Big Brothers Big Sisters of Butler County, Inc.

Defenders of Potential

Hamilton, OH   |  www.bbbsbutler.org

Mission

The mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Butler County is to create and support one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth. Since 1968, we have been working tirelessly to realize our vision of a world in which all youth achieve their full potential by providing our evidence-based mentoring programs to children throughout Butler County, Ohio.

Ruling year info

1974

Chief Executive Officer

Carolyn Winslow

Main address

1755 S. Erie Blvd., Suite D

Hamilton, OH 45011 USA

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Formerly known as

Big Brother and Big Sisters of Greater Hamilton

Big Brothers and Sisters of Middletown

EIN

31-0846147

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Butler County believe all children have the potential to succeed. We know, however, that many youth face obstacles to fully realizing that potential. All of the children we serve face challenges that put them at risk of engaging in negative behaviors. For example, among all the youth we served in 2020: 45% are from single parent homes, 20% live with non-parental guardians, 85% live at or below the poverty line, 16% are children of an incarcerated parent, 71% have a family history of substance abuse, 18% have a mental health diagnosis, 42% are members of a racial minority group, and over 50% have a history of child abuse in their families. These harsh circumstances make it difficult for these youth to reach their full potential. We show these children a path to success by introducing them to mentors who can serve as living, breathing examples of the success they can achieve and reliable sources of the guidance and support they need to achieve it.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

One-to-One Mentoring

Our One-to-One Mentoring Program provides caring mentors for children in need. This program is broken down into two sub-categories, Community Based Mentoring and Site Based Mentoring. The Community Based Program matches children with caring adults who meet with them two to four times per month on their own time to do activities of their choosing. The Site Based Program matches elementary school-age youth with high school students, college students, or older adults who meet with them once per week in a group setting at a designated location (usually the child's school) supervised by a BBBS staff member. The children we serve through both of these programs are some of the most underprivileged youth in Butler County. All of them face some combination of risk factors, such as having one or more incarcerated parents, facing a mental health issue, having a family history of substance abuse, living with a learning disability, or having a juvenile court record. Many of them live in poverty or reside in single parent homes.  They are all the same to us--kids who have the potential to succeed in life, if only someone will step in and defend that potential.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Ohio Prevention Provider 2020

Affiliations & memberships

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America 1968

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth service participants who have involvement in juvenile justice system

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Preteens, Economically disadvantaged people, At-risk youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We have a vision of a world in which all children realize their full potential, regardless of their circumstances or backgrounds, and we work to make that vision a reality by creating and supporting one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth. We aim to provide all Butler County children who face adversity with caring mentors who will encourage them to avoid negative behaviors like skipping school, engaging in delinquency, or abusing drugs or alcohol. Our goal is for every child in our program to graduate from high school with a plan for what comes next, whether that means going to college, learning a trade, starting a career, or enlisting in the military. By giving these children someone who can help them succeed in school and in their relationships now, we help them start on a path that will lead them to even greater success as they grow up. We aim to provide a mentor for every child who comes to us for help so that we can help all children realize their full potential.

In order to realize our vision, we provide mentoring programs for youth that fall under two primary categories: Community Based Mentoring and Site Based Mentoring. Our Community Based Mentoring Programs match children ages 6-14 with caring adult volunteer mentors. The mentor-mentee pairings (matches) get to set their own agendas for each meeting (as long as they abide by all BBBS guidelines), and they usually develop a friendship through doing fun activities, working on homework, working on goals specific to each child's needs, and just hanging out. Our Community Based matches do all sorts of activities, from hiking in the woods, to practicing yoga, to holding scavenger hunts at thrift stores. They also take plenty of time for more laid-back activities like going out to eat or hanging out at their mentors' homes—many of our Little Brothers and Sisters (Littles) say their favorite activity is spending time at their Big Brother or Sister’s (Big’s) home cooking, baking, playing games, walking the dog, watching movies, and similar activities. As they spend time together, each Big develops a strong relationship with his or her Little. It is this relationship, not just the advice a Big gives or any of the ways they help work on goals specific to the child, which truly changes the life of a child.

Our Site Based Mentoring Programs match elementary school age children with volunteer mentors who can be high school students, college students, or older adults. The Bigs meet with their Littles at a specified location (usually a school, but it can also be a church, community center, etc.) where they spend time working on homework together, doing craft activities, playing board games, or playing outside. The volunteers are matched with the same child each week, but the activities take place in a group setting. A Big Brothers Big Sisters staff member supervises each program, brings supplies, and measures and monitors the progress of each match. We currently have 14 site based programs at schools and organizations across the county.

We also offer activities for children who are still waiting to be matched with mentors through our Club of Unmatched Littles (COUL) Program. The kids in this program are invited to participate in activities every other month from September to May and every other week in the summer. These activities give the kids a glimpse of what it will be like to have a Big, and they also allow BBBS staff to get to know them so the Littles can be matched with volunteers who best fit their personalities, needs, and interests.

All of these programs are essential to fulfilling our mission and helping children develop strong relationships with caring mentors who can help them ignite their potential.

Big Brothers Big Sisters is the premier mentoring organization nationally, and our local agency has been a full affiliate of the national organization since our founding in 1968. Throughout our long history, we have acquired a vast set of knowledge about mentoring best practices, and we implement them in all of our mentoring programs. Our tried-and-true mentoring model has been proven effective time and time again because of the careful steps we take to make sure the children we serve stay safe and get as much as possible out of the mentoring relationships we create for them. We start by screening and training volunteers as soon as we recruit them in order to make sure they are a good fit for the program and to prepare them for the responsibility of mentorship. Then, we interview each child and volunteer so we can learn as much as we can about each of them in order to match each child with a mentor who fits his or her needs, personality, and interests. After the relationship has gotten started, one of our professional match support specialists regularly checks in with each child, parent or guardian, and volunteer to make sure each child is making progress on the goals set for him or her and to address any concerns in the relationship before problems arise. Big Brothers Big Sisters created this model over decades of research, and as a full affiliate of Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, we have access to this model and all the new research the national organization has conducted and will continue to conduct. Combined with our own agency’s 53 years of experience, research, and outcome tracking, our BBBSA affiliation gives us a vast breadth of knowledge of what makes mentoring work. This knowledge of and experience with mentoring makes us highly capable of achieving our vision.

In 2020, we served 305 total children through our Site Based Mentoring and Community Based Mentoring Programs and 102 children through our Club of Unmatched Littles program. Our goal is to increase the total number of children we serve through all these programs to 500 in 2021. Using the POE and COS/YOS, we have also tracked strong positive outcomes for the youth we served in 2020. Among all the children who were matched with a mentor through one of our programs in 2020:

• 100% avoided substance use and contact with Juvenile Court
• Youth demonstrated a 50% increase in protective factors
• 99% improved their self-confidence
• 86% improved their attitude toward school
• 86% improved their academic performance
• 87% demonstrated better relationships with their peers
• Littles in Site Based Mentoring Programs improved in an average of 1.7 subject areas

We aim for our programs to yield even stronger outcomes in these areas by the end of 2021.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have implemented a comprehensive array of educational opportunities for our staff that examines DEI issues and seeks to provide us all with greater understanding.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Butler County, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Butler County, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Maranda Barhorst

Apple

Term: 2021 - 2023

Maranda Barhorst

Apple

Eric Doolin

Barclays

Tim Essex

Best Version Media

Rob Enderle

Messer

Annette Tiesman

Midwest Sports

Kim Thompson

Ameriprise

Andrew Tyree

Macy's

Jonathan Fox

Frost Brown Todd

Michael Albrecht

Butler Tech

Jim Fogle

Thyseenkrupp Bilstein

Joann Mamaligas

Sorg Bay West FCU

Joe Newton

Turner Construction

Monica Thomas

Warren Co. Court of Common Pleas

Brad Vanoss

First Financial Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/5/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/05/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.