CAREER TRANSITIONS CENTER OF CHICAGO

A Career Resource Built Around You

Chicago, IL   |  www.ctcchicago.org

Mission

The Career Transitions Center of Chicago's mission is to empower professionals to find meaningful employment.

Ruling year info

1997

Executive Director

Ms. Anita Jenke

Main address

703 W. Monroe Street

Chicago, IL 60661 USA

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EIN

36-4084309

NTEE code info

Vocational Counseling / Guidance / Testing (J21)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

As the country recovers from the pandemic, CTC to empower under- and unemployed professionals, as well as first generation college students and graduates to find meaningful employment. To accomplish this, CTC provides professional and emotional support to job seekers through career coaching, peer support groups and best practice job search workshops.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Job Search/Career Management

CTC provides job coaching and employment programming to un- and underemployed professionals. The programs range from use of Linked In to updating resumes to time management.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of public events held to further mission

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Job Search/Career Management

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CTC provides workshops at universities, libraries, churches as part of our community outreach strategy. These events serve a total of 500 in an average year.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Job Search/Career Management

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CTC has 50 volunteer career coaches and program facilitators. The average volunteer has been retained for seven years.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Adolescents

Related Program

Job Search/Career Management

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CTC has been serving an average of 300 client each year for the last three years.

Number of hours of coaching

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Job Search/Career Management

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

CTC provides its clients with access to weekly individual coaching sessions to provide strategic career management advice and to provide emotional support.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Goals for 2021-22
1. The board of directors will approve a new three-year strategic plan that includes both a strategic vision for the evolution of services and a plan to sustain CTC operations during a time when it is under pressure to serve large numbers of clients experiencing much longer job searches.
2. Provide 200 programs each year on job search topics, as well as peer support groups.
3. Serve 300 clients as well as 300 members of the community people through outreach programs.
4. Sixty percent of clients will find employment (full-time; contract; start a business) within 12 months of joining CTC.

Programs and Services
The overarching goal of CTC is to successfully facilitate the job searches of its un- and under-employed clients through job coaching, training, support, and fellowship. Our team of 40 career coaches volunteer their time. The In Person Program provides clients with one-on-one coaching, Strong Vocational Interest and EQI assessments, and workshops on resume writing, interviewing, networking, compensation negotiation and emotional resilience during an extended job search. CTC offers over 200 programs each year for its clients, sponsoring organizations, and members of the public. CTC also provides a business center with 10 workstations with computers and phones for conducting job search activities.

For the last seven years, CTC has offered Virtual Services, which combines an online career management system, Optimal Resume—that allows clients to create resumes and other communication tools, store portfolios, engage in mock video interviews from home, as well as to create their own personal website—with phone coaching to clients outside the Chicago Metro Area and the out of state alumni of sponsors such as Elmhurst University. This is a structured 12 week program, as compared to the self directed nature of in-person services at CTC.

CTC shifted to virtual delivery of services (coaching, peer support and job search skills programming) on March 11, 2020, in response to COVID-19. CTC will begin a hybrid delivery model by offering 3 days of virtual coaching and programming and two days of in person coaching and programming, in response to client surveys about the a new delivery model.

Compounding centuries of structural racism, the unemployment crisis is affecting communities of color most dramatically. A Washington Post-Ipsos poll from May 2020 showed that 16% of Black workers reported being laid off, as well as 20% of Latinx workers. At the same time, 11% of white workers and 12% of workers from other racial groups reported being laid off. Because of the massive racial wealth gap in the United States, workers of color have less savings to tide them over until they find their next job. The Brookings Institution reports that Black families have one-tenth the wealth of white families. For all who are out of work, but particularly for Black, Latinx, and Indigenous workers and other workers of color, unemployment benefits are a vital lifeline in this time of crisis. The Bureau of Labor Statistics report projects that 50% of recent college grads are now unemployed.

Programming for First Generation College Grads: CTC provides Virtual one-day Career Boot Camps via Zoom on job search skills workshops, followed by 12 weeks of individualized virtual career coaching; access to workshops, facilitates networking introductions; and provides access to job opportunities. These youth are entering the labor market during some of the highest unemployment rates in U.S. history.

With a budget of $365,000, CTC serves over 300 clients and outreaches via community workshops to serve another 300 plus people. CTC is governed by a volunteer board of 14 members and has a staff of four. Over 40 volunteers help sustain CTC's mission. These professional volunteers serve as board members, job coaches, motivational and informational speakers, computer technicians and development experts.

Over the last 12 months, CTC has served:

* 200 adult clients, 100 youth and provided public programming at libraries, churches and associations serving another 333 people.
* 60% of clients found employment during the pandemic (compared to 80% in the year before the pandemic).
* Retained over 40 volunteers for an average of 7 years.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    CTC serves un- and under-employed professionals, as well as first generation college students and graduates. ADULTS: 70% of clients are 45 years+, worked as a mid-level professional, and were unemployed for 15 months before using our services. Prior to March 2020, 55% lived at or below 200% of the Federal Poverty Level. Clients are 47% Caucasian; 16% Latino or Hispanic; 13% African American; 15% Asian or Pacific Islander; 9% Other Ethnic Groups; 55% Females, 45% Males. CTC adult clients: 55% Low Income; 30% Moderate Income; 15% Middle Income. YOUTH: 70% are African American and 30% are Latino. 75% female and 25% male. The first-generation college graduates report the following: 70% are un- or underemployed. 80% report household incomes at or below 150% of the federal poverty level.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    CTC surveyed its client about service delivery: in person only, virtual or hybrid (combination of in person and virtual). The survey found that 61% of clients preferred a hybrid model. So, CTC will be implementing a hybrid model in September 2021.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Surveying and focus groups has enabled us to respond in real time to client needs and concerns, especially during the pandemic. We were able to identify people in financial and housing crisis to provide resources and emergency aid. It has allowed for an open door to discuss and address needs that people were embarrassed to talk about.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

CAREER TRANSITIONS CENTER OF CHICAGO
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CAREER TRANSITIONS CENTER OF CHICAGO

Board of directors
as of 6/24/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Larry Krema

Allegis Partners

Term: 2020 - 2022

Jay Schweiger

BMO Harris Bank

Ronaldo Borger

Faegre Baker Daniels LLP

James Baldwin

The Haymarket Center

Tanya Earley

Jones Lange LaSalle

Andrea Keller

Latham & Watkins LLP

Larry Krema

Allegis Partners

Myk Snider

Sphere PR Group

Shelly Green

USG Corp

Bernadette Patton

Shields Meneley Partners

Shelly Green

USG Corp

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/24/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/16/2019

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.