Arthroscopy Association of North America Inc

Advancing the Scope

aka AANA   |   Rosemont, IL   |  http://www.aana.org

Mission

The mission of the Arthroscopy Association of North America is to advance the art and science of arthroscopy and minimally invasive surgery through education, skills assessment and advocacy.

Ruling year info

1983

CEO

Ms Laura M Downes

Main address

9400 W Higgins Rd Ste 200

Rosemont, IL 60018 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

36-3166049

NTEE code info

Professional Societies & Associations (E03)

Surgery (G9B)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Mandated case-log requirements and reduction in work hours for residency training programs by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education, combined with the pressure of resource-intensive operating room instruction time has resulted in increased reliance on cadaveric models to provide hands-on experience to acquire technically difficult surgical skills. Unfortunately, maintenance of cadaveric labs and arthroscopic equipment is costly, and clinical obligations limit the amount of time available for direct instruction by expert faculty. Additionally, the nature of this model restricts the necessary repetition to acquire skills, and limits an objective assessment of the trainee’s performance.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Improved Arthroscopic Simulator Training Methodologies

In addition to providing a series of scientific meetings and events throughout the year, as well as webinars and online education, one of the central purposes of AANA is to provide hands-on training in the most up-to-date, minimally-invasive orthopedic procedures. We accomplish this in our state of the art Orthopedic Learning Center, a dedicated 14,000 sq ft facility with meeting, seminar, and conference space, including a 6000 sq ft laboratory with 28 fully-equipped workstations to accommodate biological (cadaver) training models as well as high definition virtual reality arthroscopic simulators.

Population(s) Served
People with physical disabilities
People with diseases and illnesses

Arthroscopic continuing medical education (CME) continues to be the cornerstone of AANA's mission and Educational Program focus. AANA is leading advancement, driving research, and developing cutting-edge education methods to support the arthroscopy specialty. AANA encourages, supports and fosters the development and dissemination of knowledge of arthroscopic surgery to improve upon the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and injuries of the musculo-skeletal system. AANA Educational activities are designed to improve physician competence, performance, and patient outcomes through an array of educational delivery formats. These include:

Annual Meeting

The goal of the Annual Meeting is to offer attendees content that reflects leading-edge clinical and scientific research in the field of arthroscopy. The Annual Meeting includes lectures, abstract presentations, and focused-topic instructional course lectures, and also panel discussions, case-presentations, debates, electronic poster presentations, and live simulcast surgeries.

Lab Courses

AANA offers eight or more lab courses each year combining hands-on education with didactic sessions and case presentations. Lab courses are held in the Orthopedic Learning Center (OLC) which serves as the main location for AANA’s skills training courses for all levels of orthopedists from residents through advanced practitioners. AANA lab courses contain several components, including: hands-on experience with simulators and specific cadaver models, knot-tying, lectures, case-discussions and panels.

Specialty Courses are held in conjunction with the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, and are a full day program of didactic sessions and panel discussions on targeted joints and surgical techniques.

The Online CME Program addresses the needs of members for convenient web-based learning. The AANA Online activity portfolio includes:

- On-demand Annual Meeting General Sessions, Instructional Course Lectures, and content captured from AANA lab courses, which include a pre-test, synchronized slide and audio, or video for review, and a post-test. The format allows for learners to start, stop and return based on their schedule.

- Self-assessment exams consist of an internet-based assessment exam of 100 clinically relevant multiple-choice questions across all joints.

- PROBE, a push-learning activity which disseminates one-question per week, year-round, via email for answer by the recipient.

Population(s) Served
People with physical disabilities
People with diseases and illnesses

Where we work

Accreditations

Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education - continuous since 1989 - 2020 1989

Awards

eLearning & Live Training for live surgery training – Gold winner 2018

Association Trends

Affiliations & memberships

Journal of Arthroscopy and Arthroscopy Techniques 2001

Orthopedic Learning Center - since 1994 1994

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Develop high-fidelity virtual simulator modules for common and relevant arthroscopic procedures.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with physical disabilities

Related Program

Improved Arthroscopic Simulator Training Methodologies

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We have 17 Modules, and 4 Courses to teach fundamentals principles and motor skills. Knee: 55 modules. Ankle: 13 modules. Hip: 17 modules. Shoulder: 39 modules. Total Courses: 20. Tot Modules: 141.

Number of surgeon trainees and to experienced surgeons attending Skills Courses and Annual Meeting.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with physical disabilities

Related Program

Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We serve our target population indirectly by training those who provide direct service to the general population.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

AANA remains committed to supporting the use of cadaveric specimens during training, and to advance the area of arthroscopic surgery simulation, in order to produce the most valuable arthroscopy education available. To that end, our current goals are to:

- Standardize competency-based virtual reality simulator training and assessment for all resident and fellow trainees.

- Develop more complex musculoskeletal joint and procedure simulations for practicing patient care providers and experienced physicians.

- Collect and analyze complex training and testing metrics to identify strategies that increase the quality of simulation-based assessments of skills.

- Determine the correlation between simulation-based assessment of skills and the quality of clinical care delivered by experienced clinicians.

Working teams assembled from AANA clinical subject matter experts and VirtaMed VR simulator development engineers are organized around specific anatomic structures (hip, shoulder, etc). Through a series of cyclic deliberations, experienced surgeons (key opinion leaders) form a consensus opinion on objective and reliable metrics to teach and assess proficiency in specific procedures, i.e., anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, hip decompression. These validated metrics are refined and translated into teaching and testing modules. These modules are integrated into patented VirtaMed software and hardware models of anatomic structures used at individual stations by practicing physicians and surgical trainees.

Data captured during training and testing is stored, managed, and processed on a network of remote servers hosted on the Internet, and is analyzed individually and collectively to improve the quality of skill assessment. Correlations can then be made between simulation-based assessment of skills and measurable healthcare improvements worldwide.

AANA is an international organization of approximately 6,000 orthopedic surgeons who are committed to advancing the field of minimally-invasive orthopedic surgery and to improve patient outcomes worldwide. Its programs, products and services are guided by 21 committees of members, and executed by a full time staff of 14 professionals. VirtaMed is a Swiss-based company that has developed and produced multiple series of highly realistic surgical simulators for medical training since 2007. With an international staff that includes 65 hardware and software engineers, scientists, analysts and technicians, VirtaMed has 11 issued worldwide and US patents and applications with claims around their AnthroS technology that forms the backbone of the arthroscopic simulators.

The two organizations are in the third year of a collaborative five year effort that has yielded excellent progress and has demonstrated proof of a valuable development process. The combined AANA teaching methodology and the VirtaMed AnthroS simulator technology has resulted in rapid development of tools that increase the efficiency and effectiveness of minimally invasive surgery training in an orthopedic setting.

In 2018 we signed a joint venture (JV) agreement with VirtaMed AG in Zurich to co-develop validated orthopedic training simulators that can be used at AANA’s Orthopedic Learning Center (OLC).

Since that time, we have pooled the expertise of our membership, and concluded an initiative aimed at qualifying training needs and approaches that are most efficient and are validated for content, construct, and relevance.

Together we’ve successfully developed original instruments in conjunction with approved diagnostic curricula for knee, shoulder, and hip pathologies, and fundamentals of arthroscopic techniques, and placed these VR simulators and integrated them into courses offered at the OLC.

An AANA Membership survey confirmed the value of this hands-on VR simulator training, and highlighted the need for expanded capabilities.

The success of this JV prompted an extension of the cooperative Agreement for an additional three years.

Currently we’re expanding the diagnostic capabilities into more ‘modules’ that focus on additional joint pathologies.

We’re increasing the quantity and complexity of the fundamental skillset modules to include common repair and reconstruction techniques.

We’re enhancing the training content and metrics to arthroscopic procedures and developing protocols for skill acquisition and maintenance by experienced surgeons.

We’re planning how to make simulation more accessible.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Surveys, focus groups, and discussion with those we directly serve brought attention to current trends affecting the practice of arthroscopy. One worldwide trend is the evolution of training methods away from cadavers as models and towards more simulation. A second area that became apparent is the need for distance and remote learning opportunities by practicing orthopedists in low resource communities. In response to this feedback, we've implemented a development program aimed at more efficient training in increasingly-complex repair procedures through the use of virtual simulators, and a more portable simulator that can be easily setup and used by rural practitioners far away from teaching facilities in the U.S. and other countries.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Arthroscopy Association of North America Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Arthroscopy Association of North America Inc

Board of directors
as of 2/26/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Brian Cole

Rush University Medical Center

Term: 2020 - 2021

Brian Cole

Rush University Medical Center

Mark Getelman

Southern California Orthopedic Institute

James Stone

Orthopedic Institute of Wisconsin

Larry Field

Mississippi Sports Medicine Institute

John Tokish

Mayo Clinic Arizona

Alan Curtis

Boston Sports and Shoulder Center

Kevin Bonner

Jordan-Young Institute

Paul Caldwell

Tuckahoe Orthopaedics Association

Mary Mulcahey

Tulane University School of Medicine

Denver Stanfield

Wellington Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine

Joseph Tauro

Ocean Country Sports Medicine

Pietro Tonino

Loyola University Chicago

Nikhil Verma

Rush University Medical Center

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/14/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data