Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Desert

Together, We are Defenders of Potential!

PALM DESERT, CA   |  www.bbbsdesert.org

Mission

To build and support one-to-one relationships to ignite the biggest possible futures for youth. Our vision is for all youth to reach their full potential.

Ruling year info

1996

Executive Director

Mrs. Judy Tobin May

Main address

42600 COOK ST Suite 110

PALM DESERT, CA 92211 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

33-0683335

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

Alcohol, Drug Abuse (Prevention Only) (F21)

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring program is challenged to right the wrongs that have been around for centuries. We are charged with solving systemic problems for children facing adversity in our culture – access to education, poverty, housing, food instability, and ethnic barriers. We feel this is accomplished through mentoring and our Empowering Potential Program which empowers us to be defenders of children’s potential to succeed by providing them with a mentor, a support system and programs like Empowering Potential to guide them as they face all of these challenges.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community-based Mentoring

A volunteer Big Brother or Big Sister is matched one-to-one with a child to be their mentor and friend. They spend an average of 4 to 8 hours per month for a minimum of a year doing things in the community together like going to the movies, the park, swimming, hiking and playing ball with a goal of developing a positive relationship. The volunteer Bigs are carefully screened and trained in order to ensure child safety and relationship quality. The youth and their families are also assessed to determine the needs of the child and preferences of the parent, so that we are able to make a match where Big and Little have similar qualities and set a foundation for a good relationship. Each match is unique and develops a schedule that works for them. Each mentoring relationship is supported by a trained program staff member who monitors each match through regular communication, evaluation and coaching.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adolescents

Like our community program, a volunteer Big Brother or Big Sister is matched one-to-one with a child. They spend 4 to 8 hours at a designated site for a minimum of a year. The Site-Based Mentoring Program matches qualified high school student leaders (volunteers) and/or adults with elementary school youth who attend one of five after-school programs run by Boys & Girls Clubs. Our mentors help with homework, school projects, building self-esteem, sports, activities to help them achieve the goals set out for each child enrolled. Using High School students to be Big mentors provides a positive activity for teens to do after-school along with providing training and skills they can use in college or the workforce.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Our Empowering Potential Program is a life-skills and college readiness program for the kids in our program. The EPP staff work directly with our high school aged Littles to provide help, guidance and coaching so they can develop a plan after high school graduation. College readiness, financial aid assistance, vocational training programs and military service are discussed for each Little in our program who is in high school. Our goal is for on-time high school graduation and each Little to have developed a future plan to include education and training so they can earn a living wage and have the skill set needed to be an adult.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children and youth

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America 1997

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percentage of Littles graduating from High School on-time

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescent boys, Young boys, Adolescent girls, Young girls, At-risk youth

Related Program

Community-based Mentoring

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Percentage not whole numbers.

Average Match Length (in months)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, At-risk youth, Low-income people, Multiracial people

Related Program

Community-based Mentoring

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

So far in 2019 average match length is 48 months.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Directly impacting a child’s life is a long-term endeavor. To break the cycle of children living in adverse situations, we believe mentoring is a proven and powerful tool to help youth reach their full potential. We define mentoring as the presence of a caring person offering support, advice, friendship, reinforcement and constructive examples. Quality mentoring relationships offer significant potential to reduce the adverse effects of absentee fathers/mothers by improving young people’s attitudes toward parents, encouraging youth to focus on their education, and helping kids face daily challenges. Our mentoring is accomplished by using three core programs: Community-based mentoring, Site-Based mentoring and our Empowering Potential Program - which addresses the problem of inequity in preparation and support for college and career success. Our aim is to have every child in our program prepared to be put on the path for college, career and life success.

Our strategies are two-fold:
1) Recruitment of Children for Program Services
2) Recruitment of Volunteers to be the Service Providers

This is achieved by strategically partnering with schools, after-school youth programs, mental health providers, businesses and faith-based organizations to help identify children who can benefit from a mentor. Continual outreach to volunteer rich organizations, businesses, service clubs and social clubs to identify mentors. Increased public relations efforts though public speaking engagements, social media posts, radio and television interviews , public service announcements and impact stories featured in the local print materials (newspaper and magazines).

The volunteer Bigs are carefully screened and trained in order to ensure child safety and relationship quality. The youth and their families are also assessed to determine the needs of the child and preferences of the parent, so that we are able to make a match. Each match will be paired based on common interests and backgrounds, complementary personalities, and the potential to form a long bond from the very start of their relationship. Highly-trained and committed Match Support Specialists will work with each child, volunteer and parent, regularly checking in to ensure the relationship is happy and strong.

Supporting all aspects of growth and youth development allows for a well-rounded mentoring experience, providing youth with the proper resources to succeed in life.

We have 4 full-time program staff members who have all gone through the required BBBSA training and Child Safety Certification programs and average 6 years working for BBBSD. All Program Staff have earned college degrees and are bilingual to better serve our community since over 60% of the children served are Hispanic. We have one part-time staff member also with a college degree, who oversees the Empowering Potential Program, who works with our Littles who are in high school to achieve long-term educational and career success. Overseeing the entire staff is our founding Executive Director who has been with BBBSD for 22 years.

Our program staff work as a team to achieve the greatest results and fulfillment of our mission yet they each play a specific role in that team. They are all cross-trained in each role within the organization as well. Continual education and training is provided to program staff to keep up with the latest youth development trends.

Since the development of our Empowering Potential Program over 10 years ago, 100% of our matched Littles graduated from high school with over 90% going onto higher education (university or community college), vocational training programs or military service.
Our average match length has increased by 7% which indicates longer and stronger match relationships.

We are developing more career mentoring aspects to our Empowering Potential Program through our speaker series with guest speakers, trainers scheduled to cover financial responsibilities of a young adult "Credit Do's and Don'ts", Panel of business professionals who talk about their path to their career and College Admissions Personnel and a panel of retired military serviceman to talk about their experience and their path in the military branch they were in.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Children, parents/guardians and volunteers are the people the fulfill our mission. We serve children throughout the Coachella Valley and do not discriminate on ethnic, religious, sexual orientation.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Post COVID pandemic, feedback we have received was to help children in our program who were struggling with socialization. We started holding more small group activities for our Bigs and Littles on a regular basis to help the children learn how to socialize with their peers. Our Bigs (volunteers) saw a huge impact on their Littles (child) verbal skills and self-confidence around others.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Part of our program procedure is to gather regular communication with our stake holders - the children, volunteers and parent/guardians. Through the Case Management reports, we are able to gather feedback, look at trends and needs and adapt our program services to help support what the children need to develop a healthy, safe and meaning relationship with their Big (volunteer mentor).

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Desert

Board of directors
as of 05/19/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Robert (Bob) Igelhart

RBC Wealth Management

Term: 2019 - 2021

Jennifer Walton

Sacred Heart School

James Thoman

Shea Homes - Trilogy Polo Club

David Humphrey

Cosgrove Cosgrove & Humphrey, Attorneys at Law

Melissa Davidian

Abbott Neuromodulation

Tricia Eppelheimer

Regency Sales Broker

Beverly Fitzgerald

CA Association of Realtors

Jim Greene

Retired

Amy Jeandron

Edward Jones Advisors

Corinna Nolan

Law Offices of Soda & Greenberg

Peter Nolan

Slovak, Baron Empey Murphy & Pinky Attorneys

Ernesto Rosales

Consultant Mortuary

Jerremy Sage

JNS Next Media

Mike Solomon

Anthem Air Conditioning & Heating

Billy Thoman

Trilogy La Quinta Realty

Christoffer Thomsen

Schlecht Shevlin & Shoenberger ALC

Diana Braun

Experian

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/19/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/19/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.