Youth Development

Girl Scouts of Minnesota and Wisconsin River Valleys

  • Saint Paul, MN
  • www.girlscoutsrv.org

Mission Statement

Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place.

The Girl Scout Promise and Law are how we as Girl Scout members agree to act toward each other and the world.

The Girl Scout Promise
On my honor, I will try:
To serve God* and my country,
To help people at all times,
And to live by the Girl Scout Law.

The Girl Scout Law
I will do my best to be
honest and fair,
friendly and helpful,
considerate and caring,
courageous and strong, and
responsible for what I say and do,
and to
respect myself and others,
respect authority,
use resources wisely,
make the world a better place, and
be a sister to every Girl Scout.

*Members may substitute for the word God in accordance with their own spiritual beliefs.

Main Programs

  1. Girl Scout Leadership Experience
  2. Girl Scouts ConnectZ
  3. Outdoor Program
  4. Girl Scouts STEM
Service Areas

Self-reported

Minnesota

Girl Scouts River Valleys serves 49 counties that span Minnesota (44), Wisconsin (4), and Iowa (1). Generally, we serve southern Minnesota and western Wisconsin.

ruling year

1945

Chief Executive Officer since 2015

Self-reported

Tisha Bolger

Keywords

Self-reported

Girls, Inclusiveness, leadership, women, financial literacy, STEM, civic participation, community

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2015, 2015 and 2014.
Register now

Also Known As

Girl Scouts River Valleys

EIN

41-0693910

 Number

1157812196

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Girl Scouts (O42)

Leadership Development (W70)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Girl Scouts' mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. When girls participate in Girl Scouts, they benefit in 5 important ways:

1. Girls have confidence in themselves and their abilities, and form positive identities.
2. Girls act ethically, honestly, and responsibly, and show concern for others.
3. Girls take appropriate risks, try things even if they might fail, and learn from mistakes.
4. Girls develop and maintain healthy relationships by communicating their feelings
directly and resolving conflicts constructively.
5. Girls desire to contribute to the world in purposeful and meaningful ways, learn how to identify problems in the community, and create “action plans" to solve them.

When girls exhibit these attitudes and skills, they become responsible, productive, caring, and engaged citizens. Studies show that the development of attitudes, behaviors, and skills like confidence, conflict resolution, and problem solving are critical to well-being and rival academic and technical skills in their capacity to predict long-term positive life outcomes.

Long term, youth who develop these five outcomes:
-are happier, healthier, and less likely to engage in problem behaviors or be victimized;
-achieve more academically and feel more engaged in school;
-become strong job applicants; and
-become successful, well-adjusted adults.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Girl Scout Leadership Experience

Not available

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Females, all ages or age unspecified

Budget

Program 2

Girl Scouts ConnectZ

In 2011, Girl Scouts River Valleys created Girl Scouts ConnectZ to engage girls in diverse and low-income communities – girls who often lack access to high-quality, out-of-school time opportunities. This culturally-responsive leadership program is designed to address underrepresented girls’ specific needs. Through partnerships with nearly 100 schools and community organizations, we help over 2,700 girls in the Twin Cities and southern Minnesota learn, grow, and build skills for a successful future.

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Females, all ages or age unspecified

Budget

Program 3

Outdoor Program

Backed by more than 100 years of experience, Girl Scout camps provide a unique opportunity for girls to build independence, develop social skills, and explore new interests. Camp is a place for girls to grow, explore, and have fun. At camp, girls learn the value of cooperation and team building as they gain the confidence and skills they need to grow into healthy young women.

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Females, all ages or age unspecified

Budget

Program 4

Girl Scouts STEM

Not available

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Females, all ages or age unspecified

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Girl Scouting builds girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. Our goals are to help girls develop their potential through these five outcomes:

    -Strong Sense of Self: Girls have confidence in themselves and their abilities, and form positive identities.

    -Positive Values: Girls act ethically, honestly, and responsibly, and show concern for others.

    -Challenge Seeking: Girls learn to take appropriate risks, try new things even if they might fail, and learn from mistakes.

    -Community Problem Solving: Girls desire to contribute to the world in purposeful and meaningful ways, learn how to identify problems in the community, and create "action plans" to solve them.

