BAY AREA GIRLS ROCK CAMP

MUSIC. COMMUNITY. POWER.

Oakland, CA   |  www.bayareagirlsrockcamp.org

Mission

Bay Area Girls Rock Camp is a nonprofit dedicated to empowering girls through music, promoting an environment that fosters self-confidence, creativity and collaboration. Through music lessons, workshops, group activities and performance, girls acquire
skills that help guide them throughout their lives.

Ruling year info

2009

Principal Officer

Olivia Gonzalez

Co Principal Officer

Jennifer Pei Huang

Main address

PO Box 72213

Oakland, CA 94612 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-0807690

NTEE code info

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Music Groups, Bands, Ensembles (A6C)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BAGRC believes that youth empowerment rooted in history, affirmation, compassion, emotional intelligence, and responsiveness to the process of self-identification allows us to build a grounded culture of listening and leading with girls/TGNC experiences, which in turn plants the seeds of long-term intergenerational solutions to the oppression of youth.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Girls Rock Summer Camp

Our summer camp is a three-session, month-long program for girls and gender expansive youth ages 8-18. Campers attend instrument lessons, form a band, collaboratively write an original song, participate in daily music and empowerment-related workshops, and perform with their band at a live showcase at the end of the week.

Population(s) Served
Young women
Girls
LGBTQ people
Economically disadvantaged people
Artists and performers

Girls Rock After School Program (GRASP) is a 10-week program for girls 8-18 years old. Students attend instrument lessons, form a band, collaboratively write an original song, participate in workshops, and perform with their band at a live showcase.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Girls
LGBTQ people
Economically disadvantaged people
Artists and performers

BAGRC will serves young adults (16-21) through our 1-session summer program, Adult Rock Camp (ARC). ARCoffers our older youth and young parent community direct mentorship to pursue career pathways as arts professionals. Instrument instruction, forming a band, writing an original song, and performing in a concert will be used to model the following outcomes: shifting gender norms that exclude women/TGNC young adults in the arts; building pre-employment skills and financial stability through affinity-based, multigenerational mentorships and representation.

Population(s) Served
Artists and performers
Girls
LGBTQ people
Families
Parents

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Bay Area Girls Rock Camp is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that empowers young people through music, promoting an environment that fosters self-confidence, creativity and teamwork. Our camp centers the experiences of girls, trans and/or non-binary youth in our explicit commitment to gender justice and creating an inclusive environment that supports a wide range of marginalized gender identities and expressions.

BAGRC challenges gender stereotypes, encourages collaboration and tolerance among peers, and provides a comfortable space for people of all backgrounds to express themselves. Through music lessons, workshops, group activities, and performances, rock campers acquire skills that help guide them throughout their lives.

1) Multigenerational learning environments where conflict resolution is available to youth. Girls/TGNC youth are at greater risk of generational impact of unsafe/unhealthy relationships. Programs aim to foster safe spaces between girls/TGNC youth, young adults, and adult support which can model expectations of health/safety.

2) Shifting gender norms that exclude and isolate girls/TGNC youth. Curriculum is built with partner organizations to teach youth how to recognize a relationship continuum from healthy to unhealthy to abusive, and what structural violence/racism looks like. Youth are offered historical context for LGBTQ+ community arts, and are encouraged to express their identities through music and otherwise in the program.

3) Affinity-based collaborative learning and representation. Programs incorporate a BIPOC-centered curriculum. By prioritizing belonging for youth marginalized in girl-centered programs, youth were able to reflect on differences, expectations, and assumptions placed onto them by dominant media and culture, and feel into a mutuality of kinship and likeness.

4) Continuity of services for overlooked age groups. Expanding ARC fills in the gap of youth aged 18-24 who experience a lack of resources, particularly when transitioning between school system and workforce. Programs aim to foster safe spaces between girls/TGNC youth which can model expectations of health/safety, as well as build social support amongst peers and adults for potential interventions in harm.

5) Interdependence through affinity-based collaborative learning. All learning environments are held in circles and prioritize belonging for youth marginalized in girl-centered programs. Youth are able to reflect on differences, expectations, and assumptions placed onto them by dominant media and culture, and construct interconnected, lasting networks that will assist them in future employment pursuits.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our programs fulfill a unique need: girl/LGBTQ-centered programming. This is particularly important in music; many low-income youth lack access to arts enrichment programs in schools and girls/gender-expansive youth routinely feel alienated from music due to discrimination within the field. Few pursue higher education in music, with reports that only 32% of Berklee College of Music’s students are women. Based on comprehensive data, the US Department of Justice concludes that arts programs can help girls “overcome patterns of silence and passivity,” while empowerment training helps girls recognize their strengths and achieve a greater sense of their own value and competency, all which are reflected in our program outcomes.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    BAGRC models inclusive spaces and affinity groups for girls to foster safety; adequately resourcing these spaces; creating spaces where TGNC youth can receive care and mentorship; hiring TGNC people to make spaces safe; and nurturing and investing in TGNC artists and their storytelling. Youth who attend our programs are integrated into an intergenerational community-based support system, while using strengths-based pedagogy to encourage girls/TGNC youth to identify their needs, find their leadership, and amplify their voice. A notable recent change includes partnerships and curriculum development towards Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC)-centered curriculum, which will be carried forward as a staple of our programs to build affinity-based learning environments and representation.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    BAGRC successfully operates with a horizontal, non-hierarchical structure. All personnel reflect the demographics of youth, contributing to their sense of visibility as leaders. Mentors attend a full day of training designed by Staff in conjunction with AORTA prior to each program session to build strengths-based practices for girls'/LGBTQ empowerment, building multicultural communities, and creating inclusive learning environments for marginalized youth. We are always working on increasing the representation of the community we serve on our Board and Staff, and are happy to report that after over a decade of successful programs in Oakland, we are a community-based and community-run organization.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

BAY AREA GIRLS ROCK CAMP
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

BAY AREA GIRLS ROCK CAMP

Board of directors
as of 03/03/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kendal Blum

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/3/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Non-binary
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/03/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.