AFRICA WINDMILL PROJECT INC

End Hunger Grow Food

Winter Park, FL   |  www.africawindmill.org

Mission

The mission of Africa Windmill Project is to establish food security by teaching farm irrigation and sustainable agriculture practices in Malawi.

Notes from the nonprofit

Africa Windmill Project is Providing Tools & Trainings so that Malawians become Food Secure. We manufacturing irrigation windmills for gardens up to 6 acres and teach farmers how to assemble hand crank pumps. These pumps are made out of materials found at local trading centers. Irrigation enables families to grow food year round even in the dry season. Growing food year round stabilizes the nations food supply, ending hunger and creating food security.

Ruling year info

2009

Principal Officer

Mr. John Drake

Main address

John Drake PO Box 1401

Winter Park, FL 32790 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

26-3992168

NTEE code info

Agricultural Programs (K20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Almost 90% of Malawians are rural small holder farmers that rely on the rains to irrigate their gardens. Due to drought, flooding and erratic rainfall these gardens often do not supply adequate food. Families in Malawi try to irrigate year round using buckets. This type of irrigation is often futile, farmers get discourage because of lack of success and discontinue farming year round. In Malawi the gardens are the source of food for the nation. The traditional Malawian diet is nosema (maize) with vegetables (squash or sweet potatoe leaves with tomato and onion), sometimes beans or okra. They eat what they grow and water is essential for these crops.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Agriculture Clubs

Africa Windmill Project helps villages establish Agriculture Clubs to provide training and support so that every farmer has access to education and can learn how to successfully grow food year round.

Population(s) Served
Families
People of African descent

Africa Windmill Project produces Irrigation Pumps that are affordable to small holder farmers, easily maintained and manufactured from locally available materials.

Population(s) Served
Adults
People of African descent

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of acres of area indirectly controlled under cultivation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Agriculture Clubs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of families that are food secure

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Agriculture Clubs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of families using Irrigation Technology to Grow Food Year Round

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Agriculture Clubs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Africa Windmill Project wants to End Hunger, but not stop there. We believe that every family in Malawi can become food secure.
In 2017, more than 2,500 farmers received training and added 2,000 acres to their gardens, increasing their access to food and income. Participants range in age from 15 to 80 and 70% of participating farmers are women.

Africa Windmill Project manufactures Windmills made out of materials that can be found at local trading centers. These windmills are provided to lead farmers that graduate our training program and can also be purchase by organizations and communities. We also provide trainings in Club Formation & Leadership Training, Disease & Pest Control, Land Preparation, Plot layout & Planting, Procurement of Farm Inputs, Water Pumps, Irrigation Water Management & Scheduling, Principals of Conservation Agriculture, Vegetable Production, and Agribusiness Skills. We provide tools and initial inputs for dry season gardens. We teach and provide the materials for farmers to build their own hand crank pump so that every farmer can have access to irrigation equipment making dry season gardening a sustainable source of food and income for families.

Africa Windmill Project just celebrated its 10 year anniversary. Our staff is educated and trained to provide Malawians with the information and technology they need to become food secure.

Africa Windmill Project held trainings at the demonstration garden to support area villages, ministries within the government, and local organizations. Although Africa Windmill Project continued to provide irrigation trainings a majority of our trainings focused on food security and garden management. We focused on education in the areas of garden preparation, planting, fertilizing, weeding, pest control, proper irrigation and harvesting, farm management and planning and field to market opportunities.

Farmers continue to be completely self-sufficient. Gardens had grown 5 fold, Farmers' income had greatly increased (in some cases the annual household income had gone from less than $150USD to well over $1200. The farmers (men and women) continued to save a portion of the income from the previous growing seasons to provide for start up costs for their next season garden. They also stored grain for food security later in the year and for staggered sales to local markets to increase their income. They used the income to improve their living conditions, replacing roofs, flooring, sun dried bricks with fired bricks, adding doors and windows, digging domestic wells close to family compounds. These farmers also built larger grain storage buildings and used the income for educational and medical expenses for their children. Farmers that graduated from the trainings have not experienced food shortage in the last 4 years.

Agriculture Clubs have continued to work with other farmers within their village and from neighboring villages, training and teaching them about what they have learned and implemented in their gardens. Sharing irrigation pumps, seeds, fertilizer and even in some cases labor. Successful farmers have begun helping neighboring communities establish agriculture clubs. Although Africa Windmill Project continued to be in contact with the agriculture clubs it was no longer our staff teaching basic sustainable agriculture (they were handling those trainings individually), but we had begun assisting with growth inquiries and support as these farmers were going from small sustenance farmers with a 1/4 acre family garden to that of a farm operation with over an acre of planting year-round. Farmers successfully have made the these increases at their own initiative.

Africa Windmill Project manufactures windmills and teaches farmers how to build hand crank pumps. The irrigation technology that we use is made of locally available materials found at area trading centers. This irrigation technology enables farmers to grow food year round.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Small Holder Farmers in Malawi

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    There was an initial partnership with starter packs that included some seeds and fertilizer from Africa Windmill Project. After feedback from the agriculture clubs it was determined that this did more harm than good. It was determined that it was better to let the agriculture clubs provide 100% of their initial seeds and fertilizer.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The relationship and trust with the people we serve directly impacts the benefit that our service is to them.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

AFRICA WINDMILL PROJECT INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AFRICA WINDMILL PROJECT INC

Board of directors
as of 01/13/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

John Drake

no affiliation

John Drake

Green Apple Architecture

John Parker

Summit Church

Craig Petersen

EnableSoft

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/13/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data