Human Services

ONE SPIRIT

  • Rapid City, SD
  • http://nativeprogress.org/

Mission Statement

ONE Spirit is a federally recognized 501(c) nonprofit organization, EIN 26-3592983. The ONE Spirit Mission is to help the Lakota meet the basic needs of their people and provide a culturally rich life for their youth. Our programs promote an intercultural relationship that recognizes that we are all related and that American Indians are an equal and valued part of our society.
The goal of all programs is to reduce or eliminate hunger, replace the high drop out and suicide rates among youth with an enthusiasm for learning and a pride in their Lakota heritage; and, provide protection from the winter cold that can drop to 40 below zero. The plan is to create programs that will be sustained by the Lakota people.

Main Programs

  1. Food Program
  2. Heat and Home Repair
  3. Youth Program
  4. Sponsorship Program
  5. Okini Program
Service Areas

Self-reported

South Dakota

The Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota is part of a larger territory established for the Lakota in 1868 by the United States government and later parceled out to non-Native homesteaders and broken up into smaller tribal reservations. Today, Pine Ridge Reservation is home to about 40,000 Native Americans. According to the US Census Bureau(http://factfinder.census.gov/home/aian/index.html) , the reservations lie within the poorest counties in the United States.

ruling year

2009

Director since 2005

Self-reported

Jeri Baker

Asst. Director since 2005

Self-reported

Diane Capalario

Keywords

Self-reported

AmericanIndians, Lakota, food, heat, and youthprograms, sponsorship, Okini programs, home repair

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EIN

26-3592983

Physical Address

521 Kansas City Street

Rapid City, SD 57701

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

One Spirit food program now reaches more than 2500 Lakota people each month with fresh fruit, vegetables, and meat and is setting a plan in place to evolve into a food co-op that provides traditional foods.
The youth programs have built a "Safe House" for youth, provided teepees and a swimming pool to the New Warrior Camps, supported traditional cultural rides, a running program, and sent 5 Lakota athletes to the New York City Marathon.
Over 1000 children and elders have sponsors who help to meet their basic needs for food and clothing. These sponsors, families and elders have direct contact, developing an intercultural understanding and appreciation.
The wood program provides employment so men can earn money in a good way to care for their families. In so doing, more than 120 elders and families were warm last winter.
Through the Okini program, more than 300 families received urgently needed clothes and household items.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Food Program

ONE
Spirit and the Lakota people are joining efforts to bring an
end to hunger and diet related disease by providing fresh fruit,
vegetables and meat to families and elders in need. Through the
generosity of sponsors, the ONE Spirit food program delivers food that
is both high quality and highly nutritional. During the summer months,
seasonal garden produce and freshly processed chickens are obtained from
local farms. Frozen meat, fruits and vegetables are supplied during the
winter.
Each month, ONE Spirit arranges for food to be transported to the Pine Ridge reservation where members of the Lakota community then unload the truck, sort the food into orders and personally deliver them throughout the reservation.  The community workers typically dedicate two long days to complete deliveries, travelling hundreds of miles over unmaintained roads and even taking orders into the homes of elders and putting it away for them. The workers are paid with food and are supplied with gas for the deliveries.  Currently, more than 2700 people are fed each month. However that number continues to increase as more people request to become part of the program. On a daily basis, we receive many urgent requests for food for elders, families and children.

Category

Human Services, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Native Americans/American Indians

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Budget

130000.00

Program 2

Heat and Home Repair

Every winter on Pine Ridge Reservation, families and elders go without heat in their homes or warm themselves in front of an oven. Winters on the reservation can see temperatures dip to 40 degrees below zero. Last winter during one of the several blizzards, the tribal police asked that we deliver wood to a family with six children.The family was burning their clothes to keep warm.    Each year, the One Spirit wood program delivers more than 150 loads of wood to elders and families. Many of the Lakota use only wood for heating and cooking. The men start delivering wood as soon as cold weather begins. Families and elders who live well below the poverty line receive the wood free but many still give a small sum to help with gas for the program. One Spirit pays the men $100 per load of wood delivered. In addition to cutting, splitting and delivering wood; the men who work with the program have repaired doors and windows, installed electric water heaters, repaired or replaced roofs, and helped to winterize homes. The Wood Program:Stocks up wood and delivers it to elders and families throughout the winter.Ensures that on the reservations where temperatures can dip to 40 degrees below zero, people will have heat.Repairs and winterizes homes to conserve heat and make the homes more livable.Provides employment to Native American men and women who must support families even though unemployment is at 90%.Allows the Lakota people to take care of themselves and their people.

