Human Services

Families First Indiana, Inc.

  • Indianapolis, IN
  • www.familiesfirstindiana.org

Mission Statement

The mission of Families First is to create healthier communities by strengthening families and individuals during life's challenges and changes.

Main Programs

  1. Breaking Free
  2. Family Counseling
  3. Parent Education
  4. Chemical Dependency
  5. Older and Challenged Adults
  6. Homebased Family Preservation
  7. Employee Assistance Program
  8. Father Engagement
  9. Alternatives to Domestic Violence
  10. Crisis Hotline
  11. Child's Haven
Service Areas

Self-reported

Indiana

We serve Marion, Hamilton, Boone, Hendricks, Hancock and Morgan counties in Central Indiana.

ruling year

1952

President & CEO

Self-reported

Mr. David Siler

Keywords

Self-reported

family counseling, addiction services, domestic violence services, Vistas Eldercare services

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Also Known As

Families First

EIN

35-0877572

 Number

1378239881

Physical Address

615 N. Alabama St. Suite 320

Indianapolis, 46204

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Family Services (P40)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Alcohol, Drug and Substance Abuse, Dependency Prevention and Treatment (F20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Families First was founded in 1835 by Indianapolis community leaders who believed that the success of our city was integrally tied to the success of the families who were settling and living here. Based on the enduring principle that strong families are the foundation of a healthy community, Families First continues to provide comprehensive counseling and support to strengthen families through an array of services addressing the challenges of parenting, family conflict, emotional trauma, substance abuse, domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, brain disorders affecting mental health, and the needs of older and challenged adults.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Breaking Free

Professional help is provided for victims and children experiencing domestic violence. Counseling includes individual sessions and group treatment and support to live free of the threat of being the victim of violence.

Category

Mental Health, Substance Abuse

Population(s) Served

Crime/Abuse Victims

Offenders/Ex-offenders

Budget

1,198,891

Program 2

Family Counseling

Professional help is provided for people experiencing a wide variety of challenges including marital conflicts, parent-child relationships, divorce adjustment or individual stress. Services offered range from brief support and reassurance, to crisis intervention and long term in-depth counseling.

Category

Mental Health, Substance Abuse

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

469,257

Program 3

Parent Education

Training to prepare parents for the challenges associated with parenthood. Classes focus on infants and toddlers, preschool, school-aged children and teens. In addition, presentations to community groups cover family, parenting and relationship issues customized to the needs and interests of diverse audiences .

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Adults

Budget

246,626

Program 4

Chemical Dependency

Outpatient professional help is provided for families where at least one member is alcohol or drug dependent. Counseling includes individual family sessions and group treatment.

Category

Mental Health, Substance Abuse

Population(s) Served

Substance Abusers (Drug/Alcohol Abusers)

General Public/Unspecified

Budget

1,143,704

Program 5

Older and Challenged Adults

Program provides protective services and comprehensive social work services for vulnerable adults in Marion County who are at risk of losing their independence, or are unable to make decisions in their own best interest because of age-related cognitive impairments, developmental disabilities, or chronic mental illness. These services are designed to help elderly and challenged adults achieve and maintain optimal independence in the community, protect them from exploitation, prevent homelessness or institutionalization, and enhance their quality of life.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Mentally/Emotionally Disabled

Budget

571,591

Program 6

Homebased Family Preservation

Keeping families together and strengthening family bonds is the goal of home-based therapy, case management, and homemaker/parent aid services. We also provide family functioning assessments, supervised visitation, and comprehensive home-based services. Conflict management, emergency/crisis services, facilitation of transportation, developing structure, time/money management, healthcare, child safety and more are procured as needed.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Adults

Budget

1,456,274

Program 7

Employee Assistance Program

A confidential counseling and referral service provided free of charge to employees and their dependents. Clients receive help with alcohol and drug problems, relationship issues, family functioning, stress and anxiety, work-related problems, depression, and other personal concerns.

Category

Mental Health, Substance Abuse

Population(s) Served

Adults

Budget

125,388

Program 8

Father Engagement

Fathers referred to Families First from the Indiana Department of Child Services complete a 12-session class and receive help with:
- understanding their case
- education on their rights and the process of the child welfare system
- increasing their meaningful contact with their children
- connection to community resources to help the entire family
- an advocate for their court appearance an on their child's behalf

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Male Adults

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

383,041

Program 9

Alternatives to Domestic Violence

A 26-week batterer's intervention class and a class for women who use force help stop perpetrators from committing violence and take accountability for their actions. Classes help families develop the skills, knowledge and attitudes necessary to live nonviolent lifestyles so as not to teach violence as a way of life to the next generation.

Category

Public Safety, Disaster Services

Population(s) Served

Offenders/Ex-offenders

Crime/Abuse Victims

Budget

591,006

Program 10

Crisis Hotline

24-hour phone and text line for people who are experiencing an emotional crisis or considering harming themselves or others.

Category

Mental Health, Substance Abuse

Population(s) Served

Adults

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

296,066

Program 11

Child's Haven

Childcare for parents in individual or group therapy or classes.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Infants/Babies (under age 5)

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Budget

98,586

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Families are the building blocks of our community. They are the root which binds and grows our potential for success, our value system, and our voice. We all benefit from a supportive environment - children, parents, seniors, adults and adolescents - but unfortunately, we don't all have a supportive environment. Families First is a resource and an advocate for those struggling to maintain a healthy, positive atmosphere. Families First is the family that can provide support and guidance when it may be absent - encouraging families and individuals to find strength and health in themselves, their families, and the community.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Working from a strengths-based perspective, Families First helps address both the short and long-term behavioral health needs of the individuals and families we serve. Families First takes an active role to engage individuals and families to be dynamic participants in their success. Participatory leadership and engagement creates success for individual, and familial, development and change for the present and future.

    The approach to services is family-centered and holistic. Staff take a comprehensive view of all the family's needs in determining services. Service delivery is integrated and coordinated to minimize the negative effect of families who may be dealing with multiple single-service providers.

    Service delivery builds on identified strengths of the individual or family to achieve desired outcomes. The individual or family is involved at each stage of the service delivery process - intake, assessment, service plan, service provision, and evaluation of progress.

    Staff provide the most immediate, appropriate, and least restrictive level of care that resources allow.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Staff members are trained in providing trauma-informed and culturally competent services, to ensure that all individuals and families feel respected, understood, and free from judgement.

  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Families First staff employ evidenced-based therapeutic models.

    Benchmarks are set and metrics are tracked that include:

    - 75% of clients in family counseling will achieve or make measurable progress toward their treatment goals.
    - 85% of clients in treatment for chemical dependency will maintain or improve their employment status while in the program.
    - 85% of older and challenged adults served by the older and challenged adult program will remain safely in their own home or other permanent housing.

  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Accomplishments:
    Significantly expanded our support services for victims of domestic violence by adding 5 additional staff members.

    Further expanded our array of services by launching several new programs, including: Parent Cafes, individual recovery coaches for clients battling addiction and specialized services for victims of sexual assault.

    Opened a new outreach location at Westminster Adult & Family Services center on Indianapolis' near East-side, to improve service access for struggling families in a high-need area.

    Achieved a 4-year full re-accreditation by the Council on Accreditation, attesting that the organization continues to meet rigorous national standards for professionals performance.

    Completed a strategic plan to guide the organization in excellence through 2019.

    Completed acquisition of Mental Health America of Greater Indianapolis, a local affiliate of Mental Health America providing pubic and professional education in the area of mental health, adult guardianship, and crisis hotline services.

    Major work in progress:

    Improved technology including server application, electronic medical records, donor and communications software.

    Expansion of facility space at main office to allow for additional therapy space.

    Becoming an employer of choice to get through the national shortage of therapists and counselors.

    Expansion of volunteer program and opportunities within the organization.

    Increased community recognition and awareness.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Indiana

We serve Marion, Hamilton, Boone, Hendricks, Hancock and Morgan counties in Central Indiana.

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

None of the services provided by Families First are fully funded through government reimbursements, contracts, and participant fees. Sliding scale fees ensure that individuals and families receive professional assistance regardless of their financial circumstances. Philanthropic dollars help bridge the gap between the actual costs to provide the service with the reimbursement rate or rate charged.

Accreditations

Council on Accreditation (COA) [for Children and Family Services] - Accreditation

Affiliations + Memberships

Alliance for Children and Families - Member

United Way Member Agency

External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

Families First Indiana, Inc.
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Families First Indiana, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

President & CEO

Mr. David Siler

BIO

Prior to coming to Families First, David served as the Executive Director of the secretariat (department) of Catholic Charities and Family Ministries for the Archdiocese of Indianapolis. Before serving as the Executive Director, he was the agency director of St. Elizabeth Coleman pregnancy and adoption services.

David holds a master of social work degree from Indiana University, an undergraduate degree in business, and is a licensed clinical social worker. For 25 years, he has been in and out of private practice, providing primarily marriage and family counseling.

David served on the state's “reaching parents in crisis" task force that resulted in the Safe Haven legislation and a statewide task force to explore ways to reduce the state's recidivism rates for prisoners. Most recently, he was instrumental in assisting the Indiana state Catholic bishops in writing a letter on the issue of poverty. David has a deep passion for being a voice for those suffering due to poverty and vulnerability.

STATEMENT FROM THE President & CEO

"In early 2016, I was privileged to be asked to lead this exceptional organization with an excellent reputation in the community.

Over twenty years ago, when I was a Master of Social Work student at Indiana University, I completed my first internship at Families First (then called Family Service Association), so this is a bit like coming home for me. However, the home has grown tremendously since that time. Without question, Families First is serving more people than ever, and working even harder to achieve the vision of a community of healthy, capable and loving families.

With the great privilege I feel to serve our community, I also have deep concern for the growing needs of individuals and families. The opioid epidemic, the increasing numbers of individuals struggling with mental illness and the disturbing growth in violence are among the enormous challenges facing our community. I look ahead with great determination to be a part of the solution, and we will rely on your support more than ever to help us continue our mission of service – as Families First has done since 1835.
"

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Chris York

ACES

Term: July 2015 - July 2017

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?