GOLD2022

CINCINNATI WORKS INC

A Job is Just the Beginning

aka Cincinnati Works   |   Cincinnati, OH   |  www.cincinnatiworks.org

Mission

We will partner with all willing and capable people living in poverty to assist them in advancing to economic self-sufficiency through employment. Through job-readiness training, job-placement assistance, and 1-on-1 career coaching and financial coaching, we empower our Members (clients) to improve their personal stability and financial wellness. We complement our coaching with a variety of support services, as well as relationships with local employers and non-profit partners. We understand that a job is just the beginning, and our Members’ challenges do not end when the first paycheck arrives.

Ruling year info

1999

President & CEO

Tianay Amat

Main address

708 Walnut St.

Cincinnati, OH 45202 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

31-1656186

NTEE code info

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Personal Social Services (P50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The dual challenges of labor shortages and poverty pose a problem for employers and society at-large, which provides an opportunity to make subtle but substantive changes that benefit employers and society at-large. An opportunity to grow the local economy while creating a more vibrant and inclusive community. In 25+ years of fighting poverty through employment, Cincinnati Works has found a model that addresses both problems: 1-on-1 support for the working poor. Since we opened our doors in 1996, we have offered lifetime coaching for all of our clients, whom we call Members. In recent years, we have brought that coaching to workplaces throughout Greater Cincinnati to great effect. We have invested in financial coaching to help our Members make the most of every dollar they bring in. And we have utilized technology to reach our Members virtually – an evolution made necessary by the pandemic but with potential to benefit the community for years to come.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Job Readiness

Job Readiness is the core program at Cincinnati Works. It helps our Members take a step back, identify their strengths and skills, then move forward with specific goals and a strategy in mind.

For most Members, Job Readiness begins with a two-day JumpStart workshop, where they learn employer expectations, define their professional strengths, then practice presenting those strengths during mock interviews.

All Members are paired with an employment coach who serves as a guide during the job search, helping Members find leads and prepare for interviews. We also have a bank of computers available for Members to use at no cost when searching or applying for jobs, along with a staff member who will assist them with online applications.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

For Members who have demonstrated a level of professional stability - most commonly by achieving one year of steady employment with the same employer - our Advancement program offers another step toward self-sufficiency. Our coaches assist Members in pursuing additional skills training, attending college or developing specific interpersonal skills, which helps them advance in their careers and increase their pay.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our Members often come to us carrying years of personal and professional baggage that makes it difficult to reach economic self-sufficiency. Some populations require additional services from uniquely qualified coaches.
Our Phoenix Program works with individuals in (or at risk of falling into) a life of crime and violence, and it offers them an alternative, including mentoring and leadership opportunities.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Incarcerated people

Financial literacy is often the missing link to establishing economic self-sufficiency. We have full-time financial coaches who provide a range of FREE financial services to our Members, including:
• Budgeting
• Saving & Checking Accounts
• Understanding & Building Credit
• Debt Resolution
• Tax Preparation
• Accessing Loans

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Nonprofit-of-the-Year 2010

Cincinnati USA Regional Business Chamber

Social Entrepreneurship Award 2009

The Manhattan Institute

Impact 100 Award 2007

Next Step Program

ONE Award – Principles Category 2007

Cincinnati Business Courier

Torch Award 2006

Better Business Bureau

Affiliations & memberships

Chamber of Commerce 2000

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2000

Society for Human Resource Management 2000

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of job skills training courses/workshops conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Job Readiness

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Job Readiness

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes job readiness, job placement, retention, advancement, financial coaching

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

By addressing the multiple concerns and needs of Members and Employer Partners, Cincinnati Works is able to eliminate barriers to attaining long-term employment and, ultimately, economic self-sufficiency. This approach respects the dignity of the Members while building them up to become genuinely responsible for themselves, equipped with the necessary internal strengths and external support systems.

