PLATINUM2022

Islandwood

Discovery becomes Action

Bainbridge Island, WA   |  www.islandwood.org

Mission

Through experiential education, we take urgent issues and make them relevant to young people, shedding light on the power we all have to change the world for good. This approach prepares the next generation of inspired environmental problem solvers to work together to make an exponential impact on the planet—now and in the future. Our school programs reach more than 12,000 students every year at our 250-acre campus on Bainbridge Island, in Seattle neighborhoods, and at the King County Brightwater Wastewater Treatment Plant in Woodinville. In addition, we partner with teachers and schools across our region to provide curriculum, teacher professional development and support, and advocacy that helps connect classroom learning to real environmental issues in students' communities.

Ruling year info

1999

President and CEO

Ms. Megan Karch

Main address

4450 Blakely Ave NE

Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

31-1654076

NTEE code info

Environmental Education and Outdoor Survival Programs (C60)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

CHANGE THE WORLD FOR GOOD Through experiential education, we take urgent issues and make them relevant to young people, shedding light on the power we all have to change to the world for good. This approach prepares the next generation of inspired environmental problem solvers to work together to make an exponential impact on the planet—now and in the future. Our school programs reach more than 12,000 students in a typical year at our 250-acre campus on Bainbridge Island, in Seattle neighborhoods, and at the King County Brightwater Wastewater Treatment Plant in Woodinville. In addition, we partner with teachers and schools across our region to provide curriculum, teacher professional development and support, and advocacy that helps connect classroom learning to real environmental issues in students’ communities. Through our graduate program we are also preparing future leaders in education to ignite change in our schools, communities, and planet.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

School Overnight Program

This four-day program on Bainbridge Island extends learning
beyond the classroom, engaging 4th—6th graders in critical
thinking, scientific investigations, and actions that build awareness
of and concern for the wellbeing of people and the planet.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Designed in partnership with Seattle Public Schools, Community Waters engages 4th graders in science and engineering to understand and develop a solution to a real-world stormwater runoff problem in their community. In the process, students deepen their knowledge of science, come to view science as relevant to their lives and future, and engage in science in socially relevant and transformative ways.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Offered in partnership with the University of Washington, our graduate program is a 10-month immersive residency in justice-oriented environmental education; experiential, student-centered learning; and culturally responsive teaching and curriculum development.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Students

Our day programs connect classroom learning to real-world environmental challenges in students’ own communities. We offer water-themed day-long programs at King County’s Brightwater Wastewater Treatment Plant in Woodinville, as well as field studies of neighborhood creeks, streams, and stormwater infrastructure in Seattle.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Our professional development programs offer teachers strategies for
connecting classroom science to students’ lives and communities.
Through workshops and on-site support, teachers find new ways to
make science more meaningful and engaging for all students and build
their students’ capacity to solve real-world environmental issues.

Population(s) Served
Academics

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Scholarship dollars awarded to School Overnight Program participants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

School Overnight Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percent of schools that received a scholarship to the School Overnight Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

School Overnight Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of students who attended the School Overnight Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

School Overnight Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percent of schools that participate in our Urban Schools Program free of charge

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Community Waters Science Unit

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students who attended one or more of our Urban Schools Programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Community Waters Science Unit

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage of teachers who said they are more likely to use the schoolyard as a learning space.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of teachers trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Through our Teacher Development Program we are reaching more teachers than ever before. Our teachers have brought environmental learning to more than 4,000 kids annually.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our direct experiential environmental learning programs on Bainbridge Island, in Seattle, and in Woodinville, WA reach more than 12,000 3rd-8th graders annually. We reach thousands more kids and community members nationwide through the work of our alumni from our two graduate programs in education, as well as through our curriculum development, teacher training programs, and policy work.

All of these programs seek to advance innovative educational approaches that build understanding of our environment and empower every student to take action for greater environmental health and wellbeing. We do this through a four-pronged approach:
1. Integrating community-based, experiential environmental learning into formal education;
2. Fostering equitable access to culturally-relevant learning experiences outside the classroom;
3. Increasing diversity in the education, science, and environmental fields; and
4. Cultivating sustainable cities through education.

Integrate community-based, environmental learning into formal education: We offer day-long science programs and field studies in the greater Seattle area, intentionally designed to support teachers in connecting classroom learning to real-world examples. We've expanded our partnership with Seattle Public Schools to co-develop a 4th grade science unit and teacher training program called Community Waters. This stormwater engineering unit empowers students to define and design a solution to a local stormwater problem in their schoolyard or school neighborhood.

In addition, IslandWood is working to engage policymakers and partners on a state and national level to better support schools and teachers in taking learning outside the classroom and connecting science to real-world environmental problems in students' communities.

Foster equitable access to culturally-relevant learning experiences outside the classroom:
Our School Overnight Program – a multi-day residential environmental learning experience – was created to improve access to outdoor learning programs and is committed to culturally responsive instruction. At least 50% of the students come from low-income households and we offer differentiated programming that meets the needs of each school. The program is taught by our graduate students, using best practices in anti-bias education. We intentionally facilitate integration between schools giving students the opportunity to work together to identify and solve small systems issues, and practice critical social skills such as active listening and respectful dialogue.

We also regularly host Community Engagement Forums to listen to, learn from, consult, and develop strategies with parents, teachers, and community members to better engage each unique, diverse community.

IslandWood led a state-level coalition of organizations that advocated for the No Child Left Inside bill, which has resulted in $2.5 million in state funding for outdoor recreation and learning for underserved youth. During the 2018 legislative session, IslandWood advocated alongside other environmental education organizations for state funding to increase access to community-connected environmental learning resulting in $4 million for teacher training and support.

Increase diversity in the education, science, and environmental fields: The students in our Graduate Program in Education for Environment and Community increase diversity in our field. As our alumni become educational leaders in classrooms and in communities, they inspire youth to pursue careers in these areas.

Cultivate sustainable cities through education: IslandWood is advancing thinking around how environmental education is done in urban areas. Our programs for school aged children are focused on connecting students to the ecology and systems that shape their communities, and on empowering them to solve problems.

IslandWood is a learning organization that values continual program evolution, evaluation, and improvement. Most of our educators hold PhDs and Master's in education or related fields, and are committed to culturally responsive and inclusive curriculum and instruction. Through our Education for Environment and Community Graduate Program, we are continually learning from our graduate students, incorporating research, and developing best practices in environmental education.

Partnerships also play an important role in our work. IslandWood has strong local, national, and state level partnerships, including long-standing educational partnerships with King County and Seattle Public Schools reaching thousands of students annually.

In the two decades since we welcomed the first school bus of children to our Bainbridge Island campus, IslandWood has grown into a bold leader in innovative and inclusive education that fosters greater environmental health, a sustainable future, and social and ecological wellbeing for all. In recent years, IslandWood has been pushing the boundaries of environmental education.

Our flagship School Overnight Program provides outdoor environmental education to more than 4,000 4th – 6th grade students in a typical year, primarily from the Puget Sound region. Approximately half of the students we serve come from underserved schools, defined by high rates of students who qualify for free/reduced school meals. Our graduate certificate program in culturally-responsive teaching and experiential education – The Education for Environment and Community Program – was created at the same time as our School Overnight Program in partnership with the University of Washington now boasts nearly 350 alumni.

In 2010, IslandWood established our Urban School Programs, which today serves more than 7,000 3rd - 8th grade students each year in Seattle schools, parks and neighborhoods, and at the Brightwater Wastewater Treatment Center.

In recent years, IslandWood has extended its impact by co-developing science curriculum for Seattle Public Schools, providing teacher training in Next Gen Science Standards, launching and implementing a national and state policy engagement program.

We look forward to continuing to deepen and expand the ways in which we support public schools and teachers in providing community-connected environmental learning that empowers students to take action for greater environmental health and community wellbeing for all.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Students, Teachers, the Public

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We constantly change our programs in response to feedback. Most recently, we provided teachers with a variety of lesson plans and programs for their classroom. They provided feedback that their speciality or program has additional or unique needs. In response, we custom tailor and change programs to meet the needs of these teachers.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We have always ensured that feedback has empowered the groups we work with, so that they can grow and achieve in the way that is most effective for themselves.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, Feedback requires heavy staff time, programs are prioritized,

Financials

Islandwood
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Islandwood

Board of directors
as of 08/02/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jason Baumgarten

Partner, Spencer Stuart

Term: 2020 -

Jason Baumgarten

Technology, Communications & Media, Spencer Stuart

Marc Berejka

Director of Community and Government Affairs, REI

Laury Bryant

Community Volunteer

Laura Clise

CEO, Intentionalist

Larry Estrada

Vice President, Private Wealth Management, Goldman Sachs

Ellie Fields

Senior Director of Product Marketing, Tableau Software

Camille Gibson

Retired Marketing Executive, General Mills

David Goldberg

President, Mithun

Gretchen Hund Andrews

Director, Center for Global Security, Pacific NW National Laboratory

Fred Kleisner

Independent Director

Marguerite Kondracke

Social Entrepreneur; Retired CEO, America’s Promise

Nate Miles

Vice President for Strategic Initiatives, Eli Lilly and Company

Sara Moorehead

Vice President of Corporate Affairs, Boeing Employees Credit Union. Chief Alchemist, Alchemy Communications

Yoko Okano

Senior Manager, Content & Product, Actively Learn

Sara Otepka

Entrepreneur

Ben Packard

Executive Director, Earthlab at the University of Washington

Will Rava

Partner, Perkins Coie

Steve Sundquist

Chair, Washington State Charter School

Pooja Tandon

Pediatrician, Seattle Children’s Hospital and Research Institute. Assistant Professor, University of Washington

Lois Hartman

Community Volunteer

Leslie Gordon

Retired IBM Global Executive

Nathaniel Pieper

SVP, Fleet and Finance & Alliances and Treasurer, Alaska Airlines

Ben Nimmergut

VP Engineering Functions, Washington State Design Centers

Bisi Akinola

Director and Asocciate General Counsel for Meta Business Group

Chasity Malatesta

Eductaor, Facilitator & Equity Advocate

Dan Meyer

Retired Dentist, Scientist & Educator

David Wu

President & CEO, Special Olympics Washington

Kelvin Washington

Executive Director, MUST

Stacey Sturgess

SVP and Private Client Manager at Bank of America

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/1/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data