    -Healthy Relationships: Girls develop and maintain healthy relationships be communicating directly and resolving conflicts constructively.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Girl Scouts creates opportunities for girls to dream big and develop skills for a better future. As Girl Scouts, girls enjoy a supportive environment within a network of friends, where they can feel confident while learning and exploring. Through accessible, flexible programming, girls in grades K-12 learn how to:

    -Apply Science + Math Skills
    -Live a Healthy + Creative Life
    -Be a Good Citizen
    -Handle Money + Plan for the Future
    -Be Kind to Nature
    -Be a Good Leader

    HOW GIRLS PARTICIPATE
    Girl Scouts River Valleys offers a flexible participation model within each of these focus areas that accommodates girls' differing interests and needs. This model includes traditional Girl Scout troops, as well as experiential learning events, subject-focused series like Robotics, camp, swim team, travel, and special initiatives designed to reach girls in diverse and low-income communities. No matter what girls do in Girl Scouting, they engage in three processes that make Girl Scouting unique from other activities: girl leadership, experiential learning, and cooperative learning.

    OUR COMMITMENT TO EVERY GIRL
    All girls need opportunities to explore new skills, develop healthy relationships, and practice decision-making and leadership. Every year, we work hard to remove the barriers that make it difficult for girls to participate in Girl Scouts. At a time when many families in our community are facing financial challenges – 38 percent of students in Minnesota receive free or reduced-price lunch – no girl is ever turned away for an inability to pay.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    HISTORY
    Girl Scouts began over 100 years ago with one woman, Girl Scouts' founder Juliette Gordon Low, who believed in the power of every girl. The initial gathering of 12 girls has grown into a global movement to help modern girls discover their passions and talents. With more than 3 million Girl Scouts in 94 countries and 59 million alumnae, we are united across distance and decades by friendships, shared adventures, and the desire to do big things to make the world a better place.

    We work on a broader scale and our girls navigate a more complex world than ever before, but some things remain the same. For more than a century, we have provided girls with more ways to learn and lead than any other organization and our reach is incomparable. We are urban, suburban, and rural. We are socioeconomically diverse. We are inclusive of all racial and ethnic groups. We reach virtually every residential zip code in America. We serve girls in schools, churches, temples, mosques, foster homes, and public housing. Even with our vast reach, we remain true to our founder's vision of providing all girls the opportunity to realize their potential.

    "The very mission of Girl Scouts is to encourage girls to serve, to stand up, and to take their place besides a long line of American heroes: ordinary citizens…expecting that they can change their communities and their country." - Condoleezza Rice, first female African American secretary of state

    ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE
    While affiliated with our national organization, Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA), through a council charter, Girl Scouts River Valleys is one of 112 councils in the U.S. acting as a self-sufficient non-profit with our own 501(c)3 determination. River Valleys has the 12th largest girl membership in the nation and is often recognized amongst other councils for our innovative programs, resources, and systems. We operate independently with unique programs and initiatives to serve local girls. This independence allows us to nimbly respond to the needs of our communities and today's girls.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    River Valleys is proud to provide an outcomes-driven leadership experience for girls. Our responsive delivery model keeps our program relevant to today's girls. We pride ourselves on being in line with the latest youth development research. In 2000, GSUSA founded the Girl Scout Research Institute (GSRI) whose purpose is to continuously measure the impact of the Girl Scout program.

    In 2015, GSUSA and GSRI embarked on an in-depth review of program outcomes. Through close partnerships with youth developmental experts, other youth-serving organizations, and research institutes like the Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development at Tufts University, GSRI revised and updated the Girl Scout program outcomes and measures. Close collaboration helped us ensure that we are truly and meaningfully gauging the most critical aspects of Girl Scout activities to ensure we are always delivering on our mission.

    Councils nationwide are adopting revised outcomes and the accompanying measures beginning in FY17. We are grateful for the GSUSA investment in research that allows us to continue to deliver the premier leadership development program for today's girls.

    Our five leadership program outcomes are effective measures of the true impact of our program on girls. When a girl participates in Girl Scouts, she develops these outcomes:

    -Strong Sense of Self
    -Positive Values
    -Challenge Seeking
    -Community Problem Solving
    -Healthy Relationships

    We measure annual progress toward these leadership program outcomes, as well as the Girl Scout processes (girl leadership, hands-on learning, and cooperative learning) through the Council-Wide Girl Survey, a survey administered to a representative sample of girls in grades 4-12 each year that includes both quantitative and qualitative measures. We also conduct a specific evaluation of various programs and events, including Girl Scouts STEM and camp. Through these evaluations, River Valleys measures program outcomes, as well as several specific indicators and influencers of academic success. Much of our program aligns with the Minnesota Academic Standards and Benchmarks in Arts, English, Physical Education, and Social Studies.

    River Valleys also collects data related to member experience and satisfaction and membership trends. Analysis of this data helps us identify opportunities, inform decisions and priorities, and deploy resources for the best rreturn on investment. This information helps us analyze and improve on our programming year over year so we can continue to deliver valuable experiences that girls want and that we know work.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Each year, River Valleys nurtures girl leaders, with consistently favorable results. Our Girl Scouts are active learners - 98% say they are eager to do well in school and other activities. They are team builders and friends - 9 in 10 girls say that in Girl Scouts, they learn by working with others. They are also confident explorers – 9 in 10 girls report that they like to try new things, even if they are difficult at first.

    Last year, River Valleys Girl Scouts provided over 187,500 hours of direct service by taking action in their communities. This contribution represents over $4.1 million in girl-led projects with lasting results in our region.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Minnesota

Girl Scouts River Valleys serves 49 counties that span Minnesota (44), Wisconsin (4), and Iowa (1). Generally, we serve southern Minnesota and western Wisconsin.

Social Media

Blog

Accreditations

American Camping Association (ACA) - Accreditation

Affiliations + Memberships

United Way Member Agency

Minnesota Council of Nonprofits

Videos

photos








External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

GIRL SCOUTS OF MN AND WI RIVER VALLEYS INC
Fiscal year: Oct 01-Sep 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

Sign In or Create Account to view Revenue and Expenses information

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2015 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Girl Scouts of Minnesota and Wisconsin River Valleys

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2015 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Chief Executive Officer

Tisha Bolger

BIO

Tisha has more than sixteen years experience as a senior executive with Girl Scouts; most recently as River Valley's Chief Operating Officer since 2007. Tish previously served in key leadership roles with the legacy Greater Minneapolis and St. Croix Valley Girl Scout councils where she was involved in every aspect of the business.

In her role as CEO, Tisha provides vision and leadership to ensure that Girl Scouting thrives and girls unlock their full potential. During her 25-year career, Tisha has also served in leadership positions with the Amherst H. Wilder Foundation in St. Paul and Alpha House Youth Services in Wisconsin. She is currently Board Chair for the American Camp Association, a national association dedicated to youth development and quality camp programs. Tisha's passion for all youth to reach their full potential extends through her work with other agencies that focus on youth development. Tisha also served as a board member and President of Teen Wise, formerly named Minnesota Organization on Adolescent Pregnancy, Prevention and Parenting (MOAPPP), and Face to Face Health and Counseling Services, Inc.

Tisha holds a Master's degree in recreation and outdoor education from the University of Minnesota, and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Carroll College in Helena, Montana.

STATEMENT FROM THE Chief Executive Officer

"Girl Scouts has a bright future that is reflected in River Valleys' year-end numbers, our programming and in our vigorous approach to bringing Girl Scouts to girls who lack leadership opportunities. River Valley's is a strong council with a focus on bringing Girl Scouting to all girls in our 49-county region.

As we look forward to this momentous year, we are excited by the possibilities and are firm in our resolve to offer girls the relevant, balanced and leadership-building experiences they need to grow into strong women.

None of this would be possible without the support and dedication of our members, volunteers, benefactors and community partners. On behalf of the entire River Valleys' organization, thank you for choosing to be champions of girls.

Yours in Girl Scouting,
Michele Azar, Board Chair
Tish Bolger, Chief Executive Officer"

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Michele Azar

Best Buy Co., Inc.

Term: Jan 2016 - Jan 2018

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.
Race & Ethnicity
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Diversity Strategies
No
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
Yes
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity
Diversity notes from the nonprofit
River Valleys is committed to creating an environment that promotes the understanding of, and an appreciation for, the value of diversity within the organization and its members, staff, and partners.