WYOFILE

In-depth reporting about Wyoming's people, places and policy

aka wyofile.com   |   Lander, WY   |  www.wyofile.com

Mission

WyoFile produces in-depth, uncompromising, nonpartisan, public-interest journalism focused on the people, policy and places of Wyoming. WyoFile publishes its reports, analyses, investigations and editorial commentary online for desktop and mobile viewers at WyoFile.com and on numerous social media platforms. The organization also distributes its content in traditional print outlets — partner newspapers and magazines — throughout Wyoming and the inter-mountain West.

Ruling year info

2010

Chief Executive & Editor

Mr Matthew Copeland

Main address

PO Box 1099

Lander, WY 82520 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-0410642

NTEE code info

Media, Communications Organizations (A30)

Citizen Participation (W24)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (B05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Wyoming's media landscape has fractured. Whether it is radio, television or newspapers, much of Wyoming's legacy media remains stuck in an outdated competitive model. There is a lack of resources and attention paid to investigative reporting as well as broader statewide and regional perspective. Wyoming's news outlets also experience high turnover; the for-profit media model relies on cutbacks to staff and coverage, with over-reliance on recruiting young reporters who have no ties to Wyoming and serve short tenures. This results in a loss of institutional memory and local knowledge, and means there are few professional journalists who stay in Wyoming with the experience to tackle complicated issues at the peak of their careers.
An informed citizenry is essential to Wyoming's public sphere. WyoFile examines issues in ways that inform citizens and enable them to engage in civic life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Independent nonprofit journalism website

WyoFile examines issues and delivers information in ways that inform citizens and enable them to engage in civic life.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

WyoFile creates a more informed and engaged citizenry in Wyoming by producing fact-based, in-depth journalism; by building relationships with its audience; and by promoting civil discourse around the issues that matter to Wyoming. WyoFile aims to recenter and relocalize the conversation in and about Wyoming and in doing so insulate Wyoming from the impacts of oversimplified nationalized rhetoric, fake news and propaganda.
When WyoFile succeeds, more Wyoming citizens communicate their expectations to their elected officials; more hold those officials accountable when expectations are unmet; more run for office and volunteer for community boards; more attend school board meetings, Game and Fish open houses and Parks & Rec roundtable discussions; more submit comments to federal land management planning processes; more participate in economic development and policy reform collaboration. And everyone so engaged does so with full and ready access to the relevant facts, objective analysis and context they need to be effective and to make informed decisions.

WyoFile's solution has two primary elements.
The first is to produce uncompromising, in-depth, fact-based reporting about the people, places and policies of Wyoming. WyoFile will examine and challenge the decisions made and actions taken by those in power. It will explore the circumstances, connections, and incentives that influence those decisions and actions. It will continue to investigate corruption, self-interest and insider dealing. WyoFile will expand the quality and volume of information available about the key issues facing Wyoming — transparency, environment and natural resources, energy, social justice, economic diversification, political homogeneity, criminal justice and others. WyoFile will counter misinformation and lies.
The second element of WyoFile's solution is to proactively connect Wyoming's residents and others with its reporting. This is more than simply getting the content in front of eyeballs. It's building relationships. WyoFile will become a regular and relied-upon aspect of readers' daily lives, and in doing so establish the type of trust and credibility once enjoyed by the daily newspaper and monthly general interest magazines. In a landscape that's saturated with information — some of it worthwhile, some of it nefarious — relationships and credibility are more important and harder to come by than ever. WyoFile must and will focus on building community with our audience.
To accomplish this, staff will adapt WyoFile's content — not the core of it, i.e. in-depth, uncompromising journalism, but the forms in which it is presented — to better fit the way people find, consume, distribute and engage with information today. WyoFile will evolve its cadence, timing and methods of distribution to expand reach and maintain regular and more frequent contact. Staff will build multi-platform opportunities for engagement around their reporting. They will redefine “audience" to include not just the people who receive WyoFile's e-mail newsletter and/or navigate to WyoFile.com to read articles but also the broader community that read WyoFile's work in partners' magazines and newspapers, listen to its discussions on the radio, access WyoFile content via other websites, and engage with WyoFile on social media platforms.

WyoFile's aim is to change the conversation in and about Wyoming, to literally affect what people are talking about — in the office, at the bar, around the dinner table and online — when they discuss the status, policies, politics, economics, resources and future direction of Wyoming. WyoFile will relocalize Wyoming's civil discourse and reground it in the facts that daily impact Wyoming and Wyoming lives, reclaiming the conversation from the oversimplified national and international sloganeering that has come to dominate. WyoFile focuses its coverage on several key areas: government transparency, corruption, policy, politics, environment, natural resources, energy, economy, art, culture, Native America and the outdoors. WyoFile's commentary encourages substantive dialog at a time when the polarized national political discourse is reaching into Wyoming's civic life.

WyoFile upholds high professional standards by hiring experienced journalists and training promising new ones, providing fair compensation, and fostering career growth.

WyoFile is an innovator in the field of journalism, and an incubator for new approaches. It adapts its content and its delivery methods to meet the evolving expectations of digital media consumers, and to leverage the opportunities presented by new technologies and the rapidly shifting media landscape.

In May, the Society of Professional Journalists honored three WyoFile reporters with “Top of The Rockies" awards for their work in WyoFile — Andrew Graham and Dustin Bleizeffer for a series on coal-industry layoffs in Gillette, and reporter Angus Thuermer for a story about the death of Jackson alpinist Kim Schmitz.

In July, The Nieman Lab, an arm of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard, profiled WyoFile in its newsletter as an exemplar of how in-depth journalism can thrive in rural communities.

WyoFile reporting prompted the removal of a billionaire's cabin from a conservation easement in the Path of the Pronghorn.

A WyoFile expose' on disparities between lottery revenues delivered to the state, and those promised by the lottery corporation while lobbying for the game's creation prompted the Wyoming County Commissioners Association to consider drafting legislation that would limit lottery “expenses" including executive compensation.

An investigation of the opaque political dealings that killed a popular criminal justice reform bill earned a large and appreciative national audience after being picked-up by The Marshall Project. One reader in Alexandria, VA described the works as “one of the best articles I've ever read about Wyoming politics." Another, in Wyoming, as “a great example of in-depth journalism at its best," and “a great case study in the curriculum of a course in civics or political science or journalism." Reporter Andrew Graham has, in fact, since discussed the investigation with university students and faculty.

Wyofile's dogged pursuit of transparency in state government elicited a direct response from Rep. Albert Sommers at an interim committee meeting on school finance reform: “I don't want this perceived by the public that we're sneaking around behind closed doors making decisions." Much like the reintroduction of wolves has affected elk behavior, the presence of the Wyofile journalist is impacting the way public business is conducted.

Financials

WYOFILE
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

WYOFILE

Board of directors
as of 02/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr David Evans


Board co-chair

Mr Geoff O'Gara

Karen Hertel

Charlotte Belton

Eugenie Copp

Loring Woodman

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/29/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data