Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana, Inc.

Together, we are defenders of potential.

aka BBBSCI   |   Indianapolis, IN   |  http://www.bebigforkids.org

Mission

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana creates and supports one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth.

Ruling year info

1975

CEO

Mrs. Darcey Palmer-Shultz

Main address

1433 N Meridian St

Indianapolis, IN 46202 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

35-1323831

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

Adult, Child Matching Programs (O30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BBBSCI has a wait list of youth whose parents/guardians have asked for our service, confirming the demand for mentoring. In recent years, there are 900-1,000+ youth waiting for a mentor on any given day. Of these youth waiting, 35% currently reside in one of the six focus zip codes that were previously identified by the City as neighborhoods in need of collaboration and concentration of services to address growing crime and low quality of life issues for residents. To help address this need, we made the commitment in our 5 year strategic plan to serve 1,500 youth annually by the year 2020 throughout Central Indiana.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana (BBBSCI) provides children (ages 8 to 18) facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported 1-to-1 relationships that change their lives for the better, forever – helping youth achieve higher aspirations, greater confidence, educational success, and avoidance of risky behaviors. BBBSCI serves 1,300 children annually in Marion, Hamilton, and Johnson Counties.

Become a Big Brother, Big Sister, Big Friend, or Big Couple and mentor a child in BBBSCI's one-to-one youth mentoring program.

Community-based Bigs:
Bigs and Littles meet in the community to share fun activities and a little bit of themselves. Matches meet 2-4 times per month for a minimum of one year in the community.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children

Where we work

Accreditations

United Way of Central Indiana Accreditation 2020

Awards

Gold Standard Award 2019

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of mentors recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed social skills (e.g., interpersonal communication, conflict resolution)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of youth who demonstrate that they have developed positive relationships

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of youth who demonstrate that they avoid risky behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of youth mentored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Big Brothers Big Sisters works to ensure we are addressing the needs of the community by providing a caring adult in the life of a child. These caring relationships can have a positive impact on otherwise potential risk factors. Some of those indicators include but are not limited to:
Working with families below the poverty line
Identifying the family status
Supporting youth involved in the juvenile justice system
Referring families to other community agencies to ensure basic needs are met
Supporting immigrant families
Working with youth with disabilities
Supporting LGBTQ youth and adults
Engaging local law enforcement and first responders as mentors
Encouraging youth to graduate from high school
Providing scholarship for youth to attend college or trade school

In our 2017-2022 strategic plan, our primary goal is to serve 1,500 youth annually by 2022. To accomplish this, we are focused on volunteer engagement, visibility and marketing, sustainable funding, and staff attraction and retention.

Beyond formal initiatives, BBBSCI works collaboratively in many ways to accomplish our mission. Examples of our collaborative work are as follows:
1) To serve new or specific populations - To engage new volunteers and/or reach new/specific populations of youth, BBBSCI will develop collaborations with specific purposes or objectives.
2) To engage volunteers - BBBSCI partners with companies, faith organizations, colleges, and other community organizations to recruit volunteer mentors. For many of these, efforts are focused around neighborhood priorities of partner organizations.
3) To provide opportunities to matches - BBBSCI partners with more than 125 other organizations and businesses to provide free/discounted activities and opportunities to matches. Other partners host events for matches or offer free tickets to local events.
4) To maximize impact for youth - BBBSCI partners strategically with initiatives or other efforts to benefit youth we serve and support broader community initiatives.
5) To connect youth and families to additional services - BBBSCI partners with other services and organizations to connect youth and families to other resources they may need while waiting for BBBSCI service or while enrolled in our program. This often includes mental health or basic needs referrals, but also aims to inform families of other beneficial programming in the community.
6) To build a bridge between mentors and schools - BBBSCI has formal partnerships with 50+ elementary, middle, and high schools throughout Marion, Hamilton, and Johnson counties. These school partnerships were established to generate youth referrals to the BBBSCI program, allow mentors to visit youth at school, and connect mentors to the academic lives of their mentees.
7) To generate funding and awareness - BBBSCI builds mutually beneficial relationships with many funders, sponsors, and partners in the community to raise the funds and awareness necessary to support our mission. Whenever possible, BBBSCI aims to build layered relationships with financial supporters that could open doors for volunteers or other opportunities for our program.

BBBSCI's one-to-one mentoring program (our only program) is proven to improve academic engagement and success, avoidance of risky behaviors, and socio-emotional competency. We use the formula Length + Strength = Outcomes as a basis for measuring successful program results. We know the longer a match lasts (measure match retention rate) and the stronger the relationship (measure strength of relationship) the greater number and greater significant of outcomes that will be achieved by the youth (measure with outcome survey).

BBBSCI utilizes a number of evaluation tools and methods to thoroughly assess strengths and weaknesses, make adjustments and plan for the future, to inform funding requests and our Board, and to report on our progress to stakeholders and the community. BBBSCI tracks many program metrics monthly to oversee and improve operations as well as results. Through ongoing evaluation, we monitor the outcomes of our youth (Youth Outcome Survey), the strength of mentoring relationships (Strength of Relationship Surveys and monthly contacts), the satisfaction of our Bigs and Parents (satisfaction surveys), and the satisfaction with agency sponsored activities (activity surveys). This information is then used to make adjustments and provide individualized coaching to the volunteers and youth served by our program. It is also used to make system-wide changes to continually refine and strengthen program results. Additionally, being a learning organization, we have conducted two Six Sigma program improvement projects which guide the implementation and measurement of many program improvements.

We also collect feedback from electronic surveys twice a year specifically on satisfaction and outcomes from parents and mentors in addition to collecting feedback immediately following the enrollment process. We collect ongoing feedback during monthly contacts (phone calls/in-person meetings) with staff and use the BBBSA Strength of Relationship survey tool to ensure child safety and relationship progression. In both of our Six Sigma projects, the "voice of the customer" was obtained to collect a significant amount of feedback from our stakeholders (mostly volunteers and parents) prior to making program improvement decisions

After spending over five years focusing on improvements in program quality and impact, we were confident that we were providing the best quality of service in our agency’s history. Meanwhile, we were serving 1,100 youth annually and our demand for service grew significantly from 300 youth to more than 1,000 youth on the waiting list. This combination of increased demand for service and confidence in programmatic quality and impact positioned us to begin the deliberate process to grow our scale of service. Our Board and staff established a 2017-2022 strategic plan focused on growth in service to 1,500 youth annually. In the first and second years of this plan, we served more than 1,200 relationships and more than 1,300 relationships, respectively. During this third year of the strategic plan, we plan to serve more than 1,400 mentoring relationships.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/13/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs. Raquel Richardson

Centric Consulting

Term: 2018 - 2020


Board co-chair

Mrs. Gwen Langley

Cummins Inc.

Term: 2018 - 2020

Aaron Boyle

Midland Atlantic Properties

Andrew Detherage

Barnes & Thornburg

Susan Kleinman

Butler University

Susan Brock Williams

Purdue University

Nicole Bickett

Springbuk

Brandi Davis-Handy

Project Lead the Way, Inc.

Sally Grant

Crew Carwash

Tom Herman

Retired, Herman & Kittle Properties, Inc.

Samuel Hodson

Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP

Gwen Langley

Cummins Inc.

Valory Myers

InAct LLC

Jim Pease

Retired, Ernst & Young LLP

Raquel Richardson

Centric Consulting

Tom Cheatham

HomeAdvisor

Patty Turner

NextGear Capital

Drew Hall Linn

Counterpart

Cindy Schum

A.G. Maas Company

Julie Bowen

Community Volunteer Leader

Karen Cecil

Cummins Inc.

Mike Daugherty

First Merchants Private Wealth Advisors

Eric Lis

Southern Glazer's Wine and Spirits

Heather Perry

Dauby O'Connor & Zaleski, LLC

Daniel Pierson

Eli Lilly and Company

Jack Walker

Walker Information

Lisa Norman

First Financial Bank

Jon Robinson

Capitol Construction Services, Inc.

Chad Rogers

Indianapolis Power & Light

Jim Stehlik

Wells Fargo Bank

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/13/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data