PLATINUM2023

Pediatric Cancer Foundation

...Coming Together for a Cure

aka PCF   |   Mamaroneck, NY   |  http://www.pcfcares.org

Mission

Pediatric Cancer Foundation (PCF) is a non profit charitable organization dedicated to eradicating childhood cancer by raising funds for ground breaking research and early phase clinical trials conducted by world renowned doctors at the hospitals we support, as well as contributing to state of the art medical equipment. The critical early phase funding is a stepping stone to later stage, larger institutional funding and is instrumental in providing novel treatments and potential cures.

Ruling year info

1972

President

Pamela Strauss Peligri

Main address

P.O.Box 785

Mamaroneck, NY 10543 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

23-7161550

NTEE code info

Other Medical Research N.E.C. (H99)

Cancer Research (H30)

Pediatrics Research (H98)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Cancer is the number one non-accidental disease in children. One in five children diagnosed with cancer in the U.S. will not survive. All types of childhood cancers combined receive only 4% of the U.S. federal funding for cancer research. There are many different types of childhood cancers. While some diagnoses have good cure rates, others have significantly less positive outcomes. Our goal at PCF is to fund for cutting -edge research to give hope to the many parents whose children have cancer to go through successful treatments and find a cure for every child.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

PCFDTP and PIPseq programs

PCF Developmental Therapeutics Program (PCFDTP) at Columbia University, New York, has become the premier destination for patients and their families in the New York tri-state area who wish access to early phase clinical trials. The support of PCF has been critical to our mission to advance the field of pediatric oncology one patient at a time. Now linked to our Precision in Pediatric Sequencing program (PIPseq), we are using cutting edge technologies to attempt to match patients to the experimental therapy most likely to impact their individual tumor. Discoveries in the laboratory are being delivered to patients, and individual patients are leading scientific discovery in the field of cancer biology. PCF’s consistent support of the of the PCFDTP and PIPseq programs has been transformative, allowing the research done to grow in regional and national stature, and more importantly, to get new therapies to children who may have been told “there is nothing more to do.”

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Brain tumors remain the leading cause of death in children with cancer. Children with newly diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) and glioblastoma, or relapsed malignant brain tumors (medulloblastoma, ependymoma, high-grade glioma), have an extremely poor prognosis. Despite advances in the treatment of adult cancers, researchers have failed to make significant progress in treating children with brain cancer. Therefore, as a team at Columbia University Medical Center, they have focused their efforts to discovering better methods of drug delivery that would ensure a more precise and targeted delivery while reducing systemic long-term effects for patients.
Convection Enhanced Delivery (CED) is a method by which medicine can be infused directly into the brain tumor under controlled pressure so that maximum diffusion of the drug is achieved. Instead of one single injection, their neurosurgeons will implant under the skin a programmable drug-filled pump that has catheters expanding directly into the brain, allowing repeated infusions while avoiding the systemic side effects. This method is particularly appropriate for tumors that cannot be surgically removed.
In this study they will be enrolling 9 subjects. They have enrolled 6 subjects to date.
Focused Ultrasound with microbubbles (FUS) is a non-invasive method of “opening” the blood brain barrier with ultrasound micro-waves, allowing medicines to enter in sufficient concentrations. They received FDA approval to begin the trial in October 2020 and received IRB approval in March 2021. They are on their way to begin enrolling the first subjects this summer of 2021.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Development of new therapies for neuroblastoma is hindered by the lack of knowledge of the underlying biology that leads to development of the disease, as well as the lack of an appropriate, human model of the disorder. Using stem cells to model human cancers is an emerging area that can provide insights into the complex biology of cancers such as neuroblastoma. The researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center propose to use a newly validated stem cell-based model of neuroblastoma to explore the underlying biology of the disease which they expect will provide them with insights into new potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of neuroblastoma that were previously undiscoverable. This project will directly inform future therapeutic screening studies of these newly discovered potential drug targets.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The recent clinical trial successes of mRNA vaccines for SARS-CoV2 have highlighted the power and speed with which nucleotide therapeutics can be designed, standardized, tested, and translated into the clinic. Here, they propose the use of RNA for the treatment of pediatric cancers. Utilizing the process of alternative splicing, the lab at The Ohio State University College of Medicine, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital seeks to reactivate tumor suppressor capabilities of gene p53, a gene that plays a part in controlling cell division and death, by directly targeting a significant negative regulator of p53, known as MDM2, within diseased cells.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

While immune checkpoint inhibitors such as nivolumab and ipilimumab are safe in children, they are not effective treatment alone in pediatric solid tumors, likely because pediatric tumors are “cold” with low levels of T-cell infiltration and antigen presentation. Cryoablation therapy, which is a minimally invasive treatment that freezes tumor cells has been found to stimulate T-cells and other white blood cells to enter a tumor and stimulate a systemic anti-tumor immune response. The researchers at The Children’s National Hospital - Children’s National Research Institute in Washington DC hypothesize that cryoablation therapy will enhance the efficacy of checkpoint inhibition against pediatric solid tumors. Therefore, they propose a phase II clinical trial for patients with relapsed or refractory pediatric solid tumors and more than one site of disease that will combine cryoablation therapy with nivolumab and ipilimumab with goal of disease response.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Children and youth
Children and youth
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of research studies conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of organizations applying for grants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our aim is to help eradicate the number one non-accidental killer of children. Pediatric Cancer Foundation has been funding game-changing pediatric cancer research and providing hope for children and their families. We also fund patient treatment and endow world-class hospitals and oncologists with the equipment they need to save lives and improve patient care. Our Medical Advisory Committee reviews grant proposals from doctors and makes decisions on research programs that have committed Principal Investigators to see their research in pediatric oncology go to the next level of success.

We at PCF organize many fundraising events during the year. These funds have enabled the Foundation to purchase state-of-the-art equipment, support research projects and bring exceptional fellows to both the surgical and oncology departments. With the inclusion of advanced technological equipment that we support, our doctors are in collaboration with hospitals both nationally and internationally. Many hours are spent by our caring membership (which consists of over 200 volunteers). They enable us to raise significant funds in a time of underfunded hospitals and scarce government grants. This year we will have committed almost half a million dollars in programs, research and equipment. In an effort to meet these commitments, we organize annual events including the Evening Benefit, Annual Journal, Camp-a-thons, and a number of satellite events.

We have a network of over 200 volunteers in the tri-state area, who work tirelessly and organize different types of fundraising events for PCF. Our communication reaches out to people in other parts of the country as well via social media and emails, who participate in their own communities and help us in our fundraising efforts. The doctors and hospitals we support have collaborated with researchers on national and international levels, broadening their research and capabilities to strive for a better and healthy future for pediatric cancer patients.

Pediatric Cancer Foundation, known as the Maxwell Leeds Pediatric Tumor Foundation until well after 1982, was founded in 1970 by grateful parents whose son underwent surgery at Babies Hospital, New York Presbyterian Medical Center. (This hospital is now known as Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian.) These grateful parents established the Foundation after realizing that malignant pediatric tumors were extremely prevalent and that children afflicted in this way needed treatment with the most advanced medical techniques. The Foundation started simply and utilized the services of devoted volunteers to perform every aspect of fund raising. The first group of Directors were the parents’ family, neighbors and friends, but in a relatively short period of time the membership expanded rapidly to over 40 committed individuals who gave their expertise, time, and support to achieve outstanding goals in basic and clinical research as well as care and treatment of children with cancer. Today PCF has grown to include support for children and their families afflicted with ALL types of cancer. Four decades of support has enabled the Foundation to purchase state-of-the-art equipment, support research projects and bring exceptional fellows to both the surgical and oncology departments.

Research will be funded to bring novel treatments collaborated with renowned physicians around the world. PCF plans on funding other programs to find a cure for various types of pediatric cancer involving Immunotherapy and Gene targeted therapy, in several leading research programs at New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Stephen D. Hassenfeld Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at NYU Langone Medical Center, Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center and Comer Children’s Hospital, The University of Chicago Medicine & Biological Sciences, Mt. Sinai Health System, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Children’s National Hospital - Children’s National Research Institute, Washington, D.C.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Pediatric Cancer Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Pediatric Cancer Foundation

Board of directors
as of 01/31/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Bonnie Shyer

Pediatric Cancer Foundation

Term: 2015 - 2021

Bonnie Shyer

Marsha Walker

Amy Hirschhorn

Stefanie Mittman

Stefanie Bartell - Zednik

Judith Elkins

Suellen Singer

Cheryl Rosen

Taryn Kristal

Jennifer Levkoff

Jenny Frank Goldsmith

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/31/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data