MEND

People helping People

aka MEND - Meet Each Need with Dignity   |   Pacoima, CA   |  www.mendpoverty.org

Mission

With dignity and respect, MEND’s mission is to meet immediate needs of individuals and families and increase their access to opportunities that strengthen their capacity to thrive.

Notes from the nonprofit

Karla and her young family are one of thousands of San Fernando Valley families that relied on MEND for food assistance last year. In April 2021, Karla's family experienced their first significant blow: Karla's husband, Sergio, lost his job. It shook the family, but they felt they could eke out a living from Karla's house-cleaning job. It could pay the rent & food in the meantime, while Sergio worked odd-jobs & looked for stable work. Utilities would have to wait. Then the worst happened. Karla too lost her job. She says: "My employer did not feel safe with me coming in during COVID." She describes the months that followed as very dark. "Our stress kept us up all night", Karla shares. We enrolled the family in the food program immediately. They were relieved, and thankful. MEND staff also helped the family pay their utilities. Sergio is employed now & their relief for coming through 2021 is so relatable. "I've no idea what we'd have done if MEND did not exist. I am so grateful."

Ruling year info

1976

President/CEO

Ms. Janet Marinaccio

Main address

10641 N. San Fernando Rd.

Pacoima, CA 91331 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

M.E.N.D.

EIN

23-7306337

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Food insecurity is the limited ability to get enough food for adequate nourishment; it means worrying about having enough food because families lack the finances to buy more. It has far-reaching implications both for the individual and low-income families and the larger community. Adults and children who are food insecure are less productive at school/work, and more likely to suffer from other conditions, including depression, obesity (from eating cheap, fast food as a substitute for good nutrition), and developmental delays. Hunger is a symptom of underlying factors related to poverty. Food insecurity is therefore a powerful symbol of larger economic and social challenges and struggles experienced by individuals and families. We recognize that successfully addressing the condition requires multiple approaches including – in addition to food access – steady employment & income, financial health, education, legal status, health & wellness, and many other pathways.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

MEND Community Nourishment Programs

MEND’s Community Nourishment Programs (CNP) feed thousands of food-insecure people a month through a Food Pantry (direct distribution), Food Bank (distribution to partners), Buen Provecho Farmers Market (self-selection of fresh fruit/vegetables) and Little Health Market (low-carb options for people with chronic health conditions). CNP distributed almost 4.0Million lbs. of nutritious food in 2021, translating to 3.1 million meals benefitting almost 300,000 people. Those utilizing the CNP include families with children struggling to make ends meet, low-income seniors and people who are homeless who sometimes rely on foraging to survive. As the San Fernando Valley’s largest food bank/pantry, we additionally serve thousands of people throughout the region who access food through 53 partnering faith- and community-based food pantries which rely on MEND for food, thus expanding impact on food-insecure people throughout LA County.

Population(s) Served

MEND offers all of its core services to people experiencing homelessness. Our Homeless Care Services traditionally support about 2,000 men and women every year, serving them a hot meal and providing them with food-to-go, change of clothing, hygiene items and referrals to our partners in housing & addiction/mental health treatment. During the pandemic, some services were paused and we continue to embed our services to those who are homeless in other MEND programming and continue providing nutritious food, hygiene kits and referrals for additional services. As public health requirements have eased, we have restarted First Step every Thursday morning at MEND's Pacoima location.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Adults

The Family Support Program (FSP) works with families who demonstrate the highest need and can benefit from individualized support to achieve their goals. Our case managers are working with enrolled families one-on-one to help them overcome long-term challenges that have kept them dependent on the Community Nourishment Programs. Case management continued throughout the pandemic, primarily via phone check-in’s and occasional distanced in-person visits. As we look ahead, we are continuing the success of FSP by consolidating it into the Here We Thrive (HWT) program to focus on holistic service-delivery to the community. Here We Thrive merges all of MEND’s existing case management services, adding a critical employment component and other supports to help families uncover/address the root of the issues that keep them dependent on MEND’s crisis services. HWT is an innovative, forward looking, and optimistic answer and plan to bring real change to the individuals & families that we serve.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families
Children and youth
Adults

