Coalition for a Drug-Free Greater Cincinnati, Inc.

Guiding Communities for a Vibrant Future

aka PreventionFIRST!   |   Cincinnati, OH   |  www.prevention-first.org

Mission

PreventionFIRST! promotes healthy behaviors by sparking and sustaining community change. Our vision is that people make healthy choices in every stage of life.

Ruling year info

1996

President and CEO

Mrs. Mary F Haag

Main address

2100 Sherman Ave Suite 102

Cincinnati, OH 45212 USA

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Formerly known as

Coalition for a Drug-Free Greater Cincinnati

EIN

31-1474841

NTEE code info

Community Coalitions (S21)

Alcohol, Drug Abuse (Prevention Only) (F21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Underage drinking is still the number one drug used/misused by adolescents , marijuana use and perception of its harmfulness is eroding , and the increased use of opiates and overdose deaths among young adults across Ohio is at crisis levels . As a result of the latter, there has been burgeoning groups of activists attempting to organize communities focused on addressing the opiate problem. Of concern has been the lack of capacity in evidence-based community prevention among these community groups as well as schools. There is an urgent need to engage communities in evidence-based prevention.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Center for Community Engagement

We are building community capacity across the tri-state region. There are over 30 neighborhood-level coalitions and groups that we have helped to start or are helping to sustain. Multiple community sectors are being educated on effective prevention strategies so that our communities are prepared to engage in prevention.

Our objective is to strengthen and support local, neighborhood anti-drug efforts. While our prevention actions are implemented at a regional, population level, we work to establish new and support developing programs, partnerships, and local coalitions to address their unique community conditions.

Strategies include providing training, technical assistance, and seed funding to assist and empower community residents, partners, and key leaders to address their issues.

Population(s) Served

There are many risk factors that we can mitigate and protective factors that we can enhance to prevent substance use/misuse and the likely consequences. By working at a community and systems level we can and do see changed behavior and better health.

We help schools create a comprehensive prevention program consisting of effective policy, peer led prevention, parent/student/faculty education, early education, and community collaboration.

We develop prevention messaging that reaches all members of the community no matter how they receive information: from a full blown social marketing campaign, to a viral twitter campaign to traditional broadcast and print tactics.

Most youth obtain substances from their friends and use substances in private residences. That's why limiting access is so important - keeping alcohol and prescription drugs locked up; having easy disposal sites for prescription drugs; changing local ordinances about home parties.

PreventionFIRST! has identified three primary drug use problems by our youth: underage drinking, marijuana use and prescription drug misuse. Strategies are designed to change social acceptability, access and availability, media messaging, and policy and enforcement to create a more supportive and thriving environment for youth to grow up in.

Population(s) Served

PreventionFIRST! (PF!) is invested in prevention science. We are well recognized for our Student Drug Use Survey and our Coalition Evaluation Center. This work helps to raise the community's awareness of the problem; it helps us and our partners to target our efforts and use our resources wisely; and through our metrics and evaluation, we are demonstrating outcomes.

Our key objective is to ensure data-driven decision-making for prevention action. Measuring the impact of our work and that of our partners is essential. The biannual PF! Student Drug Use Survey collects primary youth substance abuse data. The PF! Coalition Evaluation Center tracks, monitors, and reports on coalition activity and the contribution to community-level change.

Strategies include comprehensive community assessments, to understand the problem and related social consequences, evaluation of short-term and long-term outcomes, and research on special topics.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of organizations applying for grants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Center for Community Engagement

Context Notes

Letters of Intent received

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Center for Community Engagement

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Center for Community Engagement

Number of assessment guides developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Center for Prevention Science

Context Notes

Community Assessments are updated every 2 yrs.

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Center for Community Engagement

Context Notes

Annual Coalition Academy, Annual Member Meeting, webinars

Number of grassroots organizations supported

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Center for Community Engagement

% of 7th-12th grade students who report their parents would disapprove of their use of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, prescription drugs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Center for Prevention Science

Context Notes

Student Drug Use Survey conducted every 2 yrs. See website for more details.

% of 7th-12th grade students who report that use of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, prescription drugs is harmful/very harmful to their health

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Center for Prevention Science

Context Notes

Student Drug Use Survey conducted every 2 yrs. See website for more details.

% of 7th-12th grade students who report their peers would disapprove of their use of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, prescription drugs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Center for Prevention Science

Context Notes

Student Drug Use Survey conducted every 2 yrs. See website for more details.

% of 7th-12th grade students who report use of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, prescription drugs in the past 30-days

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Center for Prevention Science

Context Notes

Student Drug Use Survey conducted every 2 yrs. See website for more details.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

PreventionFIRST! is the area's leading regional drug prevention organization, serving Southwest Ohio, Southeast Indiana and Northern Kentucky with a MSA population of two million people. This combined metro region encompasses urban, suburban and rural communities. PreventionFIRST! is a 501(c)(3) non-profit aimed at promoting wellness through the prevention of substance use/misuse across the lifespan. We are laser-focused on the prevention of substance abuse. Our overarching goal is that more communities are engaged in prevention, and that more people make healthy choices. We do not work in a silo – we bring all parts of the community together to create community change. Our work is comprised of a multi-faceted set of programs, policies, and best-practices designed to engage all parts of society. The coalition model has been proven to create more long-term, sustainable change than any single strategy or program could do alone. We believe that if we create communities that can solve drug problems and we change the conditions that make drug use more likely then we will reduce drug use. Our key objectives are: 1) to ensure data-driven decision-making for prevention action. 2) to strengthen and support local, neighborhood drug prevention efforts. 3) to establish and strengthen collaboration across community sectors to implement evidence-based prevention.

