Wildlife in Need Center

Connecting People and Wildlife through Rehabilitation, Education and Research since 1994

aka WINC   |   Oconomowoc, WI   |  www.helpingwildlife.org

Mission

To provide wildlife rehabilitation to Wisconsin wildlife with the intent to release back to their native habitat, conduct research designed to further the positive impact of rehabilitation, and provide quality community education programs and services.

Ruling year info

1994

Executive Director

Kim Banach

Main address

W349 S1480 S. Waterville Road, Suite B

Oconomowoc, WI 53066 USA

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EIN

39-1773974

NTEE code info

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Environmental Education and Outdoor Survival Programs (C60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Wildlife Rehabilitation

Wildlife rehabilitation is the treatment and care of injured, diseased, or orphaned indigenous wildlife and the subsequent return of healthy viable animals to appropriate habitats in the wild. WINC accepts all species of wildlife (except skunks), annually treating up to 3,000 animals per year of up to 140 species.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Education plays a critical role in fostering harmonious relationships between people and wildlife.

The Wildlife In Need Center offers a variety of education programs (many featuring live animals) to schools and other groups of all ages in an ongoing effort to encourage understanding and appreciation of our native wildlife.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Wildlife In Need Center (WINC), remains true to its mission of connecting people and wildlife through rehabilitation, education and research. WINC shares knowledge by educating over 45,000 people per year on the importance of respecting and caring for the future of our wildlife friends. WINC aims to become a nationally recognized wildlife rehabilitation center that serves as a hub for other satellite facilities and is financially stable. WINC will work in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin-Waukesha and the University of Wisconsin Colleges and Extensions, forming partnerships that will aid in gaining WINC recognition as the top resource in the community that promotes an ethic of care and respect for the natural world.

To become a nationally recognized Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, trust with the public is key. Our goal is ensure that each citizen that comes to our center and entrusts us with an injured or orphaned animal(s) knows that each animal is left in extremely capable hands. In addition to admissions, our staff and trained volunteers field approximately 10,000 phone calls annually, each providing expert advice about wildlife in need, wildlife nuisance issues, etc. WINC's ever-growing education program, utilizing WINC's 15 educational animal ambassadors coupled with media presentations including television appearances, shares knowledge about Wisconsin wildlife and the positive influence we all can have on our wildlife neighbors.

WINC also works frequently with other local rehabilitators and humane societies, sharing knowledge and experience, as well as offering our facilities to them for cases in which they are not able to care for or house particular wildlife. Along with partnerships with other animal-welfare societies, WINC constantly works towards bettering our relationships with Wisconsin higher education facilities. This past year, 2017, marked our seventh year in partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Waukesha, on whose field station land WINC is located. Our flagship summer internship program also allows college students who attend universities across Wisconsin and other states a rare opportunity to do hands-on rehabilitation work with Wisconsin wildlife, often for course credit.

Finally, to become financially stable, WINC's development team aims to meet the ever-growing needs of the Center. Fundraising efforts - focused on membership, private donations, foundations, grants, events, and education programs - allow WINC to operate 365 days a year without the burden of a mortgage.

Since its inauguration in 1994, the need for wildlife rehabilitation in southeastern Wisconsin, as well as the spread of WINC's mission, is evident in the growth that our organization has achieved. During 2011, WINC moved from a small one-bedroom house to an efficient and spacious 6,000 square-foot facility. This facility, built with our patients in mind, features aquatic indoor rehabilitation rooms, ponds in outdoor enclosures, and flight cages. Our larger facility increases opportunities for staff to perform research to further the field of wildlife rehabilitation and enables WINC to offer more education, including on-site programs and displays.

In 2015, WINC launched a new user friendly website, with information on animal emergencies, events, education programs, and current news and events regarding wildlife.

WINC staff and volunteers carry out WINC's mission. The volunteers donate over 24,000 hours annually. Three advanced licensed rehabilitators staff and a wildlife rehabilitator staff, WINC and have a combined experience of 42+ years caring for Wisconsin wildlife. Through their expertise and the dedication of the volunteers, combined with strong relationships with local veterinarians, each animal that comes through our doors receives professional and knowledgeable care.

In addition to fundraising and receiving over $40,000 in-kind donations in 2016, WINC receives a discount from our veterinarian partners, ensuring the best medical care for our wildlife patients.

WINC has accomplished so much in the 23 years since its inauguration. In 2016, WINC admissions increased 25%, admissions exceeded 3,100 animals under the care of 6.5 FTEs and supported by more than 22,000 volunteer hours. In 2016, WINC delivered 16% additional programs; the education team delivered 150 programs, reaching over 45,000 Wisconsin neighbors. Through even the toughest of economic times, WINC has provided free medical care to over 52,000 animals since opening.

Over the next few years, WINC plans to partner with the University of Wisconsin Colleges and Extensions while bolstering its relationship with the University of Wisconsin-Waukesha. Visiting our facility during April of 2015 is the Board of Regents, representing the entire University of Wisconsin System. We know that this visit will stimulate interest in partnering with WINC in the future. Since moving into its new building, WINC strives to operate as efficiently as possible for our staff and wildlife patients. As such, we have not been able to accomplish as much research as desired, though we have high hopes for projects in the near future.

Financials

Wildlife in Need Center
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Wildlife in Need Center

Board of directors
as of 07/12/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Thomas Demers

Lynn Wilde

Dean Pipito

Bridgett Brown

Gottlieb John Marmet

Thomas DeMers

Holly Schlenvogt

Heather Merewood

John Rupke

Lou Banach

Mike Guznizcak

Tom Roberts

Jennifer Bloss DVM

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/12/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data