Michigan Disability Rights Coalition

Feisty and Non-compliant

aka MDRC   |   East Lansing, MI   |  www.mymdrc.org

Mission

MDRC cultivates disability pride and strengthens the disability movement by recognizing disability as a natural and beautiful part of human diversity while collaborating to dismantle all forms of oppression.

Our Vision- MDRC envisions a world where people with disabilities:
• Live full lives within the community with equal rights, equity and opportunities.
• Are valued as essential and vital members of the community.
• Can be their full selves, in all their identities, in all aspects of their lives
• Have space for self-discovery, to cultivate community, and to develop pride.

Notes from the nonprofit

Feel free to contact us if you would like to support us and any of our specific programs.

Ruling year info

1985

Executive Director

Mrs. Theresa Metzmaker

Main address

3498 East Lake Lansing Road Suite 100

East Lansing, MI 48823 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Michigan Council of Independent Living Programs

EIN

38-2435517

NTEE code info

Disabled Persons' Rights (R23)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Ending the oppression of people with disabilities and all of their identities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Assistive Technology

Michigan Assistive Technology Program
The Michigan Assistive Technology Program (MATP) is a program for people with disabilities, by people with disabilities.

This program provides people with disabilities, community members, family members and businesses trainings, demos and loans of assistive technology.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities

Her Power works directly with teen girls with disabilities through a unique, four-day event designed to promote critical thinking about society’s messages, eliminate shame, develop leadership skills and encourage self-acceptance. This event is built on the best practices of the disability justice community and emerging research in female development, and goes beyond self-esteem programming to provide a venue for real self-empowerment.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
People with disabilities

Provide trainings on a variety of topics relating to leadership development, disability pride, inclusion, and more.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Ethnic and racial groups

Conduct educational sessions for people with dual eligibility for Medicare and Medicaid to learn about their options for a demo program designed to improve the health of older adults and people with disabilities.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Economically disadvantaged people

Partners Against Violence and Injustice in Michigan (PAVIM) project partners represent organizations that provide statewide leadership in the areas of domestic and sexual violence, disability advocacy, and anti-oppression work. This group came together to improve the accessibility and responsiveness of organizations and service providers for people with developmental disabilities who have experienced domestic violence or sexual assault.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Victims and oppressed people

The LEAD program provides communities of color with increased access to disability education and resources to account for the significance of institutionalized oppression and white supremacy on their outcomes.
Strategic Priorities
- Build the efficacy and capacity of MDRC to be a leader in the development and implementation of work to dismantle institutionalized white supremacy and cultivate a culture of equitable transformation for the sector.
- Cultivate and strengthen individuals, through relationship-based activity and topic-based workshops, to serve as advocates for themselves and others.
- Enhance the visibility of people of color in disability rhetoric, training, and storytelling.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status
People with disabilities
Refugees and displaced people

Where we work

Awards

Community Partner Award 2017

The Firecracker Foundation

Affiliations & memberships

Society for Human Resource Management 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of training workshops

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Seniors, Economically disadvantaged people, People with disabilities, At-risk youth, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Education and Outreach for MHL

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

A number of individuals viewed training virtually.

Number of phone calls/inquiries

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with hearing impairments, People with physical disabilities, People with vision impairments

Related Program

Assistive Technology

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Calls on how to access and acquire Assistive Technology to support people with disabilities to be able to function as desired

Number of customers reporting satisfaction with program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, People with intellectual disabilities, People with learning disabilities

Related Program

Leadership

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

People with disabilities and family members who participate in our programs report satisfaction with program activity.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Participation:
The right of free participation in all that affects the community interest.

Customer Driven:

The best use of resources available for supports is the free choice of what is needed by the customer. Forcing people to receive services that are not needed, because of bureaucratic requirements, teaches people that they are dependent and that they must "game" the system to get what they need. The best way to assure efficient use of supports is to focus on the use of supports for full citizenship, instead of trying to build bullet-proof entitlements.

Grass Roots Initiative:

People with disabilities must organize locally to achieve full citizenship in their chosen communities. Facilitated skill-building, at the direction of local groups, can support effective grass roots advocacy; but, ultimately, people with disabilities must take responsibility for their own futures.

Economic Self-sufficiency:

The best support for the disability community in achieving full citizenship is the creation of personal and community economic self-sufficiency. Disability benefits are not an adequate substitute.

Technology as Tool:

Michigan's disability community must seize technology as a critical tool in its fight for full inclusion. The Internet and other collaborative strategies must be a key part of our common struggle. We must lead this effort, not wait for the rest of society to deem our technology issues a priority.

"Nothing about me, without me."

Build the economic and political capacity of local groups to effectively participate in communities of choice and issues advocacy .
Create a state-wide collaborative technology infrastructure to foster long term communication between local disability groups.
Sponsor events and activities that promote sharing of best practice, collaborative planning, and the building of consensus around policy impact goals.
Find and develop economic and political resources, independent of the existing government and funding sources, that can be allocated according to the plans of Michigan's disability community, instead of bureaucratic priorities.
Mold a staff team, with a long term commitment to Michigan's disability community as a customer base—a team capable of working anywhere in the state, focusing on the uncertain and rapidly evolving disability policy future, and using collaborative technologies to supplement face-to-face networking.
Forge a partnership between board, staff and constituents for strategic development and strategic priorities.

While carrying out these projects, MDRC developed several capacities and areas of expertise :
Building meaningful partnerships with a variety of diverse organizations
Managing staff and interns working from virtual offices around the state
Flexibility and creativity
Adult and active learning style facilitation
Public policy advocacy
Linking existing projects to achieve maximum outcomes
Valuing interdependence

Informed Communities: Hosted forums around the state bringing up-to-date information on public policy issues to people with developmental disabilities and their families. Forum attendees also received training and technical assistance in developing an action plan to influence the policy issue in their community.

Connections for Community Leadership: Supported emerging leaders with disabilities through trainings, curriculum development, and peer-learning activities. Additionally, CCL provided funding to leadership development initiatives around the state and worked with both generic and disability-specific organizations to improve effective facilitation of leadership development in Michigan.

Proud of Myself: Assisted Iosco RICC members with developing a sense of disability identity and pride through a variety of interactive educational sessions. Participants shared what they learned with their Community Mental Health agency and with their local community at the annual Fourth of the July parade.

Her Power, Her Pride, Her Voice: A retreat for high school girls with disabilities that explores what it means to be a teen girl with a disability in today's world. Interactive art-based activities are used to help the girls learn from each other and teach the world how they see themselves. A large focus of this retreat is on disability identity, history, pride, and self-determination.

Including Our Neighbors: Provides training for community organizations around the state regarding inclusion and self-determination for people with disabilities, including people with high and complex support needs. MDRC provides support, technical assistance and distribution of funds to various local community-building initiatives for both people with and without disabilities.

Grassroots Organizing Workshops (GROW): Provided technical assistance to several sites around the state in community building and asset mapping. This included helping local teams of people with disabilities and non-traditional community partners working together to meet community needs.

Many Faces, One Voice: Taught people with disabilities to produce digital stories using free software and assisted them in using the stories for advocacy.

Other Programs Include:
Reforming Michigan's Long-Term Care System
Connections for Community Leadership
Finding Our Way Home: Statewide Housing Advocacy for People with Disabilities
Building Bridges with the LGBT community
Building Your Financial Future
ATXchange
Michigan AT Loan Fund
Partners Against Violence in Michigan

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Michigan Disability Rights Coalition
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Michigan Disability Rights Coalition

Board of directors
as of 04/29/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sarah Slocum

Altarum

Term: 2020 - 2024

Sarah Slocum

Altarum Institute Center for Eldercar and Advanced Illness (CECAI)

Christopher Wardell

Community Economic Development Association of Michigan

Alan Hejl

Dalia Smith

Lucia Rios

Yuself Seegars

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/29/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability