Young Audiences of Indiana, Inc.

We empower youth in learning through the arts.

aka Arts for Learning Indiana   |   Indianapolis, IN   |  http://artsforlearningindiana.org/

Mission

Arts for Learning, the Indiana Affiliate of Young Audiences, empowers youth and expands their learning through creative arts experiences. Based in Indianapolis, Arts for Learning is the oldest and largest provider of professional arts education programs for children in the state. We fulfill our mission through performances, workshops, and residency programs conducted by professional teaching artists in, after, and out of school. We augment this with an array of professional development opportunities designed to help teachers and teaching artists work together to integrate the arts into any educational environment.

Ruling year info

1975

President

Ms. Anya Aslanova

Main address

546 E. 17th St. Ste 200

Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

35-1148812

NTEE code info

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

Arts Service Activities/Organizations (A90)

Community Celebrations (A27)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Arts for Learning values the right of every child to have access to the arts and the participatory creative experiences that unlock minds and expand lives. We believe that all young people need the opportunity to engage in quality arts learning experiences that nurture creativity, cultural awareness, and the development of critical thinking and creative learning skills. We are particularly committed to serving children who are culturally at-risk because of limited access to arts education. These children come from a variety of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds, from both rural and urban communities throughout the state.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

ArtForce

ArtForce is a three-week, paid summer apprenticeship program that introduces high school students to the arts as a potential collegiate and career path. Presented in partnership with local colleges, including Ivy Tech Community College and Marian University, ArtForce enables teens to gain marketable skills by building artistic portfolios, developing lesson plans for elementary-age students, and exploring the arts as a tool to bring about social change. In 2016, the program expanded to two tracks, one in visual arts and the other in performing arts, to better serve the multifaceted interests of the teens.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Our early childhood education initiatives aim to engage our youngest audiences in age-appropriate and meaningful arts experiences. These initiatives include: Young-at-Arts, which provides children ages three to five with unique experiences in the arts through engaging hands-on activities and participatory performances; TAG Along, a series of supplemental studio workshops for the Toddler Art Group (TAG) at the Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields ; and the Lullaby program, which introduces children ages six months to three years to music and dance.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers

Fresh StART Indy engages residents of underserved communities in unified, school-based efforts to improve their neighborhoods through art.

In 2015, through a grant from the Community Crime Prevention Program Fund of the Central Indiana Community Foundation, Fresh StART was piloted on the Near Eastside of Indianapolis. Arts for Learning solicited input from the students at Thomas D. Gregg Elementary, their families, and other local residents on how the community could work together to improve the neighborhood. A vacant lot across from the art classroom of the school was selected as the site of the project and, during a series of workshops hosted by Arts for Learning, the students used art-based strategies to develop alternate views of the abandoned property. Lead teaching artist Meredith Brickell, a resident herself of the Near Eastside, gathered the ideas from the students, many of whom wanted to clean up trash, build a playground, and help families move into the abandoned homes in the area. Based on one student's desire to cloud watch, Brickell conceived of the “Cloud Observatory,” an architectural sculpture that invites residents to take a moment to watch the clouds.

Since then, Fresh StART has expanded through nine projects throughout the state, ranging from a star-gazing structure at the Girl Scouts of Central Indiana's Camp Dellwood to an anti-bullying mural at Thomas A. Hendricks Elementary School in Shelbyville.

Population(s) Served
Students
Families

Inside Arts harnesses the power of creative writing, storytelling, and the visual and performing arts to inspire young offenders to transform their lives. The ultimate goal of the program is to meet the need of our partner facilities for creative, productive activities while also providing the at-risk and incarcerated individuals whom they serve with the opportunity to build positive social skills and self-esteem.

Inside Arts currently serves four juvenile detention centers in Central Indiana; Craine House, a work-release facility for non-violent female offenders; the Marion County Jail; Lutherwood Residential Treatment Center, a licensed Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facility that specializes in the care and treatment of children who exhibit chronic behavioral and/or emotional problems; and the Julian Center, an emergency shelter for victims of domestic violence.

Population(s) Served
Incarcerated people
At-risk youth

Inspiring Scholars is a four-week summer enrichment program presented in partnership with Summer Advantage USA. The creative activities are designed not only to complement Summer Advantage academic curriculum but also to raise the students' teamwork skills and self-confidence in their abilities.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Unemployed people

School Partnerships are supported through grants and school matching funds. We work with educators to design a plan that combines our Signature Core Services (performances, workshops, residencies, and teacher professional development opportunities) to meet each school’s specific needs.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Arts for Learning (A4L) Lessons is a rigorous, research-based literacy program that blends the creativity and discipline of the arts with literature to raise student achievement in reading and reading comprehension. Each A4L Unit includes 12 to 18 hours of sequential, cumulative lessons anchored in at least one well-recognized literary work. The Units are designed for certified teachers with little or no arts experience or background. Teachers can be trained in each Unit in as few as four in-service hours by veteran Arts for Learning teaching artists.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of schools visited at least once

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of unduplicated children served. 2020 total is reflective of decreased programming due to COVID-19. (Prior to 2016, numbers are duplicated.)

Average number of programs experienced per participant

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric relates to our total attendance. For example, in 2017 when we counted 49,703 unduplicated children, our total attendance was 91,548. On average then, each child experienced 1.8 programs.

Number of clients reporting increased knowledge after educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We began tracking this metric along with unduplicated attendance in 2016.

Average number of dollars per person served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Calculated by dividing program expenses by the total attendance.

Hours of expertise provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Dollar price per hour of expertise

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Excluding supplies, for visual artists, and cartage, for musicians.

Total number of performances

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Excluding residency workshops.

Total number of residencies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A residency is defined as 4+ workshops at a site.

Percent of participants who come from low-income households

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We only began to track low-income (free/reduced price school meals) demographics in 2016.

Percent of participants who are racial/ethnic minorities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

We only began to track racial/ethnic demographics in 2016.

Number of teaching artists contracted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of dollars received per donor

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of donations made by board members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Board members are requested to make an annual gift of at least $1,000 and purchase tickets for all Arts for Learning fundraising events.

Number of grants received

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We have engaged with the national Young Audiences Arts for Learning office and other affiliates to create a platform from which all Arts for Learning programs are developed. Our Signature Core Services (performances, workshops, residencies, and teacher professional development) are participant-centered, outcome-based and measurably effective. Each of our programs are carefully constructed around the following Four Essential Elements: Those who participate in an Arts for Learning program will 1) experience the work of professional artists, 2) understand the art form in relation to the world around them, 3) create the art form themselves, and 4) connect the art form to other academic learning and life skill development.

We convene resources, provide programming, and work collaboratively with others to make the arts a part of every child's life and assure a significant presence for the arts in every educational environment. Our mission is focused solely on arts in education, allowing children not only to experience and create various art forms with instruction from trained teaching artists but also to utilize the arts as a tool for learning in other curricular areas.

All Arts for Learning programs are curriculum-based and designed to meet state and national standards in the arts discipline and other subjects presented. Over the past decade, we have developed more in-depth residencies and stronger school- or district-wide relationships in order to enrich student experiences and increase lasting impact. Programs have a companion guide highlighting the state standards, suggested pre- and post- activities, logistics of the program, a page for parents/guardians, and the artist's biography.

Arts for Learning selects artists based on their excellence in artistry, educational relevance, and communication skills. Our rigorous audition process includes the submission of an application, an interview, an audition with the Program Committee of the Board of Directors and an in-school audition with students.

Arts for Learning's artistic visioning is led by President and CEO, JoEllen Florio Rossebo, and Senior Director of Programs, Ploi Pagdalian. In 2015, JoEllen was appointed to the Community Arts Team for Any Given Child Indy, an initiative of the Kennedy Center, and named President of the Indianapolis Consortium of Arts Administrators. Ploi recently became a certified Dimensions of Success (DoS) observer. DoS is an observation tool developed by the Program in Education, Afterschool and Resiliency that is used to assess STEM program quality in out-of-school time.

Arts for Learning currently employs six additional full-time and one part-time staff as well as seasonal interns. The Programming Department includes two Program Directors who manage assigned regions of school and community partnerships and a Director of Artist Programs who recruits, trains, manages, and evaluates the roster of teaching artists. The Development Department is comprised of a Director, who is charged with designing and implementing a comprehensive development plan, and a Grants and Stewardship Manager, who is responsible for researching and applying for competitive grant opportunities from federal, state and local agencies and organizations, and a Marketing & Communications Specialist, who manages all public relations, marketing, and social media efforts. Our staff also includes a part-time Accountant.

Perhaps the biggest ongoing challenge we face is our ability to convey the value of not only our programs but arts in education programs in general to potential partners, namely schools, given the fierce competition for their diminishing resources. Arts for Learning recognizes that data, such as academic or developmental data, and qualitative and quantitative results are increasingly important to conveying the value of our programs to potential partners and funders. JoEllen Florio Rossebo, President and CEO, and Ploi Pagdalian, Senior Director of Programs, met with Dr. Khaula Murtadha, Vice Chancellor of the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) Family, School, and Neighborhood Engagement, IUPUI Office of Community Engagement, in November 2016 to discuss introducing a participatory evaluation plan at Arts for Learning. Participatory evaluation is a collaborative method of evaluation in which partners, program beneficiaries, and key decision makers actively engage in developing the evaluation and all phases of its implementation. Through this partnership approach, those who have a stake in the program—from Arts for Learning staff and teaching artists to school and community partners—work together to identify relevant questions; plan the evaluation design; select appropriate measures and data collection methods; gather and analyze data; reach consensus about findings, conclusions, and recommendations; and share results and prepare an action plan to improve program performance. As we continue to weigh the benefits of using a participatory approach to evaluation at Arts for Learning, we recognize such a model would revolutionize the way we collect data and assess our programs.

We continue our efforts to build a presence in other areas of the state, outside of the Indianapolis metropolitan area, despite the dearth of funding opportunities in small town and rural locations. We are also mindful of educator feedback, which has voiced a need for more flexible, innovative programming options tailored to the individual schools. For example, with a grant from the Indiana Arts Commission's Partnering Arts, Communities, and Education program, we collaborated with teaching artist Melli Hoppe to create and implement a three-year residency at Pine Elementary in Michigan City. The residency focused on dance integration with literacy concepts as third graders learned about the Indiana Dunes, wrote their own books about the landscape, and created their own dances inspired by their research. This program is unique to the school it serves, and presents a model that could easily be replicated in other communities.

Financials

Young Audiences of Indiana, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Young Audiences of Indiana, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 3/30/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Susan Oliver

Salesforce

Term: 2022 - 2020

Tami Earnhart

Ice Miller LLP

Daphne Chiu

Citizens Water

Anson Keller

DKGR Architects

Allison Meta

Chubb Group of Insurance Companies

Susan Oliver

Salesforce

Anne Surak

Art + Space

Lisa Boncosky

self-employed photographer and community volunteer

Susan Gran Michal

A Children's Habitat

Kate Appel

community volunteer

Sarah Walter

Managed Health Services

Charlie Schlegel

School Community Insight

Dorene Hoops

Community Volunteer

Todd Clevenger

Hamilton County

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/08/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

No data

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability