THE ARC OF GREATER CLEVELAND

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Mission

The Mission of The Arc of Greater Cleveland is to empower persons affected by intellectual and developmental disabilities through advocacy, education and the promotion of activities that improve quality of life.

Ruling year info

1964

Executive Director

Ms. Melissa Khorana

Main address

12660 Plaza Dr

Parma, OH 44130 USA

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Formerly known as

Center for Mental Retardation

EIN

34-0924983

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (P01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Arc of Greater Cleveland provides advocacy, education, and training to individuals with developmental disabilities, their families, service providers, and health professionals. As part of its mission, The Arc of Greater Cleveland has gained expertise in implementing an evidence-based training program that promotes healthier lifestyles through its Healthy Lifestyles for People with Disabilities program. Seeking to expand and sustain the community impact of this program to “scale-up" the Healthy Lifestyles for People with Disabilities program in the Greater Cleveland area. We have developed a plan for the Train-the-Trainer (T-3) Initiative. The goals of this initiative are to recruit, train, and support a cadre of Healthy LifestylseTrainers from community-based residential and service agencies that serve individuals with disabilities, thereby building the on-going capacity for these organizations to promote healthy living among the clients whom they serve.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Partners In Policymaking

Summary of Partners in Policymaking® The Arc of Greater Cleveland is sponsoring the Partners in Policymaking® educational program produced by the Minnesota Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities created in 1987. Partners in Policymaking® is a leadership-training program designed for adults with disabilities and for parents of young children with disabilities. The program teaches leadership skills, and the process of developing positive partnerships with elected officials and other individuals who make the policy decisions about services. The project is:
Value based;   Competency based;   Teaches leadership skills, best practices, and how to influence public policy at all levels of government;   Includes at least 128 hours of training;   Covers specific topic areas;   Utilizes the expertise and experience of presenters with a national perspective and knowledge of best practices in the topic areas; Involves readings, homework, and a public policy project.  . It is based on the belief that the most effective and enduring public policy decisions are made by the people who need and use services in partnership with elected officials and other policymakers. It is about becoming confident in oneself, competent in the knowledge and information received, and comfortable in sharing the life experiences and expertise one brings to the program.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adults

This program is modeled on the evidence-based research curriculum from the Institute on Developmental Disability at Oregon Health and Sciences University, which was developed with the input from individuals with disabilities. Because people with developmental disabilities face unique challenges in attaining and maintaining a healthy lifestyle, the Healthy Lifestyles for People with Disabilities program provides hands-on instruction, with simplified, short activities that people with developmental disabilities and their direct service providers can understand and continue to practice at home. The curriculum includes several main principles:
1) An integrated approach that defines health as multidimensional and promotes balance among the dimensions.
2) Self-determination, and the fundamental principle that people with disabilities must have the opportunity to practice choice, control, responsibility, and accountability for their lifestyle choices and actions.
3) Application of Bandura’s social-cognitive theory, emphasizing knowledge and skills acquisition to increase self-efficacy for engaging certain behaviors.

Structurally, the program includes 10-weekly sessions lasting three hours each, which cover topics of wellbeing, including spiritual, physical, emotional, and social health. During the session, participant dyads engage in nutritious meal preparation with an instructor, and learn the skills necessary to prepare healthy meals at home.
The Healthy Lifestyles program focus population is on people with developmental disabilities, whom are defined as individuals who were diagnosed with a disabling condition prior to the age of 22. This population includes individuals with autism, blindness, hard-of-hearing, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, traumatic brain injury, learning disabilities, and any other condition that has impacted a person’s learning and development. This program must take place in a completely accessible environment, using accommodations and modifications as necessary. The Arc Greater Cleveland has a long history of offering services in a patient-centered, inclusive fashion, attentive to transportation needs, accessible locations and the importance of cultural and learning differences. Materials are also available in Spanish.

Families and caregivers (i.e. direct service providers, family members) are included as participants in this dyad, because in order to be successful, this program needs to address the home and work environment, which includes the individuals in that person’s life who are directly involved with/responsible for cooking, shopping, and activity planning for the person with developmental disabilities. This program will provide these caregivers an opportunity to learn about their own needs, learn about the needs of the person they support, and allow them to spend quality time with the person they care for as well.

The Train-the-Trainer (T-3) scale-up of the Healthy Lifestyles program is focused on community partners of The Arc of Greater Cleveland. The Arc of Greater Cleveland will draw on its existing community relationships to invite trainer groups to the T-3 program. These trainers will then, in turn, return to their home community organizations (e.g. community centers, YMCA, etc.) to hold a Healthy Lifestyles program based on the training received, and with the support of The Arc’s program consultants.

Population(s) Served
People with intellectual disabilities
Caregivers

This program was designed by the national Arc. Each year we are able to join with United airlines to provide individuals with autism and other intellectual disabilities the chance to experience what it is like to travel. Individuals along with a family member will check in to receive their boarding passes, proceed through security, head to the gate and finally board the aircraft. Everything is simulated to be identical to real air travel. Familiarity is the key to success with this population. Family members come away with a good idea of what it would be like to travel.

Population(s) Served
Families
People with intellectual disabilities

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

The ARC of the United States 1962

American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) 1962

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2006

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2008

United Way Member Agency 1962

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of health education trainings conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, People with intellectual disabilities, People with physical disabilities

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of staff members certified in subject area training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of community events or trainings held and attendance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, People with intellectual disabilities, People with physical disabilities

Related Program

Healthy Lifestyles

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Healthy Lifestyles

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Participants' average level of knowledge increased in ALL healthy lifestyle topic areas. 80% of participants rated the the overall quality of the workshop as "Excellent" (53.3%) or "Good" (26.7%).

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Because the needs of people with developmental disabilities are often complex and unique, effective partnerships between the healthcare system and community support and service agencies are required to achieve optimum health outcomes. The daily work of The Arc of Greater Cleveland is addressing social determinants of health in the population. The Arc of Greater Cleveland sees the devastating impact of chronic diseases, including diabetes, on their clients and has a long-term commitment to working with healthcare providers to reduce the burden of chronic disease by promoting healthy lifestyles. By scaling up the Healthy Lifestyles program through the Healthy Lifestyles Train-the-Trainer (T-3) Initiative, The Arc of Greater Cleveland anticipates we will achieve measurable positive health outcomes in people with disabilities in our locale. Goal 1: Create a Self-Sustaining Infrastructure for Disseminating Healthy Lifestyles program through a community-based Train-the Trainer (T3) Initiative
Objective 1: Train and mentor 20 dyads of Healthy Lifestyle Trainers who represent major disabilities service and support organizations in the community
Goal 2: Address diabetes prevention in the disabilities community
Objective 2: Incorporate prediabetes risk assessment into the Healthy Lifestyles program
Goal 3: Engage the healthcare community in diabetes prevention in individuals with development disabilities
Objective 3: Outreach to participant's current healthcare provider and train primary care faculty physicians in the Healthy Lifestyles model, adapting elements of model to primary care practice

In addition, the Healthy Lifestyles program also has the ability to influence the health and wellbeing of family caregivers and direct service providers who may accompany participants to the session. Direct service providers are a vulnerable population themselves, and are often immigrants and low-wage workers with limited access to the health system, and at risk for chronic conditions that affect underserved populations. This program has the added tangential benefit of reaching the family caregiver and direct service provider population, and improving their health in parallel with their clients.

By scaling up the Healthy Lifestyles program through the Healthy Lifestyles Train-the-Trainer (T-3) Initiative, The Arc of Greater Cleveland anticipates we will achieve measurable positive health outcomes in people with disabilities in our locale. Currently, the Cuyahoga County Board of Developmental Disabilities serves 6,556 people aged 14 and older. By holding two training sessions, and training 10 dyads each session with each dyad educating 16 participants at their home community organization, The Arc of Greater Cleveland can reach 320 people in a year, about 5% of all developmentally disabled people in Cuyahoga County in a two-year period.

The Arc of Greater Cleveland has been an independent advocate fighting for the basic needs, safety, and rights of children and adults with developmental disabilities by helping families secure support services, financial assistance, housing, education and training, employment, healthcare and by educating and training health and service providers to provide high-quality, patient-centered services. The Arc of Greater Cleveland is the independent voice in the area fighting for equal rights and equal access to services for children and adults with developmental disabilities.

How does The Arc of Greater Cleveland help?
• Provides information and resources to individuals and families to help them navigate the confusing public and private service systems
• Investigates and helps resolve issues that individuals or families might have with service providers
• Provides instruction and training to health professionals and service providers to improve their healthcare and service quality
• Participates as a member of the steering committee in a regional research network devoted to improving the health care of persons with developmental disabilities, the Developmental Disabilities- Practice-Based Research Network (DD-PBRN)
• Teaches individuals with developmental disabilities how to protect their basic rights and receive equal access to services
• Serves as a watchdog for any agency or organization that provides services for individuals with developmental disabilities

The Arc of Greater Cleveland accomplishes its mission through:
- Systems advocacy – The Arc of Greater Cleveland works toward achieving a vision of shared values about people with disabilities. Through the Partners in Policymaking® program, The Arc of Greater Cleveland offers educational training for adults with disabilities and for parents of young children with disabilities. The program teaches leadership skills and the process of developing positive partnerships with elected officials and others who make policy decisions. The Arc of Greater Cleveland advocates also serve on committees to promote individual rights and ensure that the least restrictive practices are used in all settings.
- Adult and school-age advocacy – The Arc of Greater Cleveland helps individuals and families by providing information about services and resources available, as well as making referrals. The Arc of Greater Cleveland advises People First of Cuyahoga County, an advocacy group that empowers individuals to protect their own rights. School-age advocates work closely with parents to help them understand and utilize the systems that are in place to ensure that every child reaches his/her maximum potential.
- Public awareness/education – The Arc of Greater Cleveland offers workshops and conferences that educate families, professionals, community organizations and the general public about important issues facing individuals and families affected by developmental disabilities.

Healthy Lifestyles for People with Disabilities program provides hands-on instruction, with simplified, short activities that people with developmental disabilities and their direct service providers can understand and continue to practice at home. The curriculum includes several main principles:
1) An integrated approach that defines health as multidimensional and promotes balance among the dimensions.
2) Self-determination, and the fundamental principle that people with disabilities must have the opportunity to practice choice, control, responsibility, and accountability for their lifestyle choices and actions.
3) Application of Bandura's social-cognitive theory, emphasizing knowledge and skills acquisition to increase self-efficacy for engaging certain behaviors.

Structurally, the program includes 10-weekly sessions lasting three hours each, which cover topics of wellbeing, including spiritual, physical, emotional, and social health. During the session, participant dyads engage in nutritious meal preparation with an instructor, and learn the skills necessary to prepare healthy meals at home.
Following the 10 week curriculum, participants engage in support group meetings once a month for a 6 month period, to reinforce what was learned in the sessions, and to continue to expand their ability to work towards a healthy lifestyle. After the first pilot year, positive impact on the health of participants was shown based on data collected from pre- and post-workshop evaluations, which rated participant self-identified level of knowledge on certain healthy lifestyle topics, if they learned new things, and the overall quality of the workshop. Specifically, in each of the healthy topic areas, participants felt their knowledge increased. Participants' average level of knowledge increased in all healthy lifestyle topic areas (on a scale of 0-5, with 0 = None and 5= A Lot):
• exercise and physical fitness - increased from 3.26 to 3.93 (+.67)
• nutrition and healthy diet - increased from 2.97 to 3.87 (+.9)
• emotional health - increased from 3.30 to 4.03 (+.73)
• healthy social life - increased from 3.47 to 4.14 (+.67)
• relationship between all of the above - increased from 2.93 to 3.9 (+.97)

Participants also indicated they learned something new in each of the healthy lifestyle areas, particularly in the area of nutrition and healthy diet (80%), exercise and physical fitness (67.7%) and the relationship between social health, emotional health, nutrition and diet, and exercise and physical fitness (71.4%.).

Financials

THE ARC OF GREATER CLEVELAND
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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THE ARC OF GREATER CLEVELAND

Board of directors
as of 02/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

James DeFeo

PolyOne Corp.

Term: 2020 - 2022

Dick Russ

James DeFeo

PolyOne Corp

Dr. Carl Tyler, Jr.

Cleveland Clinic

Daniel Waldeck

Huntington

Janice Paul-Canfield

Walthall Rea CPAs

Amy Hook

Betsy O'Connell

Medical Mutual

Dr. Irene Dietz

MetroHealth Medical Center

Charles Gagliano

Marcus & Millichap

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes