PLATINUM2023

VICTIM ASSISTANCE PROGRAM INC

aka Victim Assistance Program   |   Akron, OH   |  www.victimassistanceprogram.org

Mission

We empower our community to restore lives impacted by crisis, violence, and tragedy.

Ruling year info

1994

President & CEO

Mrs. Leanne Graham

Main address

137 South Main Street, Suite 300

Akron, OH 44308 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

38-3142753

NTEE code info

Victims' Services (P62)

Hot Line, Crisis Intervention (F40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to FBI Uniform Crime Reports and the Ohio Attorney General's Domestic Violence Report (2019), there is one new victim of crime every 27 minutes in the Summit County community and surrounding areas. This equates to thousands of crime victims who must overcome the life altering effects of victimization. These crimes affect victims emotionally, financially, physically and/or spiritually on various levels.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Crisis Intervention

Crisis intervention is provided both in person and through our crisis hotline, online chat, and text feature 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Advocates assess the caller’s safety, provide crisis intervention, and empower the victim to develop a safety plan and a plan of action based on their individual needs. Advocates will also provide victims' rights education and information about community resources.

Direct service staff are trained in the National Organization for Victimization's (NOVA) model of crisis intervention. In using this best practice model, advocates address the victim's safety and security, allow the victim to vent and tell their story, validate their emotions, and predict potential issues in an effort to prepare the victim for what they can expect for the future.

Population(s) Served
Adults

After addressing a victim’s acute crisis in person or via hotline, advocates follow up with victims within 24 to 48 hours to check in, reassess safety, and offer additional services. Advocates offer to meet with victims at home, in a VAP office, or any other location where the victim feels safe and comfortable. By providing follow up services to victims after an immediate crisis, advocates empower clients to establish a plan of action (also known as a case plan) to assist victims in addressing the impact trauma has, or may have, on their life or their families’ lives which may include referring clients to agencies outside of our scope of service. If criminal charges are filed, advocates will walk alongside victims through all phases of the criminal justice process, from the initial arraignment hearing to case disposition.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Victim Assistance Program provides ongoing education to staff, volunteers, interns, and community professionals through our own Summit Victim Assistance Academy. The Academy currently offers 1 in-house course, The Essentials, which is the only nationally approved, comprehensive online and in-person training of its kind offered in the state. This 44-hour hybrid training course promotes a standardization of services and fulfills the training requirements to become a Comprehensive National Credentialed Advocate through the National Organization for Victim Assistance. Other community participants have attended The Essentials, including police, fire, dispatch, and staff from the prosecutor's office and corrections.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Vicitm Services Award of Excellence 1989

Court of Claims of Ohio

Vicitm Services Award of Excellence 1991

Court of Claims of Ohio

Interfaith Award 1997

Akron Area Interfaith Council

Outstanding Victim Service Award 1995

Akron Police Department

Tadini Bacialupi Program of Distinction Award 2017

National Organization for Victim Assistance

Affiliations & memberships

National Organization of Victim Assistance Program 1974

Ohio Crisis Response Team 2018

National Crisis Response Team 2018

Ohio Victim Witness Association 2017

Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Adolescents, Children, Preteens

Related Program

Crisis Intervention

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The number of men, women and children served during the calendar year are unduplicated individuals.

Number of phone calls/inquiries

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Crisis Intervention

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our tracking system only includes victims calling our hotline or online chat during business and non business hours. These numbers are duplicated. We do not track administrative calls.

Total number of volunteer hours contributed to the organization

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Advocacy

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of donated hours from volunteers and interns. Management's estimate of the hourly fair value of these services is $15 per hour.

Number of duplicate services provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Crisis Intervention

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of services provided to all individuals served during the calendar year.

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Number of donors who donated in 2022 but not in previous years. We utilize Little Green Light (CRM) to monitor donor engagement and gifts.

Number of staff members certified in subject area training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Adolescents, Children, Preteens

Related Program

Crisis Intervention

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Direct service staff are credentialed through the National Advocate Credentialing Program (NACP.)

Number of customers reporting satisfaction with program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Crisis Intervention

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

An anonymous client survey is at the culmination of services. In 2022, 98% of the 87 surveys completed agreed that clients felt listened to and respected by program staff and volunteers.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Each year, Victim Assistance Program responds to hundreds of on-scene crises, answers thousands of 24-hour hotline calls, and helps over 4,500 (2021) survivors navigate the aftermath of their victimization. We serve those impacted by diverse crimes, violence, and trauma, providing all of our services FREE of charge and without discrimination.

The overall goal of our services is to lessen the impact of crime and trauma upon the victim and address the emotional aftermath of their victimization. As a result of our services, we anticipate that victims will have an increased understanding of their rights as a victim of crime as well as the options and choices available to them, and that our program will assist with addressing their immediate needs.

Our services are available 24/7/365 in person, through our crisis hotline and online chat, and on-scene. Victim advocates respond to the scene upon request from law enforcement and are strategically placed throughout Summit County to assist walk in clients. All of our victim services adhere to best-practice models outlined by our accreditation with the Council on Accreditation (COA).

Advocates utilize the National Organization for Victim Assistance’s (NOVA) trauma-informed model of crisis intervention. The NOVA model encourages advocates to address the victim’s safety and security, allows the victim to vent and tell their story, validates their emotions, and predicts potential issues to prepare the victim for what they can expect for the future. By using the best practice NOVA model, VAP can provide comprehensive, trauma informed services to victims of any crime or trauma. To meet the ongoing training needs for those providing services, VAP created the Summit Victim Assistance Academy in 2014 to provide consistent best practice techniques to ensure victims receiving assistance are receiving the best service possible.

Victim Assistance advocates are strategically placed throughout Summit County, Ohio. They are stationed in the Akron Police Department, Akron Municipal Court, Barberton Municipal Court, Stow Municipal Court and at our main office at 137 S. Main Street in Akron. In order for Victim Assistance Program to respond twenty-four hours a day. Advocates are often called directly to the crime scene; however, advocates also meet victims at local hospitals, the Medical Examiner's Office, and schools throughout Summit County. Providing immediate services at the crime scene allows victims to begin regaining the control that was lost as a result of their victimization. Each advocate's use of the National Organization for Victim Assistance's (NOVA) best practice model of crisis intervention aids in prioritizing victims' concerns while providing viable solutions that make sense for each individual victim's need and circumstance.

The NOVA model encourages advocates to address the victim's safety and security, allows the victim to vent and tell their story, validates their emotions, and predicts potential issues in an effort to prepare the victim for what they can expect for the future. Successful implementation of this model allows the advocate to normalize the victims' emotions, empower the victim to make decisions on their own, and assess their basic needs such as clothing, food and shelter. Without our services, victims are often left with minimal support and resources that would otherwise assist in regaining a sense of normalcy and stability in the days, weeks, and months following the incident.

Our organization remains committed to serving ALL survivors of ALL types of crime, violence, and trauma. In 2020, amidst pressing racial justice issues facing our nation and our community, VAP embarked on a year-long process of improving the agency's approaches to diversity, equity, and inclusion. We contracted with an outside organization to complete a full, in-depth analysis of our agency's policies, relationships, and culture. The resulting suggestions of this contractor were woven in to the fabric of our 3-year strategic plan and remain the primary goal of the agency over the immediate future.

As a result, our staff are receiving fresh training in areas such as civil courage, cultural competence, unique considerations for underserved victim populations, and more. Additionally, our staff leadership is receiving trainings on trauma-informed supervision, and our Board of Directors is receiving training on equity in service and cultural competence. We are excited to continue carrying out this plan and improving our agency's understanding of and ability to serve minority and underserved populations who are experiencing violence and crime at disproportionately higher rates.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

VICTIM ASSISTANCE PROGRAM INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

VICTIM ASSISTANCE PROGRAM INC

Board of directors
as of 11/24/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Paul Levy

The University of Akron

Term: 2022 - 2024

Marie Brilmyer

Cohen & Company

Nancy Carst

Akron Children's Hospital

Paul Frey

Edward Jones

Gary Guenther

Summit County Medical Examiner's Office

Nicole Hagy

Akron Municipal Court

Thom Mandel

Rubber City Radio Group

Bill McCarron

Huntington Bank

Jay Mellon

AtNetPlus

Patrick A. Palmieri, PhD

Summa Health

Thomas Smoot

Summit County Emergency Management Agency

Brian Thomas

United Disability Services

Jennifer LaFleur

Famous Supply

Brian Harding

Akron Police Dept.

Rebekah Chapman

First Energy

Arkeyia Walker

Entrepreneur

Stacy Kovacs

Cleveland Clinic Akron General

Megan Raber

City of Tallmadge

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/16/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/24/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.