ASSOCIATION FOR A MORE JUST SOCIETY -U S

For a more just society

aka ASJ, ASJ-US   |   Grand Rapids, MI   |  www.asj-us.org

Mission

We strive to be brave Christians, dedicated to doing justice in Honduras and to inspiring others around the world to seek justice in their own contexts. To do this, we: Collaborate with, learn from, and advocate alongside our partner organization ASJ-Honduras to promote peace, justice, and the transformation of society and government in Honduras. Share our experience in Honduras with communities of justice seekers in order to learn together and advance best practices in justice work worldwide. Challenge and inspire Christians to live out the Biblical call to do justice and to effect change in their own communities.

Ruling year info

2001

Executive Director

Mrs. Jill Stoltzfus

Main address

PO Box 888631

Grand Rapids, MI 49588 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

AJS

EIN

36-4380344

NTEE code info

International Human Rights (Q70)

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Two-thirds of Hondurans live in poverty, a symptom of deep, structural inequalities and injustices. Two issues preventing the flourishing of people in Honduras are violence and corruption. We work to reverse these issues, helping strengthen government systems so that they work to promote peace, and transparency. Honduras is one of the world's most violent countries, with a homicide rate of nearly 60 per 100,000 in 2016 – 10 times the global average. This is due to a drug trafficking, the presence of multinational gangs, and rampant impunity in the country – for every 100 murders in Honduras, only six will result in a conviction. Through auditing, training, and advocacy, we work to build up the capacities of public officials and hold them accountable, enabling them to combat violence in the country. In addition, we educate individuals and churches across the US about what it means to do justice, challenging them to spread the example of Honduras through their own communities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Honduras Programs

Support programs in Honduras in the areas of violence, corruption, education, land rights, health, security and youth and family.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Share our experience in Honduras with communities of justice seekers in order to learn together and advance best practices in justice work worldwide.
Challenge and inspire Christians to live out the Biblical call to do justice and to effect change in their own communities.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of public institutions evaluated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We evaluate public institutions in Honduras that touch the lives of the poor – ranging from the Ministry of Education to the agency in charge of COVID-19 emergency purchases.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

By combatting violence and corruption in Honduras, our vision is that the Honduran government system works and is just for the most vulnerable and marginalized in Honduran society. Through many projects around two major themes (peace and transparency), we use auditing, investigation, legal intervention, journalism, and youth and community development to reach that goal.
Weak government systems are vulnerable to corruption, which drastically affects the daily lives of the poor. Public schools, public hospitals, and public infrastructure all suffer from mismanagement, theft of resources, and lack of accountability, meaning millions of Hondurans do not have adequate access to health, education, and other important elements of well-being. We work to identify and raise public awareness about corruption and weaknesses in these essential government systems and call on government leaders to make a change. We also offer technical support and expertise in the implementation of structural improvements to help essential government systems work to do justice.
In the United States, our goal is that everyone, but particularly Christians, accept the call to do justice both locally and globally. We use education and partnerships to promote holistic views of justice, encouraging people to go beyond short-term charity projects to support far-reaching structural transformation. We also advocate in Washington D.C. around topics in U.S. policy that are relevant to Honduran peace and justice.

Through investigations and systems of management monitoring, including regular detailed audits, we work to strengthen state institutions in Honduras. Prioritizing scientific, statistically-based information, we identify institutional weaknesses and cooperate with government leaders to create practical, measurable plans for improvement.
We also work with communities, civil society, churches, universities, and the private sector to create networks of active and engaged citizens, trained in their rights and empowered to hold the government accountable and to be brave christians.
We publish investigations, reports, and stories to spread awareness about this work in Honduras, in the United States, and throughout the English- and Spanish-speaking world.

Our four full-time staff members in the United States collaborate with over 130 employees of our sister organization in Honduras to respond to the needs of Honduras in innovative, adaptive, and impactful ways. Our donors recognize our ability to astutely identify the root cause of injustice, collaborate with government leaders and civil society allies to develop a plan for improvement, and persevere in the oversight of the plan's implementation until measureable improvements are seen.

Our unique and responsive methodologies have been recognized by Transparency International, the United Nations World Health Program, the U.S. State Department, and many other organizations, and mentioned in the New York Times, Foreign Policy magazine, and other publications of note.

In 17 years, we have seen measureable and lasting change in Honduras particularly in our four target communities. As impunity has dropped in these communities, so have homicides, and they have become safer places to live. Not only that, community members are empowered to be social auditors of their local schools and health centers, improving standards of attention. Each year, hundreds of children participate in violence prevention clubs and hundreds of teachers and parents receive trainings on how to prevent violence and child abuse.
On a national scale, we have successfully introduced topics to the national agenda, prompting dramatic response. Our revelation of overvalued and nonfunctioning medicines being purchased by the state resulted in the fall of the director of the medicine warehouse and a vice-president of Congress. Our insistence on a fundamental reform of the National Police has resulted in a top-down purge that removed over 4,000 officers suspected of links to gangs and drug trafficking. We have introduced important reforms to the legal system, including improved witness protection, more transparent case management, and a rewritten Organic Law of the National Police.
As we raise public awareness about issues of corruption and weak governance, we are observing a growing insistence among the population that this corruption is not acceptable, and a growing commitment to fight against it. In particular, our work with youth organizations and networks leaves us hopeful for Honduras' next generation, that united the country can stand firm against the specters of violence and abuse of power and make the country a safe and productive place for all members of society.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

ASSOCIATION FOR A MORE JUST SOCIETY -U S
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ASSOCIATION FOR A MORE JUST SOCIETY -U S

Board of directors
as of 3/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Scott Johnson


Board co-chair

Mr. Russ Jacobs

Sharon Baker

Byron Center Christian School

Russ Jacobs

Starbucks Corporation

Scott Johnson

Oklahoma State University

Kelli Schutte

William Jewell College

Steve DeHaan

Jensen & DeHaan

Kim Lodewyk

Heritage Professional Associates

Maureen Hodge

Vilma Balmaceda

Professor at Nyack College

Mark Veenstra

Mike Goorhouse

James Nealon

Paul DeBoer

Luis Flores

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/20/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data