PLATINUM2022

Disability Rights Advocacy Fund, Inc.

aka DRAF   |   Boston, MA   |  www.drafund.org

Mission

The Disability Rights Advocacy Fund supports persons with disabilities in the developing world to advance legal frameworks to realize their rights.
 
The Disability Rights Advocacy Fund, a 501(c)(4) organization, is a separate legal entity from our sister fund, the Disability Rights Fund, a 501(c)(3) organization. The Disability Rights Advocacy Fund supports lobbying grants and other charitable activities.

Ruling year info

2011

Executive Director

Ms. Catalina Devandas

Main address

89 South Street, Suite 203B

Boston, MA 02111 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

27-5026463

NTEE code info

Disabled Persons' Rights (R23)

International Human Rights (Q70)

Disabled Persons' Rights (R23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Disability Rights Advocacy Fund (DRAF) launched in 2008 to support persons with disabilities around the world to build diverse movements, ensure inclusive development agendas, and achieve equal rights and opportunity for all, specifically through rights advocacy. As a participatory grantmaker with persons with disabilities at all levels of decision-making, DRAF is focused on shifting the paradigm about disability from charity to rights. Through grantmaking, advocacy, and technical assistance, DRAF supports organizations of persons with disabilities (OPDs) in Africa, Asia, the Pacific, and the Caribbean to use global rights and development frameworks to address inequality and achieve rights and inclusion. DRAF is the only global funder (together with sister fund the Disability Rights Fund) focused exclusively on disability rights.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Grantmaking

DRAF primarily supports organizations of persons with disabilities (OPDs) through our pooled fund grantmaking, which combines resources from multiple governmental and private donors to provide modest funding to OPDs. We use a participatory grantmaking approach; funding decisions are made by DRAF’s Grantmaking Committee—a mix of representatives from donors and global leaders with disabilities. Together with the Board, the Grantmaking Committee also reviews and updates grantmaking guidelines annually. Pooled fund grants are made through three funding streams: Small Grants, Mid-Level Coalition Grants, and National Coalition Grants. Small Grants ($5,000 - $20,000 for new grantees, and up to $30,000 for repeat grantees) help to broaden and diversify the disability movement through support to grassroots, emergent, and marginalized groups of persons with disabilities. The additional funds now available to repeat grantees reflect a new opportunity for core funding that we created in response to the pandemic. Mid-level ($30,000 - 40,000 per year; $60,000 - $80,000 over two years) and National Coalition ($30,000 - 50,000 per year; $60,000 - 100,000 over two years) grants support coalitions of at least three OPDs undertaking advocacy at sub-national or national levels to advance legislative action, policy reform, government programs (including development programs), and budgetary frameworks that better protect and promote the rights of persons with disabilities. National Coalition grants also support coalitions of at least three OPDs leading monitoring of rights achievement and inclusive development through reporting to UN human rights and development mechanisms.

Grantmaking through non-pooled funds includes the Uganda Capacity Fund ($5,000 - $20,000), Strategic Partnerships (up to $300,000), Special Opportunity Grants ($2,500 - $35,000), Grantee Convening Grants ($5,000 - $30,000), and Technical Assistance Grants ($14,000 - $30,000). These grants are recommended by Program Officers and approved by the Non-Pooled Fund Grants Board Committee. The Uganda Capacity Fund supported through Wellspring funding has been particularly valuable to DRF’s grantmaking strategy development. We saw how valuable this extra resourcing for organizational capacity building could be to especially emergent, grassroots, and marginalized OPDs, which helped to inform our OPD Strengthening funding stream ($500 - $15,000), launched at the start of 2020. We used experience from the UCF model to build this funding stream to support especially pooled fund grantees to address high risk areas of organizational capacity, including safeguarding and financial management.

In the past year across all grantmaking streams, DRAF and DRF (our sister fund) made a combined 193 grants to 124 unique OPDs and partner organizations totaling $3,058,555. The largest grant was $132,000 for the Disability Justice Project (Strategic Partnership Grant), and the smallest was $500 to several recipient OPDs (OPD Strengthening Grants).

Population(s) Served

DRAF’s Technical Assistance Strategy aims to increase grantee technical knowledge on, and skills for, advocacy on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) and SDGs, to increase grantee knowledge and skills to monitor human rights and inclusive development processes, and to build grantee capacity to form alliances within and across movements. Our focus is on three objectives:
- Resource and/or facilitate tailored technical assistance to grantees in priority focus areas in line with DRF/DRAF country strategies, overall Strategic Plan, and results framework;
- Support and/or resource national umbrella organizations to coordinate and facilitate technical assistance with members of the movement they lead; and
- Integrate technical assistance planning, implementation and monitoring into DRF/DRAF’s systems.

Population(s) Served

National and local level advocacy is supported through grantmaking, technical assistance, and program oversight by DRF and DRAF personnel who are, in the main, disability activists in their countries. Advocacy at this level is led by and prioritizes rights advocacy goals of OPDs in target countries. National and local level advocacy priorities are articulated through Country Strategy Objectives tailored to each country and developed in consultation with the movement. Beyond supporting grantees to drive the change they want to see in their countries, advocacy at this level is also contributing to more inclusive and diverse movements, and influence at regional and global levels through, for example, engagement in Voluntary National Reviews, and UN human rights treaty alternative reporting.

Regional level advocacy, to date, has been supported on an ad hoc basis through grantmaking and technical assistance. In future, we seek to prioritize participation by persons with disabilities, particularly marginalized voices, in key regional fora to influence more inclusive and rights based regional mechanisms, such as the SAMOA Pathway, Africa Commission and ASEAN. We will also support engagement in regional human rights and inclusive development mechanisms, such as the Regional Forums for Sustainable Development.

Global level advocacy is undertaken by DRF and DRAF personnel, together with movement leaders, including those most marginalized, to influence decisions, policies, practices and resourcing of global actors and to raise awareness and visibility of the activism of persons with disabilities from the Global South towards increasing their participation. Our regional and global advocacy draws on, supports, and informs the advocacy of our grantees and program staff at national and local levels, and vice versa.

Our strength is in our experience as a participatory grantmaker inclusive of persons with disabilities at all levels, and as a long-term funder of disability rights movements in the developing world, with reach to the most marginalized persons with disabilities. We will leverage these strengths in our advocacy at regional and global levels to focus on four priorities going forward:
1. Voices of and knowledge about those most marginalized in the disability movement being front and center of dialogue, decision making, and resourcing
2. Increasing dialogue and understanding about the intersectionality of rights
3. Mobilizing disability-inclusive funding and resources across target actors
4. Ongoing monitoring and learning, together with grantees, to adjust our advocacy in response to changing contexts

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Women and girls
LGBTQ people
Indigenous peoples
People with disabilities
Women and girls
LGBTQ people
Indigenous peoples
People with disabilities
Women and girls
LGBTQ people
Indigenous peoples

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of changes to national level legislation, policies and government programmes (including those addressing national and global crises) underway with DRAF/DRF grantee input in target countries.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is cumulative (total number to date, not in calendar year) and tracked in a combined DRAF/DRF logframe.

Number of pooled fund grants awarded to emergent OPDs not previously active in the public realm.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of total pooled fund grants made to OPDs of women with disabilities in target countries.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of target countries that have formal participation of persons with disabilities in government and/or civil society mechanisms for implementing and monitoring the SDGs.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

DRAF is contributing to the impact of persons with disabilities participating fully in society and enjoying equal rights and opportunities. The desired outcome is that the rights of persons with disabilities are improved in target countries in accordance with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The outputs we measure through our logframe (tracking both DRAF and DRF outputs and outcomes) include:
Output 1 : Legislation, policy, and government programs (including those addressing national and global crises, such as COVID-19) undergoing harmonization with the CRPD in target countries through the participation of representative OPDs
Output 2: Representative OPDs from target countries participating in international and national human rights and SDG monitoring processes (including disability rights monitoring during national and global crisis responses, such as COVID-19)
Output 3: Disability movement in target countries is inclusive, reflecting the diverse voices of persons with disabilities
Output 4: Representative OPDs equipped to advocate on the rights of persons with disabilities (during national and global crises, such as COVID-19)

DRAF works closely with donors, international development actors, governments, human rights activists, grantees, and other partners to achieve systemic change. Our theory of change, governance, grantmaking processes, and organizational structures are actively informed by persons with disabilities. Our strategies – grantmaking, advocacy, and technical assistance – describe the primary ways we build movements, drive agendas, and achieve rights.

Financials

Disability Rights Advocacy Fund, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Disability Rights Advocacy Fund, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/05/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Lorraine Wapling


Board co-chair

Mr. Andrew Ferren

Aditi Juneja

Charlie Clements

Setareki Macanawai

Andrew Ferren

Beth MacNairn

Kristen Pratt

Lorraine Wapling

Mariel Gonzales

Maria Ni Flatharta

Alberto Vasquez

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/29/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability