Disease, Disorders, Medical Disciplines

Brain Injury Association of Michigan, Inc.

  • Brighton, MI
  • www.biami.org

Mission Statement

MISSION

To improve the lives of those affected by brain injury and to reduce the incidence and impact of brain injury through education, advocacy, support, treatment services, and research.

VISION

Everyone affected by brain injury will have immediate and equal access to services and support to lead a full and meaningful life.

Main Programs

  1. Education
  2. Support
  3. Advocacy
Service Areas

Self-reported

Michigan

State of Michigan

ruling year

1985

President

Self-reported

Mr. Michael F. Dabbs

Keywords

Self-reported

brain injury, head injury, prevention, education, rehabilitation, aneurism, brain tumor, coma, support, underserved population, advocacy, veterans, youth, children, sports concussion, athletes, coaches, parents, TBI, ABI, traumatic brain injury, acquired brain injury, support group

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Also Known As

BIAMI

EIN

38-2357475

 Number

6322300157

Physical Address

7305 Grand River Suite 100

Brighton, MI 48114 7379

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Brain Disorders (G48)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (E01)

Counseling Support Groups (F60)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The BIAMI's educational conferences and webinars, along with the corresponding CEU credits awarded to professionals that attend, help ensure the continuing eminence of Michigan's brain injury rehabilitation network, which is nationally regarded as a center of excellence in its field. The rehabilitation centers, programs and professionals that comprise this network are represented by the BIAMI, and rank #1 nationally in both the number of CARF (Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities)-accredited facilities, and the number of ACBIS-certified brain injury specialists.

With a robust I & R Center, a Veterans Program and 20 chapters and support groups across the state, the BIAMI has been serving Michigan's brain injury civilian and military survivor community on a daily basis, providing needed assistance, guidance and a ray hope for thousands seeking physical and emotional support since 1981.

It is our mission to help provide on behalf of ALL brain injury survivors - currently estimated at approximately 200,000 individuals - with immediate and equal access to Michigan's exemplary network of rehabilitative care.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Education

The Brain Injury Association of Michigan (BIAMI) offers specific certification programs, conferences and webinars throughout the year that focus on educating communities and professionals about all aspects of brain injury.

The BIAMI Annual Fall Conference, held each September, is the largest brain injury conference in the North America. The two-day event draws over 1,500 people and features leading experts from around the globe presenting the latest information on brain injury treatment, therapies, research findings and best-practice techniques. Over 145 exhibitors showcase and sell their products and services during both days of the conference, and professionals get an opportunity to meet and network with their colleagues in all disciplines related to brain injury. Moreover, for families and people with brain injuries, the Annual Conference is a wonderful opportunity to meet with others facing similar issues, gain valuable treatment and therapy information, and to meet potential service providers. 

The BIAMI also conducts a Legal Conference each May. This one-day conference focuses on the complex legal issues facing
a brain-injured client and provides information on the protection and resources offered by the legal system. Case managers, health care professionals, social workers, attorneys, insurance adjusters, psychologists, nurses, counselors, discharge planners, survivors, family members and caregivers all benefit from the information obtained.

In November, the BIAMI conducts its annual Survivor Conference, which focuses on quality of life issues for
survivors of brain injury, their family members and caregivers. While the information is targeted exclusively for this audience, Continuing Education Unit credits (CEUs) are offered for brain injury rehabilitation professionals, who are also encouraged to attend.

The BIAMI offers monthly webinars, which provide information and resources and facilitate online discussion on a variety of topics related to brain injury.

The BIAMI also serves as a primary program administrator for the Academy of Certified Brain Injury Specialists' (ACBIS) National Certification Program for both entry-level staff and experienced professionals working in brain injury services. The program provides staff and professionals the opportunity to learn important information about brain injury, to demonstrate their learning in a written examination, and to earn a nationally recognized credential. Through this program, the state of Michigan currently boasts the largest number of certified brain injury specialists in the nation.

Educational opportunities for survivors, family members and caregivers are also extended on a grassroots level via presentations given by members of the professional rehabilitative community at monthly meetings of the BIAMI's 20 chapters and support groups across the state.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Adults

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Budget

$420,000.00

Program 2

Support

After a brain injury, issues may arise in returning to school or work; changing family relationships; and with behavioral, emotional and financial concerns. Our Information & Resource (I & R) Center (http://www.biami.org/brain-injury-information-michigan.htm) associates speak to thousands of brain injury survivors, family members and caregivers, providing them with the best available information about brain injury; its effects on the family; physical, cognitive, behavioral and emotional changes on the individual; child or adolescent injuries; and specialized services. All are provided along with practical suggestions for living with a brain injury.

Additionally, our I & R Center proactively reaches out to various mental health agencies, ethnic groups, faith-based communities, disadvantaged groups and community support programs across the state, creating greater brain injury awareness and establishing the BIAMI as a trusted and confidential source for assistance and support.

The BIAMI also helps administer 20 chapters and support groups across the state that work directly with brain injury survivors, their families and caregivers on a grassroots level. Chapter and support group leaders - many of whom are also brain injury survivors - conduct monthly meetings in their respective communities and provide educational information; practical strategies for living on a daily basis; and social interaction opportunities within each community.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

Adults

Female Children and Youth (infants - 19 years)

Aging/Elderly/Senior Citizens

Budget

$75,000.00

Program 3

Advocacy

The Brain Injury Association of Michigan monitors and maintains a presence with the state and federal government in conjunction with the Brain Injury Association of America. We promote policies and legislation that prevent brain injury and enhance the care, services, and support available to brain injury survivors and their families. We ensure state and federal officials are kept aware of brain injury issues. BIAMI also helps survivors learn how to self advocate for the services and support they need.
Every year, BIAMI helps bring brain injury survivors, their family members, care providers, and professionals of various backgrounds together with their state legislators in Lansing. This event, Capitol Day, allows constituents who are affected by brain injury or work with brain injury survivors to discuss the policy issues with lawmakers.

Category

Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy

Population(s) Served

General Public/Unspecified

Disabled, General or Disability Unspecified

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    I. Programs & Services — Promote early and equal access to care for the brain injury communities

    II. Public Policy — Lead in addressing legislative threats and opportunities impacting our brain injury communities

    III. Marketing and Public Relations — Broaden BIAMI’s spectrum of brand awareness and identity

    IV. Collaboration — Create a management system to expand high quality partnerships with organizations for mutual benefit

    V. Sustainability — Ensure long-term sustainability by optimizing human and financial resources
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    I. PROGRAMS AND SERVICES:
    a) Conduct needs analysis to identify and prioritize the needs of brain injury communities.
    b) Determine current and new programs required to meet needs, as defined in needs analysis.
    c) Develop ongoing program evaluation process to ensure programs are high quality and meet the needs over time.
    d) Strengthen the effectiveness of local chapters and support groups.

    II. PUBLIC POLICY:
    a) Protect Auto No-Fault Insurance System in Michigan
    b) Advocate for Michigan Brain Injury Act
    c) Advocate for access to care, primarily Brain Injury Medicaid Waiver
    d) Advocate for state-of-the-art care guidelines: trauma care, post-acute treatment guidelines, and inclusion of TBI rehabilitation in worker compensation plans.
    e) Advocate for adoption of mandatory motorcycle helmet legislation
    f) Monitor all State and Federal Court decisions

    III. MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS:
    a) Develop integrated marketing plan aligned to positively impact the Association's mission, vision and goals with measurable outcomes.
    b) Reach out to stakeholders with periodic communications and media summaries that emphasize our value and contributions to the communities we serve.

    IV. COLLABORATION:
    a) Identify, assess, and categorize/prioritize potential collaborators: corporate, community/grassroots, associations, media, government, universities/schools, hospitals/providers, others.
    b) Strengthen relationships with current collaborators.
    c) Pursue collaborative efforts with new collaborators.

    V. SUSTAINABILITY:
    a) Determine staffing needs to support programs
    b) Evaluate increased use of qualified volunteers, including improved volunteer management program.
    c) Establish effective staff and critical volunteer training programs.
    d) Establish President and key leadership succession plan.
    e) Determine long term funding requirements for programs and services.
    f) Broaden and diversify philanthropic funding sources.
    g) Investigate increasing breadth and depth of grant funding assistance.
    h) Evaluate and optimize existing fundraisers.
    i) Develop three-year financial plan that includes building a reserve.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    The following resources provide us with the added capabilities needed to execute our plan:

    I. PROGRAMS & SERVICES:
    a) Michigan Brain Injury Provider Council
    b) BIAMI Executive Board - Program Subcommittee
    c) Twenty statewide chapter and support group leaders

    II. PUBLIC POLICY:
    a) Coalition Protecting Auto No Fault (CPAN) messaging
    b) CAPWIZ, an online legislative advocacy platform featuring mass letter-writing capabilities targeted towards state legislators.
    c) Social media platforms
    d) Grassroots volunteer support from brain injury constituency
    e) Effective public/media relations campaign in collaboration with CPAN

    III. MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS:
    a) Outside research firm and advertising agency
    b) Internal pr capabilities
    c) Internal social media capabilities
    d) Internship assistance
    e)
    f) Annual Awareness and Identity survey

    IV. COLLABORATION:
    a) State and national industry partners (i.e., MBIPC, MPHI, BIAA, CDC, etc.)

    V. SUSTAINABILITY:
    a) MI Nonprofit Association Salary & Wage Guideline
    b) Volunteer management systems available from NEW Center, BIAA StarSite, MI Nonprofit Association
    c) Other BIAA state affiliates.
    d) GuideStar Benchmark Survey
    e) MI Council of Foundations
    f) Association of Fundraising Professionals
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    The following performance indicators have been established as our key metrics in measuring success:

    I. PROGRAMS & SERVICES:
    a) Number of people impacted by our support programs:
    1. Number of call-in contacts with survivors
    2. Number of support group meeting attendees
    3. Number of attendees at social activities
    b) Number of registered attendees at all events and conferences
    c) Number of (and dollars raised through) sponsors at all events and conferences

    II. PUBLIC POLICY:
    a) Favorable media interest
    b) Factual media coverage
    c) Number of engaged advocates (CAPWIZ letters written, Capitol Day attendees, legislative hearing attendees)
    d) Number of legislative opportunities ( legislative hearings, testimony)
    f) Favorable legislative outcomes/decisions

    III. MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS:
    a) Increase in number of individual and corporate members
    b) Increase in donor contributions and sponsorships
    c) Increase in awareness and identity metrics derived from annual survey.

    IV. COLLABORATION:
    a) Number of total collaborative partnerships
    b) Number of new collaborative partnerships gained

    V. SUSTAINABILITY:
    a) Revenue - adherence to plan/forecast
    b) Expenses - adherence to plan/forecast
    c) Net income - adherence to plan/forecast
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    The following numbers indicate our progress to date towards our 2014 goals:

    I. PROGRAMS & SERVICES:
    a) Number of call-in contacts with survivors - 861
    b) Number of meeting attendees - 1,499
    c) Number of attendees at social activities - 2,255
    d) Total number of conference attendees - 2,230
    e) Total number of exhibitor sponsors - 178

    II. PUBLIC POLICY:
    a) Media interest/coverage - 9 stories featuring or mentioning the BIAMI
    b) CAPWIZ activity - 2,900 letters written to legislators
    c) Capitol Day - 190 attendees contacting/meeting with 100% of the state legislature
    d) Legislative Hearings - 6 senior representatives attended Senate Public Policy Committee approval of the MI Brain Injury Act.
    e) Successful (to date) in gaining favorable legislative support in maintaining MI No-Fault System as is; MI Brain Injury Act expected to be approved by House.

    III. MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS:
    a) Individual Memberships - 685; Corporate Memberships - 125
    b) Number of sponsors - 82
    c) Sponsorship Revenues - $546k
    d) Awareness and Identity Survey to be administered end of year

    IV. COLLABORATION:
    a) Total Partnerships - 33
    b) New Partnerships - 8

    V. SUSTAINABILITY:
    a) Revenues to date - $1.185M
    b) Expenses to date - $1.176M
    c) Net Rev. to date - $9.271K
Service Areas

Self-reported

Michigan

State of Michigan

Social Media

Affiliations + Memberships

Affiliate/Chapter of National Organization (i.e. Girl Scouts of the USA, American Red Cross, etc.) - Affiliate/chapter

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

BRAIN INJURY ASSOCIATION OF MICHIGAN INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Brain Injury Association of Michigan, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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President

Mr. Michael F. Dabbs

BIO

Michael (Mike) Dabbs has been president of the Brain Injury Association of Michigan since 1994. The Association is a statewide non-profit organization with 20 chapters and support groups that provides support, education and advocacy for persons with brain injuries and their families, as well as promoting research and providing prevention information. It is also the chartered state affiliate of the Brain Injury Association of America.

In addition to his role as president, Mr. Dabbs also holds a number of related committee, board and advisory positions with various head injury prevention and treatment organizations in Michigan, including the State of Michigan Department of Community Health; the Detroit Medical Center's Southeastern Michigan Traumatic Brain Injury System Advisory Council; the Michigan Brain Injury Providers Council; and the Michigan Council on Injury Control; and the Washtenaw County Health Organization. He is also co-editor of the Michigan Resource Guide For Persons With Traumatic Brain Injury and Their Families.

Mr. Dabbs has been a life-long resident of Ann Arbor, and is actively involved in the community as a member of the Kiwanis Club of Ann Arbor.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Kevin Arnold

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
Race & Ethnicity
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Diversity Strategies
No
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
Yes
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity