Human Services

Youth Guidance

Chicago, IL

Mission

Youth Guidance sees a bright and successful future for every elementary and high school student in Chicago, regardless of their background or circumstances. Because we believe that success in school is not only possible but should be achieved and celebrated, we are present in schools to facilitate an environment that engages students in the learning process, and through careful guidance, enables them to realize their full potential and graduate with a meaningful post-secondary plan. Youth Guidance creates and implements school-based programs that enable at-risk children to overcome obstacles, focus on their education and, ultimately, to succeed in school and in life.

Ruling Year

2003

Chief Executive Officer

Mrs. Michelle A Morrison

Main Address

1 North LaSalle Street Suite 900

Chicago, IL 60602 USA

Keywords

Youth Development, Education, After School Programs, Mental Health Services, At-risk youth, school-based

EIN

36-2167032

 Number

1758270011

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

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Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Community & After School Programs

Becoming A Man (BAM)

Working On Womanhood (WOW)

Workforce Development Program

School-Based Counseling

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of participants engaged in programs

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Context notes

Includes participants in Youth Guidance's BAM, WOW, Counseling, CAP, and Workforce programs.

Percent of WOW students who had fewer trauma symptoms after participating in WOW.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Working On Womanhood (WOW)

Context notes

67% of WOW students score in the clinical range for post-traumatic stress disorder at pre-test

Percent of WOW students who reported that the program has helped them make better decisions for themselves.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Working On Womanhood (WOW)

Percent reduction in violent crime arrests among BAM participants.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Becoming A Man (BAM)

Context notes

Heller,Sara B., Anuj K. Shah, Jonathan Guryan, Jens Ludwig, Sendhil Mullainathan,and Harold A. Pollack. “Thinking, Fast and Slow? Some Field Experiments to ReduceCrime and Dropout in Chicago.” NBER

Percent reduction in overall arrests among BAM participants.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Becoming A Man (BAM)

Context notes

Heller,Sara B., Anuj K. Shah, Jonathan Guryan, Jens Ludwig, Sendhil Mullainathan,and Harold A. Pollack. “Thinking, Fast and Slow? Some Field Experiments to ReduceCrime and Dropout in Chicago.” NBER

Percent increase in on-time graduation rates among BAM participants.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Becoming A Man (BAM)

Context notes

Heller,Sara B., Anuj K. Shah, Jonathan Guryan, Jens Ludwig, Sendhil Mullainathan,and Harold A. Pollack. “Thinking, Fast and Slow? Some Field Experiments to ReduceCrime and Dropout in Chicago.” NBER

Percent of students in Community & Afterschool Programs who reported that participation helped them make friends and have positive interactions with other students.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Community & After School Programs

Percent of families surveyed who stated Youth Guidance as a partner had a positive impact on the school climate and community.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

No target populations selected

Related program

Community & After School Programs

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

Youth Guidance sees a bright and successful future for every elementary and high school student in Chicago, regardless of their background or circumstances. Because we believe that success in school is not only possible but should be achieved and celebrated, we are present in schools to facilitate an environment that engages students in the learning process, and through careful guidance, enables them to realize their full potential and graduate with a meaningful post-secondary plan. Youth Guidance empowers students to become successful socially, emotionally, and academically and to prepare for life during and after high school by promoting the following goals:

• Students will experience social-emotional well-being;
• Students will be engaged in school and succeed academically;
• Students will practice safe and healthy behaviors;
• Students will be prepared for post-secondary success;
• Parents will be engaged in their children's lives and school communities;
• A strong, supportive school community will develop.

Our long term vision, as outlined in our recently completed four-year strategic business plan, includes improving life outcomes for thousands more youth through the significant expansion of Becoming A Man (BAM), embarking on a rigorous outcomes evaluation of Working on Womanhood (WOW) and the continued strengthening of our Counseling, Youth Workforce Development and Community & After School programming.

Youth Guidance meets children where they are, providing tailored interventions that help them grow and succeed. To accomplish our long term vision, Youth Guidance is taking a deliberate approach to expanding programming while preserving program fidelity and learning through rigorous research.

Partners at the University of Chicago suggest that up to 7,000 young men in Chicago might benefit from Youth Guidance's Becoming a Man (BAM) program, and thousands more in other cities. The program's strategy integrates principles of cognitive behavior therapy and mentoring best practices to guide boys into making healthy decisions. Similarly, Working on Womanhood (WOW) engages young women who struggle with trauma and emotional regulation through an assets based approach. WOW is poised to expand to serve 1,750 girls in the 2017-18 school year; BAM will grow to reach 6,000 boys in that time period.

To grow and improve our programming, Youth Guidance developed a four year strategic business plan and is working with public and private partners to achieve sustainable growth. To establish a reliable evidence base for our programming, Youth Guidance continues to partner with the University of Chicago to conduct rigorous research of both BAM and WOW. WOW is preparing to undergo a randomized controlled trial evaluation, similar to those implemented under BAM.

Youth Guidance is a well established and trusted service provider, working in partnership with Chicago Public Schools since 1969. As school-based service providers, Youth Guidance staff works closely with school administration as well as with community partners and peer organizations to coordinate services and avoid duplication of efforts.

Given the agency's recent expansion, Youth Guidance has grown its staff of highly qualified practitioners. The Becoming a Man (BAM) and Working on Womanhood (WOW) programs are delivered by experienced and credentialed social workers/counselors/youth development practitioners. Given research that suggests the importance of counselor relationships in both programs, Youth Guidance prioritizes hiring highly qualified individuals who can provide culturally competent interventions and build strong relationships with students.

Youth Guidance is also supported by a strong leadership team, an invested Board of Directors, dedicated Advisory Boards for our WOW and BAM programs, and community commitment as part of Chicago's Mayor's Mentoring Initiative. Youth Guidance maintains a central staff of marketing, fundraising, finance, and evaluation professionals to ensure that the agency's growth and impact are reaching their best potential.

Youth Guidance's Evaluation and Quality Improvement Department coordinates the evaluation of agency programs and facilitates organizational learning. Youth Guidance evaluates BAM and WOW participants in four areas: 1) Program Engagement; 2) Social-Emotional Development; 3) Academic Engagement and Achievement; and 4) Utilization of Safe and Healthy Behaviors. Both programs work from separate but similar metrics that include extensive outcomes and targets for students. Some of these progress measures include:

- 60% of BAM participants who scored low to fair asset scores will show improvement between the pre- and post-tests on the Developmental Assets Profile (DAP).
- The aggregate number of BAM participant arrests will be lower than their school-based peers on a school-by school basis.
- WOW participants' scores on the following four subscales of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) will improve after participation in WOW: emotional problems, conduct problems, hyperactivity, and peer problems.
- WOW participants' level of depression will decrease after participating in the program, as measured by their scores on the Adolescent Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) Depression Index.
- BAM and WOW Students identified as “at-risk" for low attendance will have a higher attendance rate after participating in the programs.

In addition to annual internal evaluations, Youth Guidance is committed to growing the external evidence base for both BAM and WOW. In June 2016, researchers from the University of Chicago Crime Lab announced results from their second study of BAM, which showed that participants were 50% less likely to be arrested for violent crime and 19% more likely to graduate high school on time than their nonparticipating peers. BAM has also undergone a qualitative research study by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, which has helped to identify the program components and mechanisms that lead to successful student outcomes. WOW is growing its research readiness and preparing for a similar trajectory. WOW completed a year-long curriculum refinement process and is now finishing a process evaluation on the newly refined curriculum, realized through a community-academic partnership with Chicago's Lurie Children's Hospital. Next year, WOW will begin its first randomized controlled trial (RCT) by the University of Chicago Urban Labs under partnership and funding from the U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

Youth Guidance utilizes a multifaceted approach to inform its programs. Both quantitative and qualitative studies are used to inform curricula refinement, program fidelity measures, and growth strategies. School level data helps the agency to assess how the programs are functioning in the unique contexts of each site. Youth engagement data is also used to ensure the programs are responsive to participants' needs.

Youth Guidance serves over 8,500 students in 90 schools each year, touching the lives of up to 14,000 parents, children, school staff, and community members. Youth Guidance's BAM program has grown 423% since 2012 to serve 2,793 students at 50 Chicago Public Schools in FY16. Early growth was driven by a Social Innovation Fund grant from the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, which yielded an expansion strategy that promoted sustainable growth and fidelity to BAM's validated program model.

Researchers at the University of Chicago Crime Lab found that BAM participants were 50% less likely to be arrested for violent crime than their peers in the control group and 35% less likely to be arrested overall. For every dollar invested in BAM, society receives $30 in benefits from the impacts on crime alone. BAM participants were 25% more engaged in school, based upon an index of school attendance, GPA, and persistence data. Based on their research, the Crime Lab concluded that BAM participants are 19% more likely to graduate high school on time.

The WOW program has grown since 2011 to serve over 1,200 girls this school year. Program staff have spent the past two years completing a rigorous curriculum refinement and process evaluation, ensuring the program's fidelity and research readiness as it prepares to expand and evaluate WOW's impact.

External Reviews

Awards & Accreditations

Council on Accreditation (COA)

Financials

Youth Guidance

Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2016
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Not Applicable

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity