Community Harvest Food Bank of Northeast Indiana, Inc.

Seeking to alleviate hunger through the full use of donated food and other resources.

Fort Wayne, IN   |  https://www.chfb.org

Mission

Community Harvest Food Bank of Northeast Indiana, Inc. seeks to alleviate hunger through the full use of donated food and other resources.

Ruling year info

1984

Executive President

Ms. Carmen Cumberland

Chief Executive Officer

Mr. John Wolf

Main address

999 East Tillman Rd

Fort Wayne, IN 46816 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

31-1100607

NTEE code info

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Community Harvest Food Bank has operated since 1983 in response to hunger in northeast Indiana. What originally started as a grassroots community effort to help the local population during a severe economic downturn has grown into a regional effort serving food insecure populations in 9 counties. Today, Community Harvest distributes more than 17 million pounds of food annually to kids, seniors, Veterans, and families that identify as food insecure, both through in-house hunger relief programs, and through local nonprofit agency partnerships. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, hunger has exploded in northeast Indiana as a result of economic and personal distress. As a first responder, Community Harvest remains committed to serving the more than 112,000 people who are struggling with hunger in the region.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Hunger Relief Programs

Community Harvest's food bank network in Northeast Indiana provides assistance to nearly 90,000 individuals each year. We partner with nearly 400 nonprofit member agencies in Adams, Allen, DeKalb, Huntington, LaGrange, Noble, Steuben, Wells and Whitley counties. We also operate direct service programs: Kids Cafe and Summer Feeding, after-school and summer free feeding programs; Kids BackPack and TeenPak programs, weekend and holiday food for children; SeniorPak and CSFP, grocery programs for mobile or homebound seniors with limited income; Farm Wagon, a mobile fresh produce and perishables pantry serving low-income neighborhoods and rural areas; Community Cupboard, a "mom & pop" type pantry for clients referred by other non-profit agencies; Hope for Heroes, a program providing groceries to vulnerable Veterans and military families; and Crisis Assistance, emergency food bags for families in crisis.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

Where we work

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Hunger Relief Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Community Harvest Food Bank operates several in-house hunger relief programs, as well as provides food to nearly 400 nonprofit member agencies.

Number of meals delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, At-risk youth, Adults, Children and youth, People with disabilities

Related Program

Hunger Relief Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of food donation partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total pounds of food rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Hunger Relief Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Hunger Relief Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Community Harvest Food Bank aligns its goals with the mission to alleviate hunger. Goals include:

- Increase access to fresh fruits, vegetables, and healthy foods
- Improve overall health and wellbeing through healthy food access
- Immediate reduction in the level of hunger through programs and community outreach
- Provide a stable resource of food to vulnerable and at-risk populations in need
- Work with community members and partners to identify needs and gaps in service in order to create/modify programs to meet those needs

In addition to partnerships with nearly 400 regional nonprofit member agencies, Community Harvest Food Bank operates several in-house hunger relief programs including:

• Community Cupboard food pantry - a uniquely designed pantry to resemble a grocery "shop"
• Saturday Helping Hands - a weekly public distribution open to the public with no sign-up required
• Farm Wagon mobile pantry program - a program that brings food to all nine counties of the food bank's service region to distribute fresh produce, dairy, and other available food items to anyone in need
• Kids BackPack/TeenPak - these two programs provide weekend food to kids and teens without food access
• Kids Café & Summer Feeding - Community Harvest operates these two USDA programs to provide prepared meals to kids in need during the week
• SeniorPak - provides nutritious foods to seniors who are both mobile and medically homebound
• Hope for Heroes - provides nine months of grocery assistance to Veterans and military families
• Crisis Assistance - provides emergency food on a walk-in basis to individuals and families in need

In our ongoing efforts to obtain fresh, locally-grown produce for distribution, Community Harvest continues to partner with local farmers, obtaining a combination of purchased and donated fresh produce for distribution to families. Nearly 1/3 of the food bank's overall distribution is fresh produce, demonstrating its focus on providing quality, nutritious foods to vulnerable populations.

Community Harvest Food Bank has remained sustainable since its 1983 beginnings. Because of our transparent reporting and responsible use of funding, programs attract funding and support from a variety of contributors. Even during the recession following the 2008 financial crisis, and the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, Community Harvest continued to grow to meet the increased demand of food, distributing more food to the hungry year over year.

We continue to rate the highest four-star designation on Charity Navigator, a national organization that rates charities based on responsible financial decisions and transparent reporting. We are proud to say that 98% of our total income is allocated directly to programs instead of administrative or fundraising expenses. We also maintain an A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau, meeting all 20 Standards for Charity Accountability. Lastly, we maintain a GuideStar charity profile to demonstrate our commitment to transparency.

Notable Accomplishments:

Our biggest reward for 2020 has been the ability to serve everyone in need, and do the right thing by keeping people fed. We did not receive any awards or special recognition, but that is likely true for thousands of community members and organizations also out there doing their best to help in different ways. We’re lucky to do what we do, and we’ll be here to fulfill our mission even when COVID is a distant memory.

Hunger relief is our mission, but we are so very passionate about it on a personal level. Some who work at and work with the food bank also have lived experiences of hunger, an experience which shows when their compassion for others shines through. We often see people who want to “pay it forward,” whether it is because they’ve received help in the past from the food bank, or they know someone who has struggled. The experience of not having enough to eat is something that stays with a person forever, and the outcomes of these experiences can have lasting effects, both positive and negative. We take these things to heart, and we share our compassion with individuals and families coming to us for help – sometimes with a feeling of shame, sometimes for the first time, sometimes in desperation. By our efforts to give them a positive experience, we are not only treating them with dignity and respect, but will leave a lasting positive impact that will stay with them long after the struggle is over.

We will continue our progress toward our goals:

1. Immediate and measurable reduction in food insecurity
2. Improvement in overall health and quality of life among clients facing hardship
3. Improvement in the ability of clients to select healthier foods when the household is stabilized, through client education on eating choices, including cooking demonstrations by partners such as the Purdue Extension Office

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Community Harvest Food Bank operates to alleviate hunger, and serves any individual identifying as food insecure with in its nine-county service region. This includes disabled individuals, kids, seniors, Veterans, families, and any others who are in need of food assistance. Clients identify as low-income, most earning under 185% of the federal poverty income level.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Community Harvest Food Bank of Northeast Indiana, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Community Harvest Food Bank of Northeast Indiana, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 02/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Donna VanVlerah

Parkview Health

Term: 2017 - 2023

Jeff Beights

Source One Solutions, Inc.

Burt Brunner

Dulin, Ward & DeWald, Inc.

Tammy Andrews

Lincoln Financial Group

David Aguilera

Walmart

Mike Cahill

Physicians Health Plan

Melanie Crysler

Costco

Dr. Sherilyn Emberton

Huntington University

Steve Engleking

Purdue Extension

Matthew Elliott

Beckman Lawson, LLP

Chris Gomez

Kroger

Nick Hess

Walmart

Rep. Chris Judy

Indiana State Representative, District 83

Kara Kelley

Asher Agency

Huzvaak Limzerwala

Brotherhood Mutual

Adam Smith

BKD CPAs & Advisors

Jared Thompson

JAT of Fort Wayne

Donna Van Vlerah

Parkview Health

Brandon White

Fort Wayne Community Schools

Casey Scheurich

Dulin, Ward & DeWald CPA

Jason Wardwell

ENS

Stan Ziherl

5 Star Distributing

Stan Ziherl

5 Star Distributing

Stan Ziherl

5 Star Distributing

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/1/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/01/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.