MEND

aka MEND - Meet Each Need with Dignity   |   Pacoima, CA   |  www.mendpoverty.org

Mission

With dignity and respect, MEND’s mission is to meet immediate needs of individuals and families and increase their access to opportunities that strengthen their capacity to thrive.

Ruling year info

1976

President/CEO

Ms. Janet Marinaccio

Main address

10641 N. San Fernando Rd.

Pacoima, CA 91331 USA

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Formerly known as

M.E.N.D.

EIN

23-7306337

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

MEND continues to be an anchor institution providing comprehensive and empowering poverty relief services targeting individuals and families that are low-income, homeless or at risk of homelessness and are suffering from food insecurity. MEND works to provide a critical safety net for the most vulnerable residing in and around the San Fernando Valley through an array of programs geared at uplifting and empowering those we serve.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

MEND Emergency Food Bank & Food Pantry

MEND’s Emergency Food Bank & Food Pantry is the largest of its kind in the San Fernando Valley and has long been a point of entry for a majority of MEND clients. MEND serves thousands of food insecure individuals and families on a yearly basis through a combination of direct Food Pantry distribution out of its Pacoima location, and through a network of Food Bank partners that receive food for their own local distribution throughout Los Angeles County –from South LA to Antelope Valley. Those utilizing the food pantry often include families with children struggling to make ends meet, low-income seniors and people who are homeless who—because of few options—sometimes rely on foraging to survive. As MEND’s 2019 Humanitarian Award honoree, Dr. LaVonna Blair Lewis put it, “Food is not discretionary.” Equitable access to nutritious food supports a healthy life, and a healthy life supports better overall outcomes.” In 2019, the Foodbank benefited individuals and families through 200,000 encounters. By distributing more than 2.7 million pounds of food, the Foodbank empowered families throughout LA County to consume 2,279,958 healthy meals in 2019. In addition to pre-filled boxes of nutritious self-stable food, meats, eggs and milk, the Foodbank also offers a no-cost bountiful farmers' market, Buen Provecho, where families can select unlimited amounts of produce to meet their needs. During the pandemic MEND has been committed to ensuring critical food services are not interrupted as we have experienced a tremendous increase in demand for services from the general public. Food distribution has been modified to follow safety protocols, and is now being delivered in walk-up and drive-through formats to limit contact between individuals in adherence with public health directives.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

The Clothing Center distributes essentials, such as jeans, underwear, shoes, diapers, toiletries and hygiene products to individuals and families in need, including clients experiencing homelessness. In 2019, over 5000 individuals received Clothing Center services. During cold weather months clients, particularly those who are homeless, may access warm clothing, jackets and blankets. During the pandemic this service has been modified due to safety reasons, but hygiene items and diapers/wipes continue to be distributed to individuals and families in need.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth
Families

MEND offers all of its core services to people experiencing homelessness. Our Homeless Care Services traditionally support about 2,000 men and women every year, serving them a hot meal and providing them with food-to-go, change of clothing, hygiene items and referrals to our partners in housing & mental health. During the pandemic, some services have been put on pause, but MEND continues providing nutritious food along with hygiene kits with gloves and disposable masks and pet food for those with best friends.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Adults

The Family Support Program works with clients who demonstrate the highest need and can benefit from individualized support to achieve their goals and address any barriers they may have. We believe that by providing services to the entire family, instead of geared towards one person, we are better equipped to identify the strengths that can support a family to thrive, ultimately supporting all the individuals that make up a family. A dedicated Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LSCW) leads a team of staff and MSW student interns who provide families with one-to-one coaching and additional activities geared towards achieving success. Each family participates in an individualized assessment with their case manager in order to create a road map that breaks goals down into achievable components. Families receive support in connecting to additional resources both in and outside of MEND. Some of the barriers families enrolled in the Family Support Program face include housing challenges; legal issues; immigration and right to work issues; employment barriers, histories of trauma to due to domestic/community violence; and so on. Case management continues to operate during the pandemic, conducting phone check-in’s with clients and supporting families with needed resources. Many families report these phone check-in’s as a vital way to stay connected and receive tangible resource and emotional support as they struggle with home-schooling their children during school closures as well as dealing with the fear that COVID-19 has brought with it.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Families
Children and youth
Adults

The Pathways to Wellness program incorporates a collaboration with the Foodbank and Family Support Program. Utilizing a case management approach, it helps individuals who are struggling with chronic health conditions learn and incorporate behaviors that help them achieve better food security, and empowers them to develop lasting healthy lifestyle habits, sustained health, resilience and wellbeing. Those who are enrolled receive individualized goal-setting aimed at achieving positive health outcomes. Clients participate in cooking demonstrations, nutrition workshops, and exercise groups. Participants also have access to The Little Health Market where they receive low-carb & organic food selections. During the pandemic, group classes are on pause, but we continue provide services to those who are at high-risk for COVID (with underlying conditions and/or advanced age) by doing socially distanced home wellness checks, status updates on health focused goals, and food delivery in partnership with students from West Coast University’s nursing program. This added service addresses several barriers – minimizing risk-exposure, addressing mobility/transportation limitations, and offering continuous food access for “at-risk” participants. The Little Health Market’s food selections are still made available to participants in a home-delivered food box.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Economically disadvantaged people
Health
Adults
Families

Where we work

Awards

California Non-Profit of the Year 2012

California Governor's award

RecycLA Star Award 2018

Republic Services

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Paid work experience clients work in a variety of locations within MEND, including intake, clinics, food bank, and administration.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

MEND engages volunteers of all skill-levels to help meet the needs of the community.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric records the total number of unduplicated clients served in a calendar year across all MEND programs.

Number of people receiving clothing.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

MEND Clothing Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Clothing and other necessities are included in this metric.

Number of meals prepared by families.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

MEND Emergency Food Bank & Food Pantry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of pounds of food distributed.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Adults, Children and youth

Related Program

MEND Emergency Food Bank & Food Pantry

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Service encounters for homeless individuals and families.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Through a comprehensive set of programs and services, MEND seeks to alleviate food insecurity and meet the crisis needs of the most vulnerable in order to create opportunities for individuals and families to not only survive, but to thrive. In addition to providing basic needs for participants, MEND supports low-income individuals and families in gaining skills and accessing resources needed to overcome long-term challenges and effectively stopping the cycle of poverty. MEND aims to ensure it continues to be an efficiently run organization capable of meeting the needs of the community and remain an anchor institution in the San Fernando Valley.

-Ensure mission focus in all programs and services
-Be aligned and responsive to the needs of the community by conducting periodic Community Needs Assessment and Asset Mapping to define existing service gaps and determine MEND’s role in meeting those needs.
-Maintain healthy revenues so as to adequately invest in services and programs
-Maintain a professional and effective staff and engaged board of directors
-Maintain an outcomes measurement system that reports program effectiveness, efficiency, quality, and satisfaction
-Maintain high levels of efficiency and cost-effectiveness in all operational areas.

As an anchor to our community, MEND has accumulated decades of experience in serving the most vulnerable people in the community, developed strong & effective partnerships, and enlisted seasoned and dedicated Board members, organization leadership, professional staff and volunteers to deliver on outcomes. A well-thought out strategic plan with regular monitoring provides the framework for accomplishing key goals.

Since our founding in 1971 by a group of caring friends and neighbors working out of their garage to provide food and toiletries to those in need, MEND has evolved into one of the largest poverty relief agencies in Los Angeles County. Every year, MEND’s services benefit over 100,000 people including individuals and families who are the most vulnerable, those who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless, and low-income seniors. MEND meets the most basic needs for food and nourishment, clothing, hygiene kits, and diapers, etc. for those in need, while also offering interventions that address long-term challenges that keep families in poverty. These intensive case management services help families with the most significant barriers develop and implement a plan to increase their self-sufficiency. MEND has built on its core programming, introducing additional services aimed at empowering clients to break the cycle of generational poverty and reducing long-term negative impacts associated with poverty.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    MEND recently underwent a Community Needs Assessment in partnership with the Center for Nonprofit Management completed in Fall 2020. Recommendations included modifying days and hours of service to take into account client work or childcare responsibilities and consideration of expanding program eligibility to those living just above the poverty line. Taking this feedback into account and in light of the pandemic, we eased restrictions on eligibility for the Foodbank so that all who currently are in need may receive critical services, as well as partnered with local organizations to expand the reach and offer diversity in delivery of Emergency Foodbank distribution. Our ultimate goal is to ensure our services are accessible for those that are in need.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

MEND
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

MEND

Board of directors
as of 6/30/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Ron Villafana

State Comp. Insurance Fund (ret.)

Term: 2018 - 2021


Board co-chair

Mr. Robert Rawitch

Rawitch Consulting

Term: 2019 - 2021

Steve Brown

Real Estate Investment & Finance

Ron Villafana

State Compensation Insurance Fund (ret.)

Jason Horstman

JP Morgan Chase

Robert Rawitch

Rawitch Consulting

Virginia Tanawong

NBC Universal

Roshan Ghaznavi

Merrill Lynch

Paula Bahamon

Mission Valley Bank

Janice Boafo

County of Ventura Human Services

Sofia Bowden

ASGN, Inc.

Manoj Mathew

ACE Medical Associates

Fred Ruopp, Jr.

Chelsea Management

Gabriela Perez

Home Street Bank

David Jones

Lewitt Hackman

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/14/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/11/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.