecosystems and rural communities of West Marin (7 coastal communities in Marin County), and serves as a foundation of environmental protection for future generations.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Coastal Planning, Protection and Engagement

California's coastline is home to three national marine sanctuaries which include over 10,500 square miles of protected area, and the California Coastal National Monument includes 2,272 miles of protected area. California has 124 marine protected areas, which makes up 16 percent of the California coastal zone.

Marin County is a zone of extremely high biodiversity and endemism, and includes some of the most biologically significant coastal resources in the world. West Marin is home to three national park units (including Point Reyes National Seashore, the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), and the Muir Woods National Monument), three state parks and miles of open space. GGNRA is home to 35 rare, threatened and endangered species, and the Seashore is home to over 50.

The coastal zone is defined by the Coastal Act and generally extends inland 1,000 yards from the mean high tide line of the sea. This zone is essential to support healthy marine life. The Marin County coastal zone consists of wetlands, lagoons, seagrass beds, reefs, and shallow bays which serve as nurseries or feeding areas for most coastal and oceanic species. Protection of these important coastal resources is part of EAC's mission. We work on these issues through wildlifelife protection, through the local coastal plan, climate change projects and more.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Activists

Marin County contains some of the most ecologically diverse and unique landscapes in the world. Many serve as the last refuges and critical habitat for populations of native plants and animals. For example, the Golden Gate National Recreation Area is home to 35 rare, threatened and endangered species, and the Point Reyes National Seashore is home to over 50.

As part of EAC's mission we work to protect the immense biodiversity of West Marin including the local wildlife and habitats through advocacy, engagement and city wide planning. Maintaining species biodiversity is key to thriving ecosystems. Our work strives to provide long-term protection of the unique ecosystems of West Marin, and serves as a foundation of environmental protection for future generations. Part of EAC's initial and continued focus is to protect West Marin’s unique flora and fauna through education and advocacy. Our work as been successful in saving wilderness in Drakes Estero, saving the Tomales Dunes, and banning jet skis from Tomales Bay out to the Farallones Islands. We also offer insight and stewarship opportunities through our annual Point Reyes Birding and Nature Festival so people can learn, and appreciate our unique environment.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Since 1971, EAC has supported wilderness designation of acreage Point Reyes National Seashore. EAC supported the Sierra Club's proposal for designation of 30,000 acres of wilderness (rather than the Point Reyes National Seashore's request of only 5,000 acres), provided testimony at hearings, and organized EAC members to write letters to President Nixon supporting designation. Most recently in 2007, EAC successfully advocated for Drakes Estero to be converted from potential wilderness to full wilderness in 2012.

"We are exceptionally fortunate to have Point Reyes National Seashore, a rare ecological haven, in our backyard. For decades, Point Reyes has served as a natural sanctuary for wildlife and wilderness lovers. At Point Reyes, we relish the opportunity to reconnect to the wild heartbeat of nature that is deeply rooted within us. Drakes Estero, long considered the ecological heart of spectacular Point Reyes, is the only marine wilderness area on the West Coast. After a long battle over the heart of this national park, on Thursday Drakes Estero will run wild — free of non-native oyster cultivation — for the first time in almost eighty years.

Thankfully, tens of thousands of national park and wilderness advocates from west Marin to Washington, D.C., including biologists Sylvia Earle and E.O. Wilson, the late coastal champion Bill Kortum and Miwok ancestors who have sacred sites there, came together to defend Drakes Estero.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

West Marin is a unique environment with an exceptional community working for clean air, pure waters, healthy ecosystems, a diverse and thriving native flora and fauna, and the preservation of a rural, community spirit. Prevention of unnecessary pesticide use is critical for the residents and sensitive ecosystems of West Marin.

EAC is a proud council member of the West Marin Mosquito Council (WMMC). The WMMC is a community group composed of representatives of our local public utilities and environmental groups focused on the use of pesticides in West Marin. We also produced a sustainabilty brochure on recycling in our area, and a Spanish video how to protect the environment.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups

The MPA Watch program:

is a citizen science program
trains volunteers to collect scientific data on consumptive and non-consumptive coastal and marine resource use by ocean users using specific protocols and a survey. Surveys are observational only, and collect human activities in and outside of MPAs, such as surfing, kayaking, fishing, boating, running, etc., with the intention of improving our understanding of how people are using our statewide MPAs.
informs MPA management and supports the California Department of Fish and Wildlife

The California MPA Watch program is implemented by ten different organizations throughout the state. The Marin MPA Watch Volunteer Program is managed by the Environmental Action Committee of West Marin (EAC), and in collaboration with the California Academy of Sciences, and Point Reyes National Seashore. The Marin MPA Watch focuses their efforts at Agate County Beach, Corte Madera Marsh, Drakes Beach, Drakes Estero, Point Resistance, and the Point Reyes Headlands.

