360 YOUTH SERVICES

Changing Lives, Inspiring Hope

Naperville, IL   |  https://360youthservices.org/

Mission

360 Youth Services' mission is to provide life-changing services to youth through substance use prevention education, counseling and housing.

Notes from the nonprofit

We are in the middle of strategic planning and will update our plan when available (as of April 2021).

Ruling year info

1978

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Judie Caribeaux

Main address

1305 Oswego Road

Naperville, IL 60540 USA

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Formerly known as

NCO Youth & Family Services

EIN

36-2936229

NTEE code info

Alcohol, Drug Abuse (Prevention Only) (F21)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

360 Youth Services provides community-based social services for youth and their families. We assist youth and their families by encircling them with support and services as they navigate through challenges, heal trauma, and grow into healthy independence.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Power of Choice

360 Youth Services coordinates this highly effective and proven drug and alcohol abuse prevention campaign for students in school districts 203 and 204 and their parents. The Power of Choice initiative focuses on correcting misperceptions about the prevalence of substance use and emphasizes that most students are making healthy choices regarding tobacco, alcohol and drugs. It utilizes classroom presentations, posters, journals located in school bathroom stalls, and many types of media and communication tools.

Ultimately, the high school based program acknowledges that when a community consistently supports its students' healthy choices, the number of kids making good decisions about substance abuse actually increases.

The Power of Choice also includes a communications campaign for district 203 & 204 sixth through eighth grade students and their parents. This campaign increases knowledge around risk and harm associated with alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs use.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Snowball is a fun and engaging youth leadership development and substance abuse prevention program that provides a safe and respectful environment for high school students to learn and grow. The program features several retreat weekends designed by youth, with adult support, to address the needs of teenagers today through workshops, activities, and small group discussions.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

The Transitional Housing Program helps homeless non-parenting young adults, 18-24 years old, by offering them apartment housing and structured support services while they work to improve daily living and job skills, and secure employment. Residents can stay in the program for up to 24 months and professionally trained staff are available every day.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
At-risk youth

Cornerstone Group Home is a short-term, residential home for boys, ages 13-17, who have had involvement with the juvenile justice or child welfare systems, and who are unable to live with their families due to an abusive situation, emotional or behavioral instability. The program provides a stable place to live and focuses on education and life skills as the boys anticipate transition to a more permanent living situation.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Men and boys

Groups for youth of all ages build confidence and teach skills so they can better manage the challenges in their lives. Groups address issues such as bullying, self-esteem building, dealing with social pressures and adapting to change. These programs also offer a change to meet new friends, and often involve parents so they can be an ongoing source of support for their children.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The pressures on today's youth are greater than any other previous generation. 360 Youth Services believes that connecting youth with a strong, independent adult mentor can help them become more confident and better able to cope with life's challenges such as low self-esteem, pressure to perform academically and socially, substance abuse, peer pressure, and even family violence and abuse. Mentors work with children or young adults, ages 13-24 years, many of whom currently live in one of 360 Youth Services' housing programs.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

360's services go beyond what occurs in a typical counseling hour, beginning with a professional counselor taking the initial call, and using their expertise to match the individual with the right counselor. 360 Counselors work collaboratively with the client, to resolve challenges and concerns, all while teaching skills to use for a lifetime.

360's customized approach may involve connection the client with other services within the agency, conducting sessions at a youth's school, or linking up with other community resources and service providers.

Regardless of the format, 360 Counselors focus on strengths, identify goals, and create a path toward increased self-esteem and satisfaction. A full spectrum of life-changing services is provided - it's what makes 360 Youth Services different.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The Transitional Housing Program helps LBGTQ-designated non-parenting homeless young adults, 18-21 years old, by offering them apartment housing and structured support services while they work to improve daily living and job skills, and secure employment.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adolescents

The Transitional Housing Program helps homeless non-parenting young women, 18-21 years old, by offering them apartment housing and structured support services while they work to improve daily living and job skills, and secure employment. Residents can stay in the program for up to 24 months and professionally trained staff are available every day.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adolescents

In-school programs for middle/Jr high/high school students identified as potentially engaging in risky social behavior. This provides Alternative to Suspension, Suspension Reduction, and General Youth Support, including prevention services for alcohol and drugs, aggression, attitudes and behaviors, community and peer relationships, school beliefs, skill building, and family and environmental support.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Students

Where we work

Awards

All Children-All Families Innovator Seal of Recognition 2019

Human Rights Campaign

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of middle/high school youth who choose to attend counseling at school rather than serve suspension out of school. This fulfills a new mandate in Illinois which aims to raise graduation rate.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Students

Related Program

School-Based Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Piloted in 2017 in 3 high schools, success rates resulted in a request to serve all (10) high schools and middle schools in District 204.

Number of youth-at-risk who complete counseling services who show an increase in protective factors or a decrease in risk factors according to the YASi.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Counseling

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Results are clients who completed the YASI at the end of counseling. Every year more youth say that they have positive change after counseling, now up to 89% of those counseled.

Number of youth in the LGBTQ Transitional Housing programs who exited to safe and stable housing when they graduate from the program, thus breaking the cycle of homelessness.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

LGBTQ people, Young adults

Related Program

Transitional Housing Program LGBTQ

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Piloted in 2014 and expanded as needed to serve youth of all gender identity and experssion. Youth don't graduate until they possess living skills for independent living.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Specific challenges are identified, and appropriate resources are marshaled to enable youth to reach their potential as they mature. We use a trauma-informed approach in all facets of our programs. 360 embraces its responsibility to foster a climate where all youth can thrive.

360 Youth Services meets youth where they are. Clinicians, counselors and trained facilitators go into schools to reach students, and meet youth in one on one counseling sessions at 360's counseling offices to identify problems and create solutions. Counseling is being offered as an alternative to suspension from school, and more students are graduating rather than dropping out. Facilitators distribute information in local schools on the changing dangers of substance abuse, including drugs, alcohol and tobacco; reduction of use among students has been the result. 360 operates transitional housing for male, female, and LGBTQ+ youth experiencing homelessness. A mentoring program matches trained community mentors with youth recommended by local civic groups and law enforcement, giving youth caring support.

360's counselors and program facilitators are educated in handling trauma-based challenges. All classroom facilitators and mentors undergo training prior to meeting students in classrooms. This agency has the backing of many official groups, including police departments, local schools, cities, and local civic groups, and that backing is both financial and in the form of volunteers. We are ready to expand our capability to provide programs for our youth in response to need by youth in our community.

In almost 20 years of providing transitional housing to homeless youth, over 550 young men and women have come through the program and are now employed and are living in stable, safe housing. Every year nearly 25,000 youth in local schools are made aware of the dangers of substance abuse, and an increasing number are choosing not to use. Since starting onsite counseling at schools, over 200 students have chosen to seek counseling and not serve out-of-school suspension; the graduation rate among these students is rising, and the program is expanding into many schools. Mentoring is on the increase; both schools and police departments know the value of a dedicated mentor for a youth in need, and 360 would like to expand the program into the community since it's a success for the youth in 360's housing programs. We would love to expand all of these programs since they're all positive approaches in the quest to assist youth in reaching their potential.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    1) Youth who engage in mental health therapy 2) Youth who are experiencing homelessness 3) Students in middle and high school 4) Youth who are low income 5) Youth who identify as having disabilities 6) Youth who have experienced trauma

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    1) We added an additional service, an Emergency Shelter Program, based on increased need noted from communications within the community and through direct inquiries. 2) We changed an optional staff lunch event into a time to discuss an employee's recent involvement with a Healing Circle based on feedback from the employee and the Culture Team.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

360 YOUTH SERVICES
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

360 YOUTH SERVICES

Board of directors
as of 4/22/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Martin Ives

H.B. Taylor Co.

Term: 2019 - 2021

Ann Bertino

Pellis Law Group, LLP

Christine Peggau

TIDI Products, LLC

Mark McGrath

Ankura Consulting Group, LLC

Danya Grunyk

Grunyk Family Law

Nancie ElShafei

Navitas Systems, LLC

Peter Paolilli

Altair Advisors

Dr. Sanjeeb Khatua

Edward Elmhurst Health

Jennifer Jones

Small Smiles, LLC

Leonard Jones

Pitney Bowes

Alex Harris

Metropolitan Family Services

Oriana Van Someren

d'aprile properties

Gary Graves

G2 Advisors

Britt Wagner

Edward Jones

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/22/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/22/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.