Category

Human Services, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Native Americans/American Indians

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

$20,000.00

Program 3

Youth Program

Youth Programs

A Safe House. This home provides a safe environment for Lakota children who have had to leave their homes for any number of reasons- drugs, alcohol, or violence, in the environment. The home accommodates between 15-20 youth. While there they are given loving care, immersed in their cultural traditions, provided with mentoring and tutoring, and protected from drugs, alcohol and gangs.
It is planned to have this home replicated throughout the reservation.

Support of cultural events. One Spirit supports cultural horseback rides that teach the youth the values and history of the Lakota people; participation in traditional dances and ceremonies; and the New Warrior Camps that emphasize the cultural values and immerse the youth in the traditions of their people.

Youth Centers. Centers for youth to be located throughout the reservation will encompass programs that can give the young people a zeal for learning, pride in themselves, and the support they need. Programs will include mentoring, tutoring, sports, music arts, computer access and counseling.

Category

Human Services, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Native Americans/American Indians

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Female Young Adults (20-25 years) -- currently not in use

Budget

$80,000.00

Program 4

Sponsorship Program

Imagine that you are:  An 80-year-old elder trying to care for your two toddler grandchildren—and you live in a one bedroom apartmentA 35-year-old single father with no job—and you lose everything in a house fireA 20-year-old single mother trying to walk 5 miles to school each day—and you have holes in the soles of your shoesA 16-year-old boy without a home—and the gangs are threatening youAn 8-year-old girl whose only shoes are flipflops—and the first snow just fellNow, imagine that you have the power to help these people directly—from your home to theirs. Well, you DO have that power through the One Spirit Sponsorship Program. The uniqueness of our sponsorship program is its DIRECT approach. Sponsors send their gifts DIRECTLY to the person they wish to receive the helperson-to-person. We have many people who have asked for hellack of resources to repair or weatherize the home, and responsibilities to care for grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Elders love to get coffee, warm sweatshirts, shoes, laundry detergent, and pantry staples.DIRECT Sponsorships for Families and ChildrenFamilies on Pine Ridge share everything. Clothing is passed around, and toys are shared by everyone. Sponsors may take on a whole family or just one child. Either way, the gifts will be shared by everyone! Families can use help with seasonal clothing changes, laundry detergent, shampoo and bath soap, toothbrushes and paste, coats, shoes, and socks. Household items, such as sheets and towels are also welcome.INDIRECT Sponsorships for the Safe House The Safe House provides a home for children of all ages.  Sponsors can be certain that their gift boxes will be put to good use by a large number of kids!  Sponsors can target their gift boxes by age, sex, or need.  For example, pants size 34-30 (young men), underwear for little girls, tee-shirts for toddlers, socks for all ages, or sweatshirts for teenaged girls.  The Safe House can also use books, games, and school supplies at any time of year. The ProgramSponsors choose how much to send and how often to send it. We recommend quarterly gift boxes. Here are some sample boxes:Sweatshirt, pair of shoes, socks, shampoo, toothpaste/brush, laundry detergent, a small toy or game (for a child or family).A pound of coffee, a pair of shoes, a coat, a flannel shirt, laundry detergent, a pair of jeans, gloves (for an elder).School supplies, pair of jeans, tee-shirt, hooded sweatshirt, socks, a pair of shoes, and a puzzle (school aged child).Underwear for girls and boys, socks for girls and boys, tee-shirts for girls and boys (Pre-teens in the Safe House).Sweatshirt, pair of shoes, socks, shampoo, toothpaste/brush, laundry detergent, a small toy or game (for a child or family).Notice that none of these sample boxes need be very expensive. What you give is up to you.

Category

Human Services, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Native Americans/American Indians

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Budget

$10,000.00

Program 5

Okini Program

The Area Service coordinators identify the neediest members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe and list their needs on the Okini program. One Spirit supporters send needed items directly to the families or elders.

Category

Human Services, General/Other

Population(s) Served

Ethnic/Racial Minorities ?-- Other Specified Group

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

1000.00

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    The goal of the food program is to eliminate hunger on the reservation and to evolve into a food co-op that provides traditional foods through an onsite meat processing facility, locally grown produce, and continued local management and direction.
    The youth programs aim to reverse the alarming statistics about Lakota youth. Through youth centers, support will be given to youth to remain in school and find pursuits that are alcohol and drug free. They will also be given the support and care of Lakota adults that can reverse the high suicide rates. The safe houses, summer camps, cultural events all are geared to provide youth with pride in their heritage and in themselves while emphasizing their role in the future of the Lakota people.
    The plans are in place for the wood program to provide both heat and home repair. Gradually it will become self-sustaining as the men move to be able to both sell wood and continue to ensure that the elders and families will have heat. They are also including increasing amount of home repair work for which they are paid.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Plans are already in place to develop a meat processing facility where buffalo and traditionally hunted animals like antelope and deer, can be processed on the reservation. The plan includes ways to have part of each animal processed be given to the food program. The food program will also offer outlets for produce grown locally. Ultimately, the program will be run as a food co-op owned and managed by the Lakota people.
    Support for changing the abysmal and alarming statistics associated with Lakota youth is being given through safe houses, youth centers, cultural immersion programs, and education. Also through sports events, the New Warrior Camps and many cultural events that are rites of passage for the youth.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    One Spirit currently has more than 3000 supporters that participate with us in all the programs. We are partners with the Lakota people and it is with them that we are able to make progress toward the long term goals of ending hunger and diet related diseases, changing the high rate of youth suicides and high school drop out to a passion for learning and a pride in their heritage. We have excellent staff who work without pay because of the passion felt for the One Spirit Mission. We have organizations both in Europe and in the US that work to support the programs. All of these resources have been with us for several years.
    One Spirit is the only organization that has been recognized by proclamation of the Lakota Tribal Council and given approval for raising funds to be used for the Lakota people.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    1. Involvement of the youth in the various programs.
    2. The number of youth in the programs who are able to remain in school.
    3. Decrease in the number of youth suicides on the reservation.
    4. Management and direction of the programs taken over by the Lakota people.
    5. Food program evolves into a food co-op utilized by the Lakota people and moves away from a charitable program.
    6. Lakota are able to process their own meat and market some of it off the reservation.
    7. Wood program evolves to be self-sustaining.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    1. More than 2700 people now receive nutritious food each month to supplement the government subsidies.
    2. Youth Safe House was completed last year and is now functioning.
    3. Youth Centers are now being planned.
    4. Young athletes are going to Marathons and are managing running programs on the reservation
    5. More than 400 young people took part in the first "run" on the reservation.
    6. More than 300 youth took part this year in the Crazy Horse Ride, a tradition cultural event that is a rite of passage for the youth.
    7. The New Warrior Camps currently serve 40 kids in the summer.
    8. More than 1000 children and elders have sponsors with whom they communicate regularly.
Service Areas

Self-reported

South Dakota

The Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota is part of a larger territory established for the Lakota in 1868 by the United States government and later parceled out to non-Native homesteaders and broken up into smaller tribal reservations. Today, Pine Ridge Reservation is home to about 40,000 Native Americans. According to the US Census Bureau(http://factfinder.census.gov/home/aian/index.html) , the reservations lie within the poorest counties in the United States.

Social Media

Funding Needs

Funds for 3 distribution centers with equipment to store and sort. Funds for refrigerated vehicle to transport. Funds to expand the food program to meet the needs. Buildings for youth centers and distribution centers vehicles for wood and home repair programs

photos




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Financials

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ONE SPIRIT
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

ONE SPIRIT

Leadership

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Director

Jeri Baker

Asst. Director

Diane Capalario

BIO

30 years Human Service experience.

Masters in Human Development

STATEMENT FROM THE Director

"One Spirit provides support for programs developed by the Lakota people to care for their people and to provide a better present and future for their youth."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mrs. Jeri A. Baker

No Affiliaton

Term: Mar 2008 - Mar 2013

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

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BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


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CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


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ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


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BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?