Not only do local volunteers learn about their coastal environment and become citizen scientists and stewards of the area, but they generate quantities of monitoring data that would not be possible under the current state budget.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We provide an essential voice on behalf of the area's priceless natural resources before the many boards, commissions, and agencies of County, State, and Federal government regarding environmental issues facing our coastal communities. These communities are gateway towns to three national parks, three state parks, open space, agricultural lands and private land that require intimate knowledge and understanding of policy, science and law to help protect wildlife, habitat, watersheds, wilderness, and the coastline so future generations and can experience and enjoy them for years to come. We do this by focusing on county and community development plans, public access issues, supporting pathways for ecologically sustainable agriculture, promotion of affordable housing development, and through partnering, volunteerism, events, education and engagement opportunities.

We provide an essential voice on behalf of the area's priceless natural resources before the many boards, commissions, and agencies of County, State, and Federal government regarding environmental issues facing our coastal communities. We do this by reviewing and commenting on planning documents, providing testimony, collaborating with partners, writing and signing petitions, educating ou rmembers and the public and important environmental issues facing our community and beyond, and more.

ADVOCACY

Use grassroots strategies to research and publicize local environmental issues facing our community to inform, empower, and educate stakeholders and our members.
APPRECIATION
Respect the complex ecology and intrinsic value of the natural world.
Collaboration

COLLABORATION
Partner with local communities, organizations, governments, businesses, and members to ensure maximum public participation around local environmental issues.

EDUCATION
Provide opportunities to learn about the environment through events, community workshops, outreach, and publications.

ENGAGEMENT
Engage our community in activities that promote a healthy environment, including stewardship through membership, events, citizen science and volunteer opportunities.

INTEGRITY
Use science, law, and policy to make ethical decisions around complex environmental issues in a dynamic environmental and political landscape.

Since 1971, EAC has had a substantial impact on protection of the natural resources of West Marin.
Some of EAC's key accomplishments:

Advocated for the conservation and protection of the Giacomini Wetlands bringing awareness to this important habitat (EAC organized a well-publicized “sail-in" of local craft that drew attention to the scheme and mobilized public opposition to it. The campaign was successful: the filling was stopped). Eventually, the wetlands were purchased by Golden Gate National Recreation Area in the 2000s and restored in 2008 by multiple agencies.

Participated in the community effort to stop the controversial Countywide Plan that would have constructed a six-lane highway from the Golden Gate Bridge to Point Reyes and constructed over 1.3 million homes.

Stopped the expansion of the West Marin dump through a decade long struggle.

Banned the use of jet skis in the Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary including Tomales Bay.

Protected Estero Americano and Estero San Antonio when the City of Santa Rosa proposed to dump its sewage into these estuaries. Later, EAC stopped developers who proposed to build Marin Coast Golf Ranch at the mouth of Estero San Antonio.

Protected the Tomales Dunes-wetlands complex at Lawson's Landing (after 40 years of advocacy), striking a balance between protecting environmentally sensitive habitat and supporting the continued operation of this large, family-owned coastal campground.

Led the effort to secure international recognition for Tomales Bay as a Ramsar Site, or Wetland of International Importance.

Stopped construction of industrial wind turbines along the ridgelines of the east shore of Tomales Bay.

Successfully advocated for the designation of Drakes Estero Wilderness in Point Reyes National Seashore.

Due to the commitment of prior generations and organizations, like EAC, West Marin is now an international destination, with three national parks, three state parks, miles of open space, and agricultural lands where people come to enjoy, recreate, appreciate, and discover our natural world.

“The work, patience and perseverance done and shown by EAC has lead to a precedent-setting and forward-looking way to protect the valuable, beautiful and mysterious resources of the Gulf of the Farallones. You should all be very proud. The world, nation and I thank you. — Ed Uber, former Manager of the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sancutary

Financials

ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION COMMITTEE OF WEST MARIN
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION COMMITTEE OF WEST MARIN

Board of directors
as of 2/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Bridger Mitchell

Retired - Economic Professor


Board co-chair

Mr. Kenneth Drexler

Estate Planning Lawyer

Terence Carroll

River Otter Ecology Project

Jerry Meral

Director of the California Water Program at the Natural Heritage Institute

David Weinsoff

Law Office David J. Weinsoff

David Wimpheimer

CalNaturalist

Sarah Killingsworth

Family Lawyer

Clare Seda

Community Organizer

Cynthia Lloyd

Retired from United Nations and the Population Council

Mairi Pileggi

Retired Professor, Dominican University

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Not applicable
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/02/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/02/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.