The short-term goal for the unemployed is to help them stabilize in a job that pays $12.00 - $15.00 (or more) per hour with health benefits.

The long-term goal for the underemployed is for them to earn 200% of the federal poverty guidelines and move to economic self-sufficiency.

Through research, study, and experience, we have developed a model that includes job readiness, placement, retention, and advancement, not simply job placement. We provide ongoing 1-on-1 coaching tailored to the specific needs and goals of each Member, complemented by support services such as legal coordination, transportation assistance, behavioral health counseling and chaplain services. We understand that a job is just the beginning, and our Members’ challenges do not end when the first paycheck arrives.

In recent years, we launched Workforce Connection, a suite of services for local employers to build and develop their frontline workforce, taking advantage of the expertise we have built over 25+ years. In addition to placing Members with local employers, we contract with employers to hire for frontline positions and we have placed Cincinnati Works coaches on-site at employers such as Gorilla Glue, Graeter’s, JTM and Kutol Products.

Our office is in downtown Cincinnati, but our presence is much wider. We have invested in technology and partnerships that allow our Members and coaches to connect virtually when they can’t connect in-person. For those who are able to make it downtown, we have a renovated Member Suite with the space, technology and staff support to help our Members shine.

Using a holistic approach, the organization offers its Members lifetime access to Employer Partners while providing them with comprehensive support services including one-one-one employment coaching, legal advocacy, transportation assistance, and guidance in financial literacy. Partnerships with other organizations in the community to enhance these services and further help Cincinnati Works Members overcome barriers to employment such as an inability to secure affordable, quality childcare; legal issues; lack of transportation; debt and other credit issues.

Analysis by the University of Cincinnati Economics Center shows that Cincinnati Works has delivered more than $150 million in economic benefits since our founding in 1996, between income generated by our Members and a reduced use of public services. Some Members have benefited directly from services our coaches and staff provide; others benefited more from the connections we facilitated. Our mission with each act is to make it easier for them to get a job, get to the job, and be their best on the job. We help stabilize families and allow talent to flourish, so businesses can grow and communities can thrive.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our mission is to end poverty through stable employment, so we work with all willing and capable individuals at 200% AMI. Many of our clients (whom we call Members) come to us for help finding and securing a full-time job. We also work with individuals who have full-time, frontline positions and seek assistance with barriers that make it difficult to keep the job or advance to a better job.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently renovated the first floor of our office to be a more-welcoming space for our clients (Members), including equipping our classroom with more usable technology. After receiving feedback that the white walls in our classroom felt "too institutional" to our Members, we added graphics to one wall and painted another.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

CINCINNATI WORKS INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CINCINNATI WORKS INC

Board of directors
as of 11/10/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. David Herche

Enerfab


Board co-chair

Ms. Lee Stautberg

Dinsmore

David Herche

Enerfab

Robert Loftus

No Affiliation

Liane Phillips

Cincinnati Works

Norma Skoog

No Affiliation

Dana Glasgo

Cincinnati Career Coach

Gerron McKnight

E.W. Scripps

James Strayhorn

Bright Star Baptist Church

Teresa Haught

The Jewish Foundation of Cincinnati

Richard Kuertz

Retired, JPMorgan Chase

Brian Carley

Slubessential Holdings

Eric Lanter

Chase

Thomas Gilman

Gilman Partners

Tianay Amat

Cincinnati Works

Jim Benedict

Government Strategies Group

Dan Best

Total Quality Logistics

Tom Hardy

Retired, Unity Financial

Danyele Harris-Thompson

Kao Corporation

Thuy Kolik

Lighthouse Youth & Family Services

Ian Owens

Bahl & Gaynor Investment Counsel

Chris Powell

Talmetrix

Greg Purdon

Grote Enterprises

Eric Smith

Bank of America

Carol Walker

Kroger

Ebony Young

Children's Hospital

Lee Stautberg

Dinsmore

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.