World Vegetable Center

Healthier lives, more resilient livelihoods through greater diversity in what we grow and eat

aka WorldVeg   |   Shanhua, --   |  https://avrdc.org

Mission

WorldVeg conducts research and development activities to realize the potential of vegetables for healthier lives and more resilient livelihoods. We strive to achieve faster, greater and lasting positive impact on the nutritional status, incomes and well-being of people--particularly in Africa and Asia--based on quality, long-term and complementary partnerships in vegetable science and development.

Ruling year info

1973

Director General

Dr. Marco Wopereis

Deputy Director General - Research

Dr. David Johnson

Main address

60 Yi Min Liao World Vegetable Center

Shanhua, -- 74151 Taiwan

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

AVRDC - The World Vegetable Center

Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center (AVRDC)

EIN

23-7320169

NTEE code info

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (K05)

International Agricultural Development (Q31)

Management & Technical Assistance (K02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Many organizations around the world are committed to reducing hunger -- but the World Vegetable Center is specifically focused on eliminating "hidden hunger," or micronutrient deficiencies in the human diet. Previous global emphasis on increasing the production of staples has resulted in less diverse diets. Without sufficient micronutrients in the diet, children fail to thrive and adults struggle to learn and earn. Vegetables are the best source of the vital micronutrients people need for good health. WorldVeg promotes the benefits of vegetables as part of a balanced diet, and develops specific health-promoting properties of particular vegetables.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Our strategic focus

The World Vegetable Center’s R&D activities, conducted through partnerships worldwide, are guided in particular by nine of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

WorldVeg strives to achieve faster, greater and lasting positive impact on the nutritional status, incomes, and well-being of people—particularly in Africa and Asia—based on quality, long-term complementary partnerships in vegetable science and development.

The Center implements its science for development agenda through three outcome-oriented ‘flagship programs’: Safe and Sustainable Value Chains, Healthy Diets, and Vegetable Diversity and Improvement, and
one cross-cutting flagship program: Enabling Impact.

These flagship programs emerged from partner consultations in 2016 and extensive discussions among Center staff and are based on relative strengths, identified trends, and potential for impact. They bring together WorldVeg staff and partners from the public and private sector, from research and development organizations, and from farmer organizations and civil society. They are gateways to achieving outcomes and impact and each is operationalized through two to four ‘innovation clusters’.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

WorldVeg builds quality partnerships in research and development to increase the production and consumption of safe, nutritious and health-promoting vegetables for faster, greater and lasting positive impact on the nutritional status, incomes, and well-being of people, particularly youth and women in Africa and Asia.

WorldVeg research provides small-scale farmers with the knowledge, skills, technologies, and opportunities to boost their vegetable yields and increase their incomes.

Our activities aim to strengthen the entire vegetable value chain to unleash the economic and nutritional power of vegetables, from breeding and vegetable seed systems to market access and awareness of the need for a healthy diet.

WorldVeg has established a clear and measurable set of outcome targets through discovery, piloting and scaling activities and continuous improvement of a coherent set of products and services.

The WorldVeg Genebank is at the heart of our organization. WorldVeg maintains the world’s largest public sector collection of vegetable seed, comprising more than 61,000 accessions of 440 species. The WorldVeg Genebank includes globally important vegetables as well as more than 10,000 accessions of hardy traditional vegetables. Our Seed Repository in Arusha, Tanzania holds more than 2,700 accessions, 78% of which are traditional crops.

We have three outcome-oriented "flagships" that interact with our genebank:

Vegetable Diversity and Improvement
Healthy Diets
Safe and Sustainable Value Chains

and one cross-cutting flagship:

Enabling Impact

View our strategic plan at:

http://worldveg.tind.io/record/57792/files/World%20Vegetable%20Center%20Strategic%20Plan%202017-2025.pdf?version=1

WorldVeg has 400 well-trained, dedicated staff. We operate from our 112-hectare headquarters research farm in Taiwan and through five regional offices (Thailand, India, Tanzania, Mali and Benin) and numerous project offices worldwide.

Our 60 internationally recruited plant breeders, pathologists, germplasm curators, socioeconomic experts, nutritionists, field trainers and more are well-respected in their fields and dedicated to achieving outcomes and impact.

WorldVeg has developed more than 600 climate-resilient vegetables adapted to higher temperatures and more extreme weather.

Our researches continue to work on species suited to specific production systems. They breed pest- and disease-resistant vegetables to reduce the need for pesticides, enhance the nutritional quality of vegetables, and explore the untapped possibilities of traditional vegetables for nutrition and income generation.

We're investigating traditional vegetables as important sources of nutrients for underserved populations worldwide.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We use feedback from project participants to develop targeted information and training materials that better suit their situation and needs.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

World Vegetable Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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World Vegetable Center

Board of directors
as of 10/8/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Dr. Junne-Jih Chen

Taiwan Agricultural Research Institute

Term: 2011 -


Board co-chair

Dr. Masa Iwanaga

Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS)

Term: 2016 -

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes