Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank

Feed People. Fight Hunger.

Mission

To lead a collaborative network that empowers people to experience healthy and hunger-free lives. We distribute food to feed people and we advocate, engage and convene our community in the fight to end hunger.

Ruling year info

1982

President & CEO

Mr. Daniel R. Flowers

Main address

350 Opportunity Parkway

Akron, OH 44307 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

34-1369388

NTEE code info

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Hunger is a complex problem that can be solved. In this country of great abundance, there is more than enough food to feed everyone facing hunger. According to data from Feeding America, nearly 50% of the food grown, processed and transported in America is wasted, while 41 million individuals—including 13 million children—are hungry every day. The Foodbank rescues food from going to waste through its partnerships with local retailers and through its prepared and perishable food rescue program, Community Harvest. Each year, 1 in 7 individuals face hunger within the Foodbank’s service area. Despite improving economic factors, there continues to be a large number of people in our region who face hunger and seek help through hunger-relief programs.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Distribution

The Foodbank provides food and other essential items to its network of hunger-relief partners in eight Northeast Ohio counties: Carroll, Holmes, Medina, Portage, Stark, Summit, Tuscarawas and Wayne. These network partners operate nearly 500 food pantries, hot meal sites, shelters and other hunger-relief programs in the neighborhoods and communities where people need food.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To close the meal gap by 76 percent in partnership with our network, by providing access to 31.2 million meals to families facing hunger in the Foodbank’s service region

The Foodbank acquires food from a variety of local and national sources including retailers, manufacturers and farmers. Foodbank staff members skillfully procure food, coordinate drivers to pick up donations, manage warehouse storage and operations, while recruiting volunteers and training network partner programs to ensure the safe processing and distribution of food.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The Foodbank serves individuals and families facing food insecurity in our eight-county service area.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently constructed a new facility in Stark County. We worked to gather feedback from local community organizations, neighborhood residents, and food program visitors to better understand their needs. We heard from the community that, in addition to food, they would like to have access to other resources to support themselves and their families. Based on this feedback, we formalized partnerships with 5 other community organizations to utilize our new facility and bring other services to people while they are receiving food. We are in the initial stages of these partnerships, but look forward to evaluating the effectiveness of these interventions through both quantitative data and qualitative feedback from the people experience the program.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We believe it is important to have an asset-based mindset, meaning that the people we serve have knowledge and expertise to offer our organization and our community partners. When we started our feedback and engagement journey, we quickly realized that the way we measured partner success was lacking an understanding of the experiential elements of charitable food. Through the collection of feedback, we hope that we’ve built trust with the people we serve and empowered them to share their stories and perspectives. Their perspectives and ideas have influenced partnerships we’ve formed, programs we’ve developed, and the way we communicate about our work.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Akron-Canton Regional Foodbank

Board of directors
as of 10/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Terry Link

Roetzel & Andress

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/17/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data