YWCA of Cleveland Ohio

Eliminating Racism, Empowering Women

aka YWCA Greater Cleveland   |   Cleveland, OH   |  www.ywcaofcleveland.org

Mission

YWCA Greater Cleveland is dedicated to eliminating racism, empowering women and promoting peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all.

Ruling year info

1942

President and Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Margaret Mitchell

Main address

4019 Prospect Ave

Cleveland, OH 44103 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

34-0714800

NTEE code info

YMCA, YWCA, YWHA, YMHA (P27)

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

YMCA, YWCA, YWHA, YMHA (P27)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Homelessness and other trauma often result in persistent barriers to success in education, work, and relationships for the children and adults who have experienced these adversities. Children who have suffered childhood trauma need specialized support to mitigate the impact of that trauma on their behavioral, physical and emotional health and development. As documented in the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study, traumatic childhood experiences are linked to difficulties with thinking clearly, reasoning, problem-solving, impulse control, planning ahead, and anticipating consequences and acting accordingly. As a result, these children may behave in ways that appear unpredictable, oppositional, and volatile. Adults with histories of trauma in childhood have been shown to have increased health problems, high-risk behaviors, mental health concerns, chronic illness such as heart disease and cancer, and early death.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Early Learning Center

YWCA’s trauma-informed two-generational Early Learning Center (ELC) preschool meets the needs of families with young children that have experienced homelessness or other significant trauma. ELC prepares 3-to-5-year-olds social-emotionally and academically for success in kindergarten. The two-generational model focuses equally and intentionally on a high level of services for the parents and families through case management and supportive services. Family services and engagement activities support the family in increasing self-sufficiency and provide pathways for parents to become more involved with their children’s development.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Economically disadvantaged people

The Nurturing Independence and Aspiration (NIA – pronounced knee-ah) program is a Trauma-Informed System of Care model focused on permanence, education, employment, housing, physical and mental health, and personal and community engagement for youth 18 to 24 years of age transitioning from failing systems – including foster care. NIA case management and supportive services make successful outcomes possible for Independence Place.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
People with psychosocial disabilities

YWCA Greater Cleveland advocates for the civil and human rights of women, children and people of color; educating and communicating public policies that impact underserved communities and populations.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Women’s Leadership Initiative empowers women to become effective leaders by providing them with the essential skills necessary at each stage of their career. A variety of carefully tailored programs are designed to support women in all phases of their careers – and to ensure that organizations are prepared to do the same. The YWCA Women’s Leadership Initiative propels professional women further and faster up their career ladder.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

YWCA’s Norma Herr Women’s Center (NHWC) provides immediate, low-barrier shelter to women experiencing homelessness in Cuyahoga County. Our trauma-informed shelter and engagement focuses on meeting women where they are and helping them develop a personal, sustainable housing plan that meets their own goals and fits their individual needs.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adults

Independence Place is a 23-unit, permanent supportive housing program for homeless young adults aged 18 to 24, the majority of whom have been involved in child welfare or aged out of foster care. YWCA Greater Cleveland created Independence Place to address the critical need for housing and supportive services of youth transitioning out of failing systems, including foster care. We provide residents with a safe and nurturing place they are proud to call home as they begin the path to becoming independent, self-sufficient adults.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults

A Place 4 Me (AP4M) is a county-wide public/private community collaborative established to lead and coordinate efforts to end youth homeless by improving outcomes for youth. In addition to convening stakeholders, AP4M manages certain direct youth-support projects that span the needs of youth from across the AP4M partner organizations.
AP4M’s activities bring the community together in a planning process that aligns contributions from the different sectors that impact youth homelessness; to advocate with leadership in our community for resources to address gaps in services for homeless youth; to supplement direct care for young adults who are navigating housing instability and homelessness; and finally to bring young people who have lived experience of homelessness to the tables of system change.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults

Located in Detroit Shoreway neighborhood, the historic Cogswell Hall has been around for over 140 years providing support for women. Cogswell Hall supports adults who have experienced homelessness by offering quality, trauma-informed care, building community, and uplifting the voices of disabled and economically disadvantaged members of our community. We provide permanent housing for 41 residents, each living independently in an individual apartment. Our staff support residents in setting and pursuing their goals and connect them with services available in the community. Many residents also work with outside caseworkers, doctors, and visiting nurses.



Most residents have experienced homelessness, as defined by the federal government or come from another housing situation that is unstable or unsustainable. Every apartment has a bed, desk, chair, small refrigerator, microwave oven, and a private bathroom. All residents have access to common spaces throughout the building, including a parlor and library, activity rooms, floor lounges, computer stations, and CogsMart, our small, in-house store. Three meals a day are served in our family-style dining room.

Residents also partner with staff and volunteers to plan community-building activities including arts and crafts, discussion groups, game and movie nights, exercise opportunities, and outings for shopping, recreation, and education.

Population(s) Served
People with physical disabilities
People with psychosocial disabilities
People with other disabilities
Extremely poor people
Homeless people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of conference attendees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Advocacy, Inclusion and Public Policy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of families who report that service and support staff/providers are available and capable of meeting family needs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Early Learning Center

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Early Learning Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Rate of student attendance during the reporting period

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Early Learning Center

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of student suspensions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Early Learning Center

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of women sheltered.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Norma Herr Women’s Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Percent of tenants maintaining housing after exit.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Independence Place

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

YWCA Greater Cleveland is dedicated to eliminating racism, empowering women and promoting peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all.

YWCA Greater Cleveland improves lives and our community through direct service, advocacy and education. Our direct services are targeted at disenfranchised populations that include:
--Young families with children ages three to five who are facing homelessness or other significant trauma
--Homeless and at-risk youth, particularly those who are aging out of the child welfare and foster care systems
--Women who are homeless
--and people who are affected by racism and sexism.

Living in a homeless shelter is nothing short of extremely stressful—overcrowding, curfews, operational restrictions, and parenting without privacy create chaos and disempower parents in relation to their children. With the average length of shelter stay being over six months, homeless families experience these stressful conditions long enough to be significantly, negatively impacted.

Norma Herr Women’s Center:

--Improving shelter conditions that support transition to permanent housing
--Ensuring low barriers to shelter services
--Providing extensive on-site services including intensified case management, health care including mental health services, and guest involvement and engagement activities that are responsive to the particular needs and situations of these women

Early Learning Center:
--Children are prepared to be successful in kindergarten
--Child and family increase resiliency, which includes feeling empowered and equipped to implement healthy parenting and to identify pathways to building financial security and securing housing
--Family achieves self-sufficiency

Independence Place/NIA:

The overarching goals of IP NIA and Community NIA are to ensure that homeless young adults gain secure housing and engage in the supportive services they need to transition from the crisis of homelessness to self-sufficiency, and that they are supported in maintaining independence within the community.

AP4M:

AP4M’s overarching goal is to improve outcomes for youth who face homelessness, disconnection from work and school, and premature parenthood. We have a special focus on youth aged 14 to 24 years who have been involved in foster care, and on addressing racial disparity in the homeless population.

YWCA Greater Cleveland creates and implements solutions that improve lives and our community. Our direct social services programming supports the needs individuals and families while our systems-level work provides programming for the community that mobilize people to address the root causes of gender and race discrimination.

CHILDREN: We achieve and measure progress in focus, empathy, impulse control in the children in our Early Learning Center. We work with children to catch them up developmentally with their peers. Eighty-five percent of students in 2018 met or exceeded school readiness milestones for their ages. These social-developmental milestones are key items that children with traumatic experience tend to be behind in, while they have been shown to be critical (much more so than academic milestones) to children succeeding in kindergarten, school and life in general. With proper skill development and emotional competencies, children can catch up academically; without them there tends to be a spiral downward. We believe that these factors, if unaddressed, are among the most costly effects of victimization of children, as they rob them of education, health, opportunity, relationships and the capacity to recover.

YOUNG ADULTS: Through our services, young adults develop housing skills, decision-making skills, and financial capacity, ultimately leading to securing housing and stability. They also find community and social-service support to address their past trauma, keep themselves safe, and find their role as adults in our community. These capacities, as described in question one, are those that are often undeveloped in adolescents in foster care and are critical to adult functioning. The brains of young adults (Jim Casey, 2011) are still especially plastic and still open to learning these skills, but this window closes quickly in a person’s twenties, so it is imperative that action be taken by young adulthood.

WOMEN: Women in homelessness need support in overcoming barriers to self-sufficiency in the areas of housing, employment, education, budgeting, document retrieval, physical and mental health services, nutrition, and transportation. Our case managers/life coaches work directly with participants on these issues and we have documented success not only in our participants securing housing, but in maintaining housing. We track action toward and improvements in employment, education, budgeting, document retrieval, physical and mental health services, and food security in the process. We also provide transportation as much as possible.

PARENTS: We improve and measure parental resilience, social connections, knowledge of parenting and child development, concrete support in times of need, and the social and emotional competence of children. These are the critical indicators of a parent’s (and family’s) ability to thrive. We also work with parents to learn to support their child in developing healthy responses to the impact of trauma.

YWCA Greater Cleveland differentiates itself as a truly trauma-informed organization focusing on relationships with historically victimized groups and continuously sharpening our response to the impact of homelessness, racism and sexism on individuals and on social systems.

OUR TRAUMA-INFORMED SERVICES BUILD LASTING RESILIENCY:

YWCA Greater Cleveland takes a truly trauma-informed approach to reaching and supporting people. Many of our participants come to us without having disclosed their personal history of victimization, so all our staff members are trained in trauma-informed care so we are ready to respond without warning to such disclosers and support the participant. Our services are structured to recognize trauma-based needs and behaviors and work gently with participant (with or without disclosure) so as not to re-traumatized them and to maximize their likelihood to disclose, engage and heal.

We understand that trauma is complicated and that, before disclosing, survivors often need time to develop trust with providers. We are not a one-size-fits-all organization. Rather, our trauma-informed approach allows participants choose what issues they want on the table, define their own goals, and work with staff to map out their own path to stability. We work with participants through success and failure to develop their resiliency, sense of safety, self-determination and feeling of dignity. Our experience has shown us that for highly traumatized participants, the set-backs are part of progress. One participant who had survived many traumas, including sex-trafficking, withdrew from school several times—we took that as an opportunity to help her see how her trauma responses were affecting her perceptions and decision making, and worked successfully to prepared her to recognize and respond more productively in the next time.

Organizationally, we work to ensure that our front-line providers and our leadership reflect the people we serve. Our staff member face many of the same challenges of our target population: close to 50% come to the YWCA with the experience of poverty, hunger and determination and nearly 15% have previous personal homelessness experience. The daily trauma of walking with participants in their experience of poverty, homelessness, violence, racism doesn't stop when employees leave work: over the past 12 months 11 staff member have experienced the murder or suicide of close family member. Over 70% of our staff and two-thirds of our leadership team are from minority racial/ethnic groups.

NORMA HERR WOMEN’S CENTER: Our trauma-informed shelter and services focus on meeting women where they are and helping them develop a personal, sustainable housing plan that meets their own goals and fits their individual needs. Access is not contingent on sobriety, income, criminal record or other conditions. Since assuming operation of the shelter in May 2018 we have helped over 300 women secure housing.

EARLY LEARNING CENTER: Our Early Learning Center transformed its focus to families in homelessness with goals of preparing trauma-surviving preschoolers for educational success and building family stability. It is the only trauma-informed preschool in Northeast Ohio focusing on families of children with adverse childhood experiences. In 2018, 89% of students were homeless at enrollment. In 2017 and 2018, all PreK students reached kindergarten readiness and successfully transitioned to kindergarten. Less than 6% of our families have returned to homelessness.

INDEPENDENCE PLACE (IP)/NURTURING INDEPENDENCE AND ASPIRATIONS (NIA): Together, IP and NIA were the first Permanent Supportive Housing facility directed at youth experiencing homelessness, combining supportive services with housing to allow for the successful transition to community living. NIA employs an opt-in approached to case management in which all support activities are optional, meaning we place the burden on the case managers to engage the tenant. We actively engage tenants on the issues they are ready to address, leading to a much higher participant commitment and success rate. 100% of current tenants have opted into case management.

A PLACE 4 ME (AP4M), formed in 2014, is a YWCA-led collective impact initiative of over 30 organizations that improves outcomes for youth in the homelessness services system, the majority of whom were victims of childhood abuse. It fills gaps in youth homelessness services directly through Youth Navigators, financial education and emergency and transition assistance. Through AP4M we place youth on advisory boards, planning committees and taskforces to ensure their voice is at the table. It has influenced public policy including Cleveland's Say Yes to Education plan and Cuyahoga County's procedures for youth exiting foster care.

Financials

YWCA of Cleveland Ohio
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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YWCA of Cleveland Ohio

Board of directors
as of 10/8/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Pat Gardner

Parker Hannifin

Term: 2019 - 2021

Renee' Chelm

Community Member

Ann Frangos

Community Member

Patricia Gardner

Parker Hannifin

Jo Goren

Community Member

Nicole Gray

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company

Jan Gusich

Ahkia Public Relations

Suzanne Hanselman

BakerHostetler

Erin Luke

Thompson Hine LLP

Janet Miller

University Hospitals

Michael Roecker

Lubrizol Corporation

Christine Santoni

Reminger Co. LPA

John Wirtshafter

McDonald Hopkins Co. LPA

Maurenn Wood

EY

Amy Garnitz

The A.L. Wain Company

Jill Bautista

Eaton

Tammy Coney

Vive Le Macaron!

Julie DiBaggio Lum

Weltman, Weinberg & Reis Co, LPA

Terry Drushel

Oswald Companies

Megan Featherston

VNTG Home

Lorraine Gaulding

PolyOne

Amy Kellogg

BakerHostetler

Jennifer Kocan

PNC Bank

Eric Luke

Thompson Hine LLP

Judith Matsko

Community Member

Ellen Moreau

The Sherwin-Williams Company

Barbara Myers

Highland Consulting Associates, Inc.

Yadira Ramos-Colon

Deloitte

Barb Smith

KeyBank

Shari West

Community Member

Deandra Williams-Lewis, Esq.

ReliabilityFirst Corporation

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data