The Pathways to Wellness (PtW) program, utilizing a case management approach, helps individuals who are struggling with chronic health conditions learn and incorporate behaviors that help them achieve better food security and empowers them to develop lasting healthy lifestyle habits. Clients participate in cooking demonstrations, nutrition workshops, exercise groups, and access to The Little Health Market where they receive low-carb food options to support their goals to achieve healthy weight, blood pressure & lower blood readings. We modified but did not stop services during the pandemic allowing for socially distanced workshops and wellness checks. As we look ahead, Wellness will consolidate under the Here We Thrive (HWT) program to focus on holistic service-delivery to the community. HWT is the innovative, forward looking, and optimistic answer and plan to bring real change to the people that we serve.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Health
Adults
Families

Spurred on by increasing COVID cases in late 2020, MEND started Hope & Care outreach services to engage community members in conversations about COVID, to help with testing and vaccination appointments and to support those who are isolated due to COVID with food-delivery to discourage them from breaking quarantine to access food. Through Hope & Care, we’re also reaching people in need of mental health assistance with referrals and support.

Population(s) Served
Health
Adults
Families

Finally, because MEND serves a population of people that are deeply vulnerable, we also offer supportive services to help (upon evaluation) participants in need of help with paying part of their rent, utilities, professional clothing, even home items like a stove, bedding, etc. During the pandemic, for example, a few of the families we support found themselves struggling with mediocre internet connections, no computers, and other technology deficits. In some cases, MEND was able to directly help. Where MEND is unable to intervene directly, we refer participants to other partner agencies in the community.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors
Homeless people
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors
Homeless people

Where we work

Awards

California Non-Profit of the Year 2012

California Governor's award

RecycLA Star Award 2018

Republic Services

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Paid work experience clients work in a variety of locations within MEND including intake, food bank, and administration. This activity did not occur in 2021 but has resumed in 2022.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

MEND Community Nourishment Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

MEND engages volunteers of all skill-levels to help meet the needs of the community. During the pandemic, we limited the number of volunteers due to public health requirements.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth, Immigrants and migrants, Unemployed people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric records the total number of clients served in a calendar year across all MEND programs.

Number of people receiving clothing.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to the pandemic, MEND closed its onsite clothing center, opting instead to meet this client need on a one-to-one basis moving on.

Number of meals prepared by families.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

MEND Community Nourishment Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

MEND tracks the number of meals prepared by families that are made possible through the distribution of emergency food kits by MEND’s Foodbank/food pantry.

Number of pounds of food distributed.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

MEND Community Nourishment Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

MEND tracks the number of pounds of food distributed directly to the community via the food pantry, food bank, Buen Provecho farmers market, Little Health Market and home delivery.

Service encounters for homeless individuals and families.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Adults

Related Program

FIRST STEP: Homeless Care Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to pandemic restrictions, MEND was able to collect only occasional data on this metric in 2021.

Number of clinic visits provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth, Adults, People of Latin American descent, Immigrants

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

MEND no longer offers onsite medical, dental & vision clinics. However, MEND facilitates vaccine clinics onsite and offsite at accessible locations.

Number of nutritious food boxes distributed.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, Unemployed people

Related Program

MEND Community Nourishment Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each client receives 2 food bags at MEND - 30-35 lbs. of fruits & vegetables, and 40 lbs. of shelf-stable food, i.e. canned food, rice, beans, etc. bread, eggs, and other items.

Number of eye care clinic visits

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

MEND retired its eye/vision clinic in March 2020.

Number of COVID-19 PPE kits distributed to the community

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Health, Families

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric tracks PPE kits distributed by the Hope & Care program, a new program launched in 2020.

Number of instances of COVID outreach conducted via tabling/events by Hope & Care Outreach Ambassadors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Families, Health

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric measures outreach conducted by the Hope & Care, a new program launched in 2020.

Number of clients served by Pathways to Wellness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health, Adults, Families

Related Program

Pathways to Wellness (transitioning under Here We Thrive in 2022)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of participants enrolled in wellness activities working toward achieving better health, medication compliance, weight loss, lower bp and blood sugar, etc.

Number of families served by the Family Support Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Family Support Program (transitioning under Here We Thrive in 2022)

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

# of families enrolled in case management services address endemic challenges that keep them reliant on crisis services. This number dropped in 2021 as we did not enroll a new cohort due to COVID.

Number of families that demonstrated improvement on self-sufficiency assessment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Family Support Program (transitioning under Here We Thrive in 2022)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric measures positive outcome for families enrolled in the Family Support Program. In 2021, we had a smaller cohort due to COVID.

Number of diapers distributed to families in need

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

A service provided to the most vulnerable families with small children.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Through a comprehensive set of programs and services, MEND seeks to alleviate food insecurity and meet the crisis needs of the most vulnerable in order to create opportunities for individuals and families to not only survive, but to thrive. MEND also aims to ensure it continues to be an efficiently run organization capable of meeting the needs of the community and remain an anchor institution in the San Fernando Valley. As we celebrate our 51st year, MEND is looking for ways to answer the question: How can we help our community develop the resiliency it needs to combat and overcome the next crisis? We recognize that distributing food alone, though important, does not eradicate hunger and food insecurity. We will continue to provide food in traditional ways, but we are also looking at an approach to help more of our families overcome food insecurity and achieve the life security they need FOR GOOD. We have seen how COVID multiplied throughout the communities that MEND serves and impacted thousands of people. Our work is committed to strengthening individuals, families and the entire community by addressing their root challenges. Poverty, wellness, and food security are inextricably linked. Good nutrition through short-term food access is essential to support the activities related to poverty reduction, such as work, education and other activities, and positive sustainable change ensures that people have the resources to maintain food security.

MEND aspires to build a stronger, more resilient community in two ways: (1) by meeting their crisis needs - food, clothing, services for those who are homeless, COVID-information & resources, etc. and; (2) helping them discover and address endemic challenges that contribute to their current economic & social vulnerability. MEND's 2021/24 strategic plan also emphasizes co-location & partnerships with high-impact agencies to address the challenges that keep the most vulnerable in poverty.

The following four major focus areas will guide our work overall over the next 3 years (2021-2024). Annually, work plans, indicators, and measures will be developed by the staff and leadership allowing for maximum responsiveness to changes in our community’s needs.

Strategies for ensuring the needs of those we serve are met, are as follows:
o Partnerships: Leveraging expertise and core capabilities of other providers: Ensuring that MEND maintains robust collaborations with grocery retailers, food distributors, and food service providers who supply the bulk of food for distribution; and partnering with community- & faith-based food pantries are critical to our efforts to reach underserved, food-insecure communities throughout Los Angeles. SB1383 opens up new opportunities to partner with groups that previously did not donate excess food – thus increasing the supply of available edible food for distribution. A third type of partnership is one that brings community resources within easy reach of our clients. In 2022, we will increase efforts to open up onsite space for agencies that provide needed services and who are willing to co-locate at MEND.
o Program Excellence: Adopting measurable and transformational outcomes: Providing for the immediate needs of vulnerable people is important, but MEND is also invested in working one-to-one with families to help them uncover and overcome long-term challenges that keep them dependent on crisis services. This program – Here We Thrive – offers intensive, case managed individualized supports addressing such areas as income/employment, housing, health/wellness, etc. that affect and hold families and individuals back from thriving.
o Financial Integrity: Cultivating a viable and sustainable business model: MEND has worked incredibly hard to retire debt, eliminate deficits, diversify income and build up reserves. In fact, if we hadn’t taken the steps to do so before the pandemic, MEND may not have survived the pandemic. Our commitment to good stewardship is a core strategy which gives our community confidence that MEND will be there through good & hard times.
o Organizational Vitality: Improving fundamental capabilities and core strength: Hiring the right staff & engaging committed volunteers is a key strategy in helping meet goals. MEND’s diverse staff and volunteers are plugged into the communities we serve, and speak the languages our clients speak. This has contributed to a deep trust between those that we serve & MEND.

As an anchor to our community, MEND has accumulated decades of experience in serving the most vulnerable people in the community, developed strong & effective partnerships, and enlisted seasoned and dedicated Board members, organization leadership, professional staff and volunteers to deliver on outcomes. A well-thought out strategic plan with regular monitoring provides the framework for accomplishing key goals.

MEND started a half century ago as a poverty relief organization, addressing the most basic needs of struggling people and families. Today, our purpose remains focused on meeting those essential, often crisis needs, but our near-future also requires us to help disrupt the cycles of generational poverty that so many of the individuals and families we serve, experience. Our current strategic plan includes a vision for organizational, individual, and community resilience - because thriving includes being able to bounce back after a crisis. We recognize that successfully addressing these long-term challenges require multiple approaches including – in addition to food access – steady employment & income, financial health, education, social connectedness, legal status, health & wellness, and many other pathways.

o In 2021, MEND's services benefited 505,769 people. A majority (297,550) accessed Community Nourishment Programs (food bank, food pantry, farmers' market & health market) at our location in Pacoima and through 53 community- and faith-based food pantries throughout LA. CNP distributed 3.7MM lbs. of food in 2021, translating to 3.1MM meals. Each individual/family receives up to 50 lbs. of shelf-stable & fresh veg/fruits, including eggs, dairy and bread.
o 260,547 benefited from several of MEND's outreach services including COVID outreach which facilitated over 4000 vaccines at on & offsite clinics and distributed PPE and cleaning products during approx. 56,100 encounters.
o MEND’s case management programs - Addressed through “Here We Thrive” (HWT), MEND's intensive case supports help participants address root causes of their struggles and food insecurity. HWT is a focused intervention to help enrolled participants overcome challenges (health, income/employment, housing, etc.) they struggle with. In 2021, several lost their jobs and/or were negatively impacted by school closures. This set them back, slowing their progress. Stress over insufficient funds and unpaid rent was common. However, 21 clients remained employed, and 10 families continue with the 2022 cohort to address the crises in their lives.
o 71 clients were enrolled in wellness services to improve health habits, increase physical activity, lose weight, achieve medical compliance & manage stress. In 2021, 69% dropped or maintained their BMI, a significant achievement given the stress & weight gain COVID-19 had on the general U.S. population where 61% of adults reported undesired weight gain. A majority of participants maintained their activity level & medical compliance.
o We provided over 5000 homeless encounters in meals, clothing, hygiene kits, pet food & more. As the pandemic restrictions are withdrawn, we’re bringing back First Step, a service dedicated to this population, offering direct & partner services every Thurs.
o Finally, for seniors & those at high risk for COVID 19, MEND provided food-delivery and home check-ins where needed, to ensure that their needs are met.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve the most vulnerable families and individuals in the San Fernando Valley and LA County. A majority (88%) are Latino or Black; 53% female; and 17% single-parent households. A quarter of clients are unsheltered (living on the streets) and 12% at imminent risk of homelessness. Many experience deep generational poverty with long-term reliance on MEND’s food services in order to survive. Though most MEND clients are food-insecure, 20% have such severe food insecurity, it disrupts their eating patterns. A sad statistic: In a spot survey of almost 200 MEND clients, 11% said they'd "go without food" if they were unable to access food from MEND; 24% said they would not know what to do.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    MEND recently underwent a Community Needs Assessment in partnership with the Center for Nonprofit Management completed in Fall 2020. Recommendations included modifying days and hours of service to take into account client work or childcare responsibilities and consideration of expanding program eligibility to those living just above the poverty line. Taking this feedback into account and in light of the pandemic, we eased restrictions on eligibility for the Foodbank so that all who request help with critical services, receive it. We also continue to expand our reach by partnering with community & faith agencies with competency serving diverse communities MEND does not serve directly (e.g. ppl w/disability). Our ultimate goal is to ensure services are accessible to all who are in need.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Over the decades, these practices have enabled the community we trust to develop a deep trust with MEND, thus creating a welcoming environment that not only embraces all races, cultures and people, it assures those we serve that their feedback is valued. We approach our work as a partner with the people we serve, listening and inviting their feedback in focus groups, questionnaires and informal feedback. The latter is often from those of our participants who also volunteer (particularly within our Community Nourishment Programs) and share their observances of how processes could be improved.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

MEND
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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MEND

Board of directors
as of 03/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Robert Rawitch

Rawitch Consulting

Term: 2021 - 2023

Steve Brown

Real Estate Investment & Finance

Ron Villafana

State Compensation Insurance Fund (ret.)

Jason Horstman

JP Morgan Chase

Janice Boafo

County of Ventura Human Services

Manoj Mathew

ACE Medical Associates

Fred Ruopp, Jr.

Chelsea Management

Gabi Perez

Home Street Bank

David Jones

Lewitt Hackman

Sally Turner

Journalist Professor

Alex Hemmelgarn

Lewitt Hackman

Margo Messina

Bank of America

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/11/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/11/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.