Youth Development

Big Brothers-Big Sisters of Central Minnesota, Inc.

  • St. Cloud, MN
  • www.bbbscentralmn.org

Mission Statement

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Minnesota serves children by providing one-to-one professionally supported mentoring relationships.

Service Areas

Self-reported

Minnesota

The central Minnesota counties of Stearns, Benton, Sherburne, Morrison, and the northern tier of Wright County.

ruling year

1975

Executive Director

Self-reported

Ms. Jackie Johnson

Keywords

Self-reported

youth mentoring professionally supported volunteering

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013.
Register now

Also Known As

BBBS-CM

EIN

41-0972056

 Number

6506460516

Physical Address

203 Cooper Avenue North, Suite 162

St. Cloud, MN 56303

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

Community, Neighborhood Development, Improvement (S20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

Our mission is to provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported 1-to-1 relationships that change their lives for the better, forever. Our caring volunteers nurture children through positive life experiences that will assist the children in becoming self-confident individuals and productive community members. By matching children in our service area who need and want a caring and professionally trained mentor/friend, we can impact their lives forever.

National research has shown that positive relationships between “Littles” and their “Bigs” have a direct and measurable impact on children's lives.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Community-Based Mentoring is the traditional mentoring option, core service, and foundation of Big Brothers Big Sisters? service to children at risk. In the CB program, a Big Brother, Big Sister, Big Couple, Big Family, or Big Grandparent spends an average of four-hours per week with a youth involving them in their life and experiences. The School-Based Mentoring program partners with schools to assist them in service to at-risk youth through adult/child mentoring. The Site Based program services school-age at-risk youth residing within a specific and targeted community or neighborhood. Site-Based program relationships are limited to interaction utilizing a central and public location within that community or neighborhood such as a community center.

Category

Population(s) Served

Budget

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    That all children achieve success in life.
    We develop positive relationships that have a direct and lasting effect on the lives of young people.
    We partner with parents/guardians, volunteers and others in the community and hold ourselves accountable for each child in our program achieving:
    1. Higher aspirations, greater confidence, and better relationships
    2. Avoidance of risky behaviors
    3. Educational success
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    We provide service to over 600 children each year, and target youth that need us most including those living in single parent homes, growing up in poverty (65% of the children we served last year were from households below 200% of federal poverty guidelines) and coping with parental incarceration. In addition, many of the children in our program have a developmental disability, mental health diagnosis, and/or struggle academically or socially.

    Big Brothers Big Sisters makes meaningful, monitored matches between volunteers (“Bigs”) and children (“Littles”), ages 5 through 18. We develop positive relationships that have a direct and lasting effect on the lives of young people.

    Mentoring programs include the community-based Big Brother, Big Sister, Big Couple or Big Family program; the school-based program where a Big Brother or Big Sister interacts with a child within the school environment; and the site-based program where a Big Brother or Big Sister meets with a child in a particular site location (i.e. Boys & Girls Club) for 1 to 2 hours per week.

  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Our Executive Director has over 30 years of experience in human services, is a Cultural Competency trainer, has lead public policy, implemented creative program design, and participated on local, state, and national associations. Her vita includes with high-risk youth, families of alcoholics, pregnant teens, mentally ill adults, and youth with special needs.

    Our Program Director has over 15 years with our agency and completed BBBS Program Certification on September 7, 2010. She effectively leads program performance, operational effectiveness, strategic program direction, and partnership development in support of services for youth. She and two other program staff continue to use their training from The Foundation of Cultural Competency through Big Brothers Big Sisters of America.

    Our program team consists of eight full-time staff with professional degrees in the field of social services (Human Services, Criminal Justice, Sociology, Psychology, and Social Work) who maintain close, consistent communication with the child, the child's family, the child's mentor, and the child's school in order to foster the well-being and success of each child we serve.

    Each match is assigned to a Match Support Coordinator who provides advice, guidance, and encouragement throughout the course of the relationship. Our Match Support Coordinators communicate with each child, mentor, and parent/guardian on their caseload each month to ensure child safety and match effectiveness.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    The Service Delivery System (SDS) developed by Big Brothers Big Sisters of America and implemented by our agency helps to ensure high quality, effective programming.

    The Agency Information Management (AIM) system is a unique and proprietary database that allows us to track and evaluate relationships between the volunteers and children we serve. This national database measures service statistics and performance metrics as well as illustrating trends regarding the impact of our program.

    The Youth Outcome Survey (YOS) tracks changes in eight measures: social acceptance, scholastic competency, grades, educational expectations, attitudes toward risk, trust, truancy, and presence of a special adult/role model. An initial survey is administered to youth prior to being matched with a mentor and serves as a baseline. Once matched, children complete the YOS survey on an annual basis. This assessment indicates the child's progress in attaining identified goals and developing personal strengths, social skills, compensatory skills, healthy relationships, and positive behaviors.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Minnesota serves approximately 600 children per year and ensures that vulnerable youth in our community have the relationships, experiences, support and services they need to help them build trust, learn how to make and maintain friendships, grow their confidence, enhance their school performance, and help ensure that they graduate from high school and develop into healthy, productive adults.

    Youth that participate in mentoring relationships demonstrated the following benefits: improved school attendance and performance, increased graduation rates, higher lifetime earnings, reduced truancy, improved health outcomes (reduction in teen pregnancy, alcohol and drug use), reduced juvenile crime, reduced adult crime, reduced need for social services (Wilder Research, 2007).

    The Big Brothers Big Sisters Youth Outcomes Summary, released in 2012, substantiates that its mentoring programs have proven positive academic, social-emotional and behavior outcomes for youth, and is linked to long-term outcomes such as high school graduation, avoidance of juvenile delinquency, and college or job readiness.

    Social Return on Investment studies conducted by Wilder Research and the University of Minnesota found quality mentoring program to have a benefit-cost ratio of $2.72 resulting from reduced truancy/court costs, reduced high school dropout rates, and improved health outcomes.

    Mentoring helps to break the cycle of poverty be providing opportunities to children that help them develop into community assets rather than absorbing social costs.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Minnesota

The central Minnesota counties of Stearns, Benton, Sherburne, Morrison, and the northern tier of Wright County.

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

Match at-risk children with volunteer mentors Provide training and supervision for volunteer mentors in our program Help cover the cost of background screening/background checks of potential volunteer mentors

Affiliations + Memberships

Affiliate/Chapter of National Organization (i.e. Girl Scouts of the USA, American Red Cross, etc.) - Affiