A CHILDS HOPE INTERNATIONAL INC

A bridge of hope to the children of the world

aka Hands Against Hunger   |   Cincinnati, OH   |  www.TheChildrenAreWaiting.org

Mission

The mission of A Child’s Hope Int’l is to motivate and mobilize the church and the community to care for the orphans and vulnerable childrem in their distress. This includes the children within U.S. foster care, the orphans of the world and marginalized children suffering from hunger, thirst and poverty.

Notes from the nonprofit

The 5 year strategic plan for A Child's Hope Int'l established three primary goals: 1. Increase the number of orphans vulnerable children from 10,000 a day to 20,000 per day who would receive high protein food, clean drinking water and life giving hope supplies. 2. Double the level of adoption and foster care advocacy and support. 3. Establish a second location for Hope Factory II to support increased production and additional Red Shirt Team members. In 2020, the COVID worldwide pandemic effected far greater numbers of children than ever before. As a result, A Child's Hope Int'l accelerated the 5 year plan by doubling the production to help 20,000 children a day. To meet this demand in the absence of volunteers, A Child's Hope Int'l contracted with a food processing company to meet the demand with the excess capacity on their machines. As a result, 15 countries received life saving supplies so they could sustain 20,000 orphans and vulnerable children a day - every day.

Ruling year info

2009

Executive Director

Mr. Lawrence Bergeron

Main address

2430 East Kemper Road

Cincinnati, OH 45241 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-2650611

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (W01)

International Relief (Q33)

Adoption (P31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We exist because the children are waiting - children in our own community and children around the world. Waiting children include over 143 million orphans in the world; another 500,000 children in foster care in the United States; the 30,000 children who perish daily from the effects of severe malnutrition and disease brought on by hunger, and the 4,500 children dying daily from drinking dirty water.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adoption & Foster Care Advocacy

As advocates for adoption and foster care, we inform and engage the church and community with information, resources and support

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

We provide nutritious food and clean water every day for more than 10,000 orphans and vulnerable children throughout the world.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2011

Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA) 2010

Charities Review Council 2019

Charity Navigator 2020

Awards

Torch Award Honoree 2017

Better Business Bureau

Affiliations & memberships

Christian Alliance for Orphans 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

With this data we measure the number of meals funded, packed, and shipped to feed orphans and vulnerable children. 2017 data reflects a higher than normal demand from one partner that year.

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This data measures cash donations only. It excludes gifts in kind.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Humanitarian Relief

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Gallons of water provided to those without access to clean water

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent, People of Asian descent, People of Latin American descent, People of Middle Eastern descent

Related Program

Humanitarian Relief

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

A Child's Hope Int'l is focused on the four bridges of care defined in our founding documents: adoption, foster care, orphan care and humanitarian relief. Our advocacy efforts strive to see every church and community wrap around at least one disadvantaged child. We are convinced that one individual child will eventually become five, ten, and even more children embraced by the church and the community.
In foster care, we help churches within the community work together to provide licensed, qualified, and supportive homes. When a child in their jurisdiction needs immediate foster care, the church can provide one - immediately. In addition, this foster care family would experience wrap around support from others meeting their physical, emotional, legal, and spiritual needs. The child would be cared for in their community and not be forced to move geographically or away from their siblings.
Adoption is a wonderful way to begin or grow a family. Our organization continues to advocate for adoption, educating the public AND providing resources to help families that are interested. The A Child’s Hope adoption fund was established for that purpose and has helped several families with grants. We look to expand the funds available for adoption and have published the book Journey to the Fatherless (www.JourneytotheFatherless.com) for that purpose.
The number of interested adoptive families is much smaller than the universe of orphans. As such, un-adopted children need to be cared for enabling them to not only survive but to thrive and strive for a better life. These children need consistent, nourishing food, medical care, protective environments and educational resources. Our organization meets these needs for orphans in several countries with a plan to increase.
Our humanitarian relief programs continue to be an extremely important program engaging volunteers of all ages and abilities. Our high protein food program (called Hands Against Hunger®) has produced almost 50 million meals, requiring over 5000 tons of supplies while engaging over 120,000 volunteers. The program has been affectionately called Cincinnati's Most Interactive Charitable Organization. Hands Against Hunger™ food packs are combined with our Hope Life Packs™ and Hope Water Packs™ which provide clean drinking water solutions to desperately thirsty children. Hope Water Packs™ are supported through our Promise Water™ program which promises to produce at least one million gallons of clean drinking water every year,
In the past few years, our high protein food program has been embraced by the Cincinnati Free Store Food and other social service agencies providing a quality food product to disadvantaged people within our communities.
Within our local community we also provide Hope Sacks™ for 200 high-risk children in a local school who would not otherwise have access to nutritious food on the weekends. As a result, we provide hunger-free weekends for children in the Cincinnati area.

In order to expand high protein food and safe drinking water programs, we will continue to develop strategic relationships within the community for volunteerism and funding. We can feed a child for just 25¢ a day because of our commitment to a low overhead, volunteer intensive operation.
Our advocacy goals for adoption and foster care remain extremely important. These goals do not rely upon volunteers as much but do require more creative communication and marketing programs. It is our desire to develop social media strategies that are more effective and creative. As well as training materials and partnerships with other likeminded organizations that can expand our reach and effectiveness. Our strategy continues to leverage the resources of Journey to the Fatherless™ which were designed with the church in mind.
The challenges we face in a difficult economy are not unlike those other non-profit corporations face. We endeavor to maintain a high ratio of donor contributions to program expenses. Our current average is above 90% and that achievement is matched with a corresponding list of achievements which we believe is a better metric to measure effectiveness.
We ask the question: How effective have we been with donor dollars in helping the children we serve locally, regionally and internationally? The answer represents far more than percentages – it represents the returns seen with the investments of every donated dollar.
As a result of donor support, we are able to:
• Feed 20,000 children a day – every day with no government support
• Maintain 25c a serving over 10 years even as other food costs have risen sharply
• Produce over 8 million gallons of clean drinking water for less than a ¼ of a penny a glass
• Ship over 5000 tons of high protein food with a 99+% delivery rate
• Assemble by hand almost 50 million high protein meals
• Recruit over 120,000 volunteers without paid advertising
• Operate without debt while maintaining strong accreditations with major independent agencies
• Help several families adopt an orphan from foster care or internationally with financial grants
• Provide tons of humanitarian aid such as clothing, blankets, medical supplies and shelter items
• Educate thousands from the community on the plight of the orphan with opportunities to serve
• Recruit a large group of special volunteers (called the Red Shirt Team) who serve others
• Sustain a 96% ratio of Red Shirt Team volunteers to staff
Many consider A Child’s Hope Int’l to be very effective in managing costs and overhead. And rightfully so – but the results shown above are the best measure of what can be done with the funds donated to us by those who care about orphans and vulnerable children.

A Child's Hope Int'l has established a set of deliberate capabilities that leverage our unique strengths and abilities.
These capabilities are measured in terms of:
1. Quality
2. Value
3. Experience
4. Resources
5. Logistics

Quality
Our highly acclaimed Hope Boxes™ are the most visible and demanding program in our portfolio of services. As such, the quality of the individual product ingredients is paramount. For that reason, we purchase the highest quality supplies in all categories (ingredients and packaging) to ensure that the marginalized child is getting the best product. A less expensive product, with less quality could be offered but we believe these children matter and deserve the best we can produce.

Value
Unlike other programs that provide a “food only” solution, our goal is to nourish the body and the soul with a unique, holistic solution. We essentially deliver a 3-dimensional solution: food, water and life supplies within the same physical container. Whether this is a single Hope Box™ or a sea going container of Hope Boxes™, the product is the same. We increase the value of the container for only pennies a serving beyond a food only solution. Thereby increasing the value of the delivered product.

Experience
The ability to deliver an effective, meaningful and high impact program requires that the volunteer experience be above expectations for comparable programs. It is our goal to “raise the bar” above what volunteers normally experience when they serve with other volunteer organizations. We are committed to a delivering and refining a multi-dimensional program that demonstrates the core value that volunteers matter. From their initial contact with the organization to their exit from the Hope Factory™, we strive to engage all of their senses in becoming solution providers.

Resources
It would be impractical as well as unaffordable to hire staff for all the roles required within A Child's Hope Int'l. It is for that reason, that we have developed a staffing model that engages large numbers of the community and transforms them into solution providers. As a result, more orphans and vulnerable children can be affected with more of the donor contributions being delivered to program expenses.
The model is built upon a qualified but limited crew (paid staff), a core team (a small number of experienced volunteers), a committed group of Red Shirt Team members and thousands of casual volunteers who want to serve.

Logistics
To be an effective, ongoing solution provider requires resources and logistics. Logistics includes capabilities in planning, research and delivery to various parts of the world. It involves warehousing, inventory control, customs documents, shipping manifests, government agency approvals, freight handling and scheduling so that a container of 300,000 high protein meals and 100,000 gallons of clean water capacity can be delivered where it needs to be on time and without loss to the client or A Child's Hope Int'l.

Progress is measured through our Key Performance Indicators. These include: the number of churches involved; the number of volunteers who serve; the number of orphans and vulnerable children whose lives have improved; and the amount of financial support raised.

Our five-year goal includes doubling the number of children receiving support from A Child's Hope Int'l from 10,000 a day to 20,000 a day as well as substantially increasing our presence of support in adoption and foster care. In 2020 we met the goal of feeding 20,000 hungry children per day.

Since ACHI began in Cincinnati over 13 years ago, over 100 orphans have been adopted and countless others have been fostered in Christian homes. 20,000 orphans and vulnerable children are receiving high protein food, clean drinking water and life-giving hope supplies a day, every day of the year. As of today, over 120,000 volunteers of all faiths, ages, and abilities have produced Hope Boxes™ containing food, water, and life supplies.

Contributions to the community are evaluated by the number of organizations that are engaged as solution providers and the production volume of Hands Against Hunger™ food available for distribution to the community which encompasses local, regional, and international beneficiaries. In a typical year, over 15,000 unpaid volunteers served in various capacities at the Hope Factory™ or at Mobile Sessions sponsored by A Child's Hope Int'l. This represents approximately 50,000 volunteer hours of service and does not include the volunteer commitment of the Red Shirt Team™ during the same period.

Each year over 300 distinct groups are represented as participants during Public Session events . As a sample, in 2018 participants were from 60 children’s clubs; 130 churches; over 40 businesses; over 50 schools; 43 civic minded groups; and 2 military groups. These groups, representing over 15,000 volunteers, made an astonishing number of Hope Boxes™ which included over 4.2 million high protein meals. By 2020 production had grown at the hands of volunteers to 8 million high protein meals delivered to hungry children in 15 countries.

In 2020 we developed a food packaging machine that operates daily with the help of volunteers. The Heroes of Hope Food Processing Facility enables us to continue to feed 20,000 hungry children daily even in the midst of a global pandemic. This future is focused on expansion, maintaining a debt free operation, and building a stronger organizational structure. To satisfy our goal, a second (leased) location is under consideration and the requisite equipment and supplies need purchased. During this 5-year period, the emphasis will be on community engagement and enlisting volunteers.

Going deeper with support for foster care is dependent upon more participation and engagement from churches. The goal is to conduct foster care and adoption related seminars and events in at least 25 churches. The desired outcome is at least an 80% participation rate.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    There are two primary groups who benefit from our mission. First and foremost are orphans and vulnerable children around the world who are in need of high protein food, clean water and life giving hope. Second are our hundreds of guests who visit The Hope Factory (TM) to grow in awareness of the plight of orphans and vulnerable children around the world while also actively participating in the packing of high protein food that will meet the needs of hungry children.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Field Reports,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    As a result of feedback from those we serve internationally, we have made two recent changes. One is that partners in one country reported that the clean water supplies we were sending were struggling to be fully adopted in the more rural areas. As a result, we developed training materials to be used as a train the trainer model to train people in rural areas. A second change was regarding feedback from feeding centers that they would like to have a larger bag of our product to reduce waste and labor. We now are shipping a larger bag of high protein food to them. As a result of survey data from our guests we also recently upgraded our registration system to make registration quicker and more effortless.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We want our local partners to feel empowered and to have decision making power. It is important to our organization that they have a say in what is working or is not working. It is then our task to serve them in a way that empowers them to do the actual front line work. The changes we have made help them to feel heard and to feel like an active partner. We also recognize that it is important to our guests that they would be heard and that we are responsive to their needs. We value our guests and we value their feedback. We know that those we serve are better able to see routines that may have become blind spots for us. As a result of feedback we are empowering change within the organization that removes barriers for our guests and we are much better as a result.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

A CHILDS HOPE INTERNATIONAL INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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A CHILDS HOPE INTERNATIONAL INC

Board of directors
as of 10/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Doug Peters

Chick-Fil-A

Term: 2021 - 2025

Paul Linsley

Retired

Deanna Linsley

Retired

Elizabeth Bergeron

Co-Founder

Doug Peters

Chick-fil-A

George Thankaraj

Minuteman Press

Sophia Thankaraj

WestChester Dental Group

Michael White

Retired

Lawrence Bergeron

Founder

Cameron Bernadsky

J&J Ethicon

Kelly Bernadsky

Stay at Home Mom

Karen Peters

Chick-fil-A

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Not applicable
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data