Human Services

ADVOCATES FOR ADOLESCENT MOTHERS

  • Chicago, IL
  • www.advocatesforadolescentmothers.com

Mission Statement

Advocates for Adolescent Mothers is committed to empowering young parents by providing them with the tools, resources, and support needed to break the cycle of poverty, establish prosperity, and prevent child abuse.

Main Programs

  1. Educational Empowerment Program
  2. Teen Parent Stable Housing Study
  3. Holiday Drive Program
  4. Advocacy Through Art
Service Areas

Self-reported

Illinois

Our services are currently available to Illinois residents. Our goal is to offer our evidence based programs nationally.

ruling year

2009

Principal Officer

Self-reported

Lillian Harris

Keywords

Self-reported

scholarship, teen mom, adolescent parents, women, children, poverty, antipoverty, homelessness, advocacy, housing, child welfare, child abuse prevention, prevention, intervention, assets, education

Also Known As

AFAM

EIN

26-2043670

 Number

1039601471

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Family Services (Adolescent Parents) (P45)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The outcomes of Advocates for Adolescent Mothers Educational Empowerment Program produces results that give evidence to the participant's progress in breaking the cycle of poverty. Educational Empowerment Program participant outcomes include enhanced decision making skills, effective study habits, greater knowledge of child development, delayed subsequent pregnancies, and maintaining a minimum 2.0 GPA. Each of our active participants have met or exceeded these expectations. Our Educational Empowerment Program has currently produced 3 young mom college graduates who have earned bachelor's degrees, and we are working to increase that number each year.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Educational Empowerment Program

Less than 2% of teen mothers earn a college degree before the age of 30. Education is one of the most powerful weapons against poverty, yet many young mothers do not have access to adequate support as they endeavor to earn their college degrees.

The Educational Empowerment Program is an asset-based antipoverty program that provides financial and socio-emotional support to young mothers who are in college. The Educational Empowerment Program is designed to equip young parents to break the poverty cycle by preventing child abuse, educating them about child development; providing entrepreneurial training; and increasing the number of young mothers who graduate from college, by addressing specific barriers that often prevent college completion.

Participants of the Educational Empowerment Program receive mentoring, participate in informational workshops, establish long and short-term goals, and are offered financial support each academic year.

Advocates for Adolescent Mothers is one of the only U.S. organizations that provides a systemic and integrated approach to poverty reduction among this population by offering holistic and comprehensive support to teen and young mom college students. The support offered through the Educational Empowerment Program can provide young moms a greater pathway out of poverty than the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), a federal program acknowledged for boosting families out of poverty.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

None

Budget

Program 2

Teen Parent Stable Housing Study

Many teen mothers and their children encounter homelessness, yet this issue has been under-investigated. Available research about homelessness among young parents indicate that:
• Forty percent of homeless youth in Illinois have 1 or more children;
• Children of homeless teen mothers are 3 times more likely to experience homelessness as adults more than once;
• Sixty percent of homeless teen mothers have experienced homelessness 7 times or more.

Research is critical to the development of social welfare policy, influential to the allotment of federal funding, and vital to the provision of social services. Advocates for Adolescent Mothers research is a tactical approach toward advocating for young parents.
The Teen Parent Stable Housing Study is a longitudinal study through which administrative data is collected about the prevalence of homelessness among young mothers in multiple cities nationally, beginning in Chicago. Organizations that provide services to young mothers are the participants of the Teen Parent Stable Housing Study. Participating organizations receive ongoing technical assistance from Advocates for Adolescent Mothers.

Category

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Homeless

Budget

Program 3

Holiday Drive Program

Advocates for Adolescent Mothers Holiday Drive program delivers compassion to homeless and underprivileged youth at Christmas.

Our Holiday Drive program begins with the collection of toys and outerwear, culminates with our Holiday Social, and ends with the Holiday Party, where we deliver the gifts to the young moms and their children.

Category

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Homeless

Budget

Program 4

Advocacy Through Art

Advocacy Through Art is a program in partnership with After School Matters, serving college bound young mom high school students. This program will service the first group of students summer 2016. Participants explore various forms of art and learn to use art as a form of self expression and an instrument of advocacy. Other topics including etiquette, college prep, financial literacy, and child developmental milestones are covered during this program.

Category

Arts, Culture & Humanities

Population(s) Served

Female Youth/Adolescents (14 - 19 years)

Budget

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Number of accolades/recognition received from third-party organizations

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
AFAM has been recognized as a Top Rated Women's Organization by GreatNonprofits since 2011. We maintained silver status with GuideStar from 2013 until we earned gold status in 2015.

2. Number of volunteers

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

3. Number of clients served

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

4. Hours of mentoring

Target Population
Adolescents (13-19 years), At-risk youth, Students

Connected to a Program?
Educational Empowerment Program
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Participants of our Educational Empowerment Program receive mentoring.

5. Number of public events held to further mission

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

6. Number of research studies conducted

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
Teen Parent Stable Housing Study
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Advocates for Adolescent Mothers Teen Parent Stable Housing Study is a longitudinal study about the prevalence of homelessness among young mothers in Chicago.

7. Number of curricula designed

Target Population
Adolescents (13-19 years), At-risk youth, Students

Connected to a Program?
Educational Empowerment Program
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

8. Percent of young mom college student participants who maintain a 2.0 GPA or higher

Target Population
Adolescents (13-19 years), At-risk youth, Students

Connected to a Program?
Educational Empowerment Program
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Educational Empowerment Participants are required to maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher. One hundred percent of active participants have maintained a minimum 2.0 GPA since the program started.

9. Percent of young mom college students who delayed a subsequent pregnancy

Target Population
Adolescents (13-19 years), Parents, Students

Connected to a Program?
Educational Empowerment Program
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Participants are empowered to delay additional pregnancies until they are prepared to financially, emotionally, & physically meet the demands of parenting more than 1 child and have graduated college.

10. Percent of young mom college students who secured a FT job within 3 months of program completion/college graduation

Target Population
Females, Parents, Students

Connected to a Program?
Educational Empowerment Program
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
As of May 2016, we have assisted 3 young mom college students to graduate with bachelor's degrees. Each of these young moms secured FT employment within 3 months of graduating.

11. Percent of young mom college students who have graduated with a bachelor's degree upon program completion

Target Population
Females, Parents, Students

Connected to a Program?
Educational Empowerment Program
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
As of May 2016, we have assisted 3 young mom college students to graduate with bachelor's degrees. Our first two participants graduated in spring 2015.

12. Number of stories successfully placed in the media

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
In 2010 our founder was a guest on Charity Chat. In 2011, she was featured in the Examiner, "Meet curvy philanthropist Lillian Harris". In 2012, she was featured on The LOVE Perspective radio show.

13. Number of print, radio, or online ads developed

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
In 2015 AFAM's Holiday Drive Program was marketed on iHeart media radio stations and website. In 2010, our Back to School Celebration was featured in radio ads.

14. Number of meetings with policymakers or candidates

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Back to School Celebration: Alderman Fioretti makes opening speech in 2010; Alderman Cochran supports & makes speech in 2012. In 2014 our founder speaks with US Sen Durbin's staff in Washington, D.C.

15. Number of policymakers or candidates reached

Target Population
No target populations selected

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Our founder receives letter reply from President Barack Obama.

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    As part of our mission to help young parents break the cycle of poverty, it is one of our primary goals to increase the number of young mothers who earn college degrees, a goal addressed by our Educational Empowerment Program.
    A few more specific outcomes for participants of our program include:
    -delayed subsequent pregnancies;
    -active enrollment in an accredited college or university;
    -maintaining a GPA of 2.0 or higher;
    -establishing long and short-term goals.

    Our organization also aims to advocate for young parents regarding issues that impact families headed by young parents.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    We accomplish the goals of our Educational Empowerment Program by engaging participants at regular workshops and by providing mentorship.

    The research we produce is one of our ongoing methods of advocacy. Our advocacy is also performed by community outreach, as well as various publications and campaigns that disseminate information about families headed by young parents to increase awareness and minimize stigmatism.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Advocates for Adolescent Mothers has a tactical approach for accomplishing our antipoverty mission, as demonstrated by our current and planned programs including the Educational Empowerment program.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Our progress is measured by benchmarks especially including participants' compliance with program requirements (e.g. minimum GPA), results of evaluations, and pre-/post-tests.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Since 2009, our accomplishments have included:

    • Earning GuideStar Exchange Gold status in 2016.
    • Earning GuideStar Exchange Gold status in 2015.
    • Earning the Top-Rated Women's Charity status from GreatNonprofits for a 5th consecutive year in 2015.
    • Producing our first 3 college graduates who earned bachelor's degrees as of May 2016.
    • Contributing to the development of the Chicago Department of Public Health's Action Plan for Healthy Adolescents in 2014.
    • Maintaining status as a GuideStar Exchange Silver nonprofit through 2015.
    • Being selected as a GoodCity incubator program 2012.
    • Providing internships to 5 graduating college seniors from Loyola University and Columbia College.
    • Distributing more than $3400 in financial support to young mothers in college through our Educational Empowerment Program, which started in 2011.
    • Providing approximately 1200 toys and 700 coats to homeless and underprivileged young moms and children for Christmas since 2011.
    • Providing backpacks and school supplies to approximately 200 young moms and other underprivileged youth from 2010-2012.

    Advocates for Adolescent Mothers was founded with the intention of providing supportive housing for homeless young mothers and their children. We have not yet been able to establish the supportive housing program.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Illinois

Our services are currently available to Illinois residents. Our goal is to offer our evidence based programs nationally.

Social Media

External Reviews

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Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

ADVOCATES FOR ADOLESCENT MOTHERS

Leadership

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Principal Officer

Lillian Harris

BIO

Lillian Harris is a socially conscious and philanthropic seasoned leader. Lillian has been championing the empowerment of youth and young parents since 1997.

Since becoming a federally recognized NGO in 2009, Lillian Harris has led Advocates for Adolescent Mothers (AFAM) to establish a solid mission, accomplished by innovative and comprehensive programming. AFAM has awarded more than $3400 in financial assistance to young mom college students since fall 2011, three of which have graduated with bachelor's degrees. The organization has also delivered approximately 1200 toys and nearly 700 coats to homeless young moms and children at Christmas over the past 5 years.

As a leader in the nonprofit industry, Lillian's work has earned national accreditation for two Chicago area charities. As an eloquent and engaging speaker with a powerful story of defying the odds, Lillian has been the keynote speaker for multiple charitable events nationally. As a recognized advocate for empowering communities, Lillian has been honored with a national award from the Healthy Teen Network, and multiple local awards from entities including Zeta Phi Beta Xi Mu Zeta sorority and the Top Ladies of Distinction organization. In 2012, Lillian became StartingBloc Fellow, a globally competitive fellowship for emanating and promising social entrepreneurs.

Lillian is skilled at quickly building rapport with others and engaging community stakeholders. She has filled advisory roles with DePaul University and Guidestar, and recently completed a term as a Chicago Public Schools Local School Council member. Lillian is also the principal investigator of a University of Chicago Institutional Review Board approved qualitative study about homelessness among young mothers in Chicago.

In 2014, Lillian decided to pursue her long time interest in real estate and returned to school to earn an MBA with a concentration in Real Estate. She is the recipient of the CREW Chicago & Chicago Association of Realtors Scholarships. Lillian earned her realtor's license in 2014 and construction management certification from the Turner School of Construction Management in 2015.

Lillian is excited about combining her passions for poverty reduction and real estate to create solutions that empower communities.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Lillian Harris

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?