The Center for Prevention Science
The Leadershp Team (researchers and staff) is conducting deep dive analysis of the 2016 findings and preparing to field the 2018 Student Drug Use Survey. The biennial community assessments have been updated. The Coalition Evaluation Center (CEC) has grown to 12 member coalitions who participate in the web-based center.

The Center for Community Engagement
The Leadership Team (experts in coalition development and staff) continue to support local member coalitions across the region. Membership has grown to 29 this year. For more established coalitions, support is provided in identified areas based on the development level of the coalition. The 2016 Coalition Academy had it highest attendance ever.

The Center for Prevention Action
Prevention action teams are maintaining strategies and activities directed at underage drinking, marijuana use, and prescription drug misuse. Gambling and tobacco prevention, as well as Youth Empowerment strategies round out our action teams.

Projects include:
• Community Festival/Event Best Practices training – designed to train festival/event planners on responsible beverage service and best practices as it relates to alcohol at these events.
• Social Host project – designed to improve policy and enforcement of underage consumption laws.
• Screening and Brief Intervention – designed to bring this evidence based best practice to middle and high school students through school nurses.
• Advocacy efforts – promoting scientific research findings related to marijuana and designed to modify local policy to reduce access to “medical marijuana".
• Community Forums – designed to bring neighborhoods together to take action to prevent drug abuse, specifically, prescription drug misuse.
• Lockboxes, Dropboxes, Take-back Events – intended to reduce social access and availability of prescription drugs in the community.
• Comprehensive school prevention plan development and training – including policy, assessment and evaluation, student/parent/faculty education, peer-to-peer leadership, early intervention, and community collaboration.
• Youth Empowerment Strategies – Youth Leadership Institute, Youth Summit, and youth mini-grants to build prevention capacity among 9-12 grade students.
• Parent education – “Parenting for Prevention" presentations including the 4th edition of “Strong Voices, Smart Choices" a guide to help parents talk with their kids about alcohol, drugs, gambling, and mental wellness.
• Gambling Task Force/s – facilitation of county and regional groups to conduct community assessment, implement low risk gambling messaging, and coordinate gambling prevention programs.
• Tobacco collaboration – county partnership to develop a youth presence that works to advocate against tobacco use and routinely engages in tobacco counter-marketing activities.
• Public awareness campaigns – broadcast, print, out-of-home, and social media messaging on current substance abuse prevention efforts.

PF! is considered a prevention resource to the community. PF! has coached/mentored over 30 communities since 1996 and this network is a resource to each other as well. In 2004, the Coalition staff developed the Coalition Development Inventory (CDI) to annually assess, monitor, and evaluate member coalition development progress. From these findings, annual plans of work are developed to provide technical assistance, training and other resources towards our goal that every community is served by a high functioning coalition. The Coalition has developed a “Youth Empowerment Package" to build foundational levels of understanding of evidence-based prevention strategies to schools. PF! has a strong partnership with the University of Cincinnati (UC) on a number of levels. Each fall semester, PF! staff teaches the “Foundations in Prevention" course at UC. PF! is committed to workforce development. Not only do we support the professional development of our own staff, all of whom are credentialed in prevention, we also coordinate the Ohio Coaches and Mentoring Network to build workforce development across the state of Ohio, particularly in rural and Appalachian communities. PF! President/CEO has served on the Ohio Chemical Dependency Professionals board. A key accomplishment during that time was the addition of the Prevention Specialist Assistant, designed to build prevention capacity across Ohio. Two of PF!'s staff are trainers for the Substance Abuse Prevention Skills Training.

• Since our founding 22 years ago, the number of drug prevention coalitions in the region has grown, from 4 to 29.
• Since the Drug Free Communities Act was first signed into law by the US Congress in 1997, over $18 Million from this federal funding stream has flowed into the region to 23 community anti-drug coalitions.
• Millions of dollars worth of pro-bono media support has been contributed from radio and television stations since the Coalition's founding.
• Alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana continue to be the most prevalent drugs of choice among 7-12 grade students from the region.
• Between 2000 and 2016, past 30-day use of alcohol has declined 46%; cigarette use decreased 61%; marijuana declined 22% and prescription drug use decreased 29%. Other drug use remains low at 1-2% depending on the substance.
• In 2016, the survey reveals that the age of onset, when youth report that they start to use substances, continues to hover around 13. The age of initiation for alcohol use rose from 12.7 years in 2006 to 13.4; for tobacco, from 12.4 to 13.1; and for marijuana, from 13.4 to 13.8. Delaying early exposure is an important indicator as the longer an individual delays using a substance, the less likely he or she is to become harmfully involved with it later on.

Financials

Coalition for a Drug-Free Greater Cincinnati, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Coalition for a Drug-Free Greater Cincinnati, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 12/13/2018
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Nathan Wander

Ernst and Young

Term: 2015 - 2018


Board co-chair

Mr. Dave Wallace

U.S. Court of Appeals

Term: 2016 - 2019

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes