ASIA Families

aka ASIA Families   |   leesburg, VA   |  www.asiafamilies.org

Mission

To give a voice to adoptees and adoptive families

Ruling year info

2010

CEO/Founder

Mrs. Grace H. Song

Main address

18536 Perdido Bay Terrace

leesburg, VA 20176 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

ASIA

ASIA-InKAS US

EIN

27-0970126

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Other Art, Culture, Humanities Organizations/Services N.E.C. (A99)

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Since international adoption of South Korean children was triggered by casualties of the Korean War after 1953, it is assumed that over 100,000 children were adopted from Korea to US since the war. Adoptees often grow up not knowing their birth heritage or seeing other adoptee peers. It is believed that adopted individuals develop healthier self- identity when they have been exposed to their birth culture earlier in their lives and have made meaningful connection with other adoptees. ASIA Families was founded to respond to their post adoption needs to provide cultural education and offer a safe and welcoming community for adoptees, their families, and Korean American community members.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Korean Culture School

A monthly Culture School is for Korean adoptees, their siblings, adoptive parents, and Korean Americans where everyone will learn about Korean culture through arts and crafts, food and other hand-on activities followed by a social Korean luncheon.

The KCS is located in a Korean church in Rockville, MD. We offer separate programming for children (ages 3 -18) and their parents. The children’s education program consists of music, arts and crafts, cooking, and culture classes.  Children ages 3-18 are divided into four different age groups led by counselors.  Parents meet separately from the children to discuss adoption and Korean culture.  The culture school is offered monthly.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

ASIA Familes' Korean Culture Camp is called Camp Rice. Camp Rice is a three day long sleep over camp for the whole adoptive families. We usually host the camp at the end of July every summer. Camp Rice introduces Korean Culture in hope to assist adoptees to form healthy Korean American Adoptee identity. It is also an opportunity to relax and have fun and meet other interracial adoptive families. Children are able to bond with other adopted peers. Teens and adult adoptees form strong bonding. For adoptive parents, it is an opportunity to network with other families like themselves and support each other while raising adopted children.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

The Korea Bridge Tour is an organized group tour to support Korean adoptees and their adoptive families to visit their country of birth. The participants get to visit their Korean adotpion agencies or orphanage. The itinerary ncludes attractions and shopping in Seoul, trips to Gyeongju and Busan, a day with a host family, options for visits with foster families and/or trips to birth cities, and two additional free days in Seoul. Participants will be able to get to meet with Korean young adult volunteers and spend an evening with a local host family.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Adolescents

Related Program

Korean Culture Camp

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed cultural competence

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Korean Culture School

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

• To support the life-long journey of Korean adoptees and their families through a community that provides education and resources about Korean culture and the adoptive experience.
• To foster the development of confidence, resilience, and a strong, positive identity among adoptees throughout their unique journey.
• To grow an adoptive community which can raise awareness about and guide others in understanding the “Korean Adoption Experience.”

Programs currently offered by ASIA Families include Korean Culture School, Camp Rice, Korea Bridge Tours, Dinner for Twelve for Adult Adoptees, and student scholarships. As we continue to build upon our connections, ASIA Families looks to expand programming to better serve adult adoptees and expand our geographic reach.

When the leadership team reflected on what prevents ASIA Families from fulfilling these needs, we determined that the organization lacked the formal infrastructure required to support growth. Our current model for programing and the daily work of the organization relies primarily on volunteers. While volunteers will always be an essential element to ASIA Families, appropriate support of both volunteers and our executive director is critical to ensure consistency, provide for efficient use volunteer skill, and prevent volunteer fatigue and turnover.
The leadership team also recognizes the pivotal role of our executive director, Grace Song, in growing and sustaining ASIA Families over the last ten years. Without Grace’s dedication and passion, it would be incredibly difficult to sustain ASIA Families; both institutional knowledge and infrastructure are needed to maintain operations at the current level or quality.
In an effort to determine what changes are needed to maintain ASIA Families, the leadership team took inventory of our current programs and organizational activities. We included both current activities as well as potential activities suggested by our members. We reviewed each organizational and program activity to identify goal of the activity, those served by the activity, resources required, and barriers to the activity’s success. We found that maintaining and growing our core programs required additional organizational support, and that identified needs for new programing for teens and adult adoptees are not being met., Accordingly, the leadership team recommended focusing in the next year on strengthening the organizational structure of ASIA Families by hiring core staff and standardizing program and operational activities. These changes will position ASIA Families in the coming years to meet its program needs and allocate financial resources strategically.

When the leadership team reflected on what prevents ASIA Families from fulfilling these needs, we determined that the organization lacked the formal infrastructure required to support growth. Our current model for programing and the daily work of the organization relies primarily on volunteers. While volunteers will always be an essential element to ASIA Families, appropriate support of both volunteers and our executive director is critical to ensure consistency, provide for efficient use volunteer skill, and prevent volunteer fatigue and turnover.
The leadership team also recognizes the pivotal role of our executive director, Grace Song, in growing and sustaining ASIA Families over the last ten years. Without Grace’s dedication and passion, it would be incredibly difficult to sustain ASIA Families; both institutional knowledge and infrastructure are needed to maintain operations at the current level or quality.
In an effort to determine what changes are needed to maintain ASIA Families, the leadership team took inventory of our current programs and organizational activities. We included both current activities as well as potential activities suggested by our members. We reviewed each organizational and program activity to identify goal of the activity, those served by the activity, resources required, and barriers to the activity’s success. We found that maintaining and growing our core programs required additional organizational support, and that identified needs for new programing for teens and adult adoptees are not being met., Accordingly, the leadership team recommended focusing in the next year on strengthening the organizational structure of ASIA Families by hiring core staff and standardizing program and operational activities. These changes will position ASIA Families in the coming years to meet its program needs and allocate financial resources strategically.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Korean adoptees and their adoptive families

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

ASIA Families
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ASIA Families

Board of directors
as of 03/04/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mary Anne Wylie

Mary Wylie

NaDa Shoemaker

Patsy Reese

Garret Redfield

Charlene Cho

Leigha Basini

Jeff Miller

Emily Schifrin

Julia Whitelock

Sarah Arbes

Dae Sung Batoff

Ashley Skyrme

Valerie Fleming

Patrick Niceforo

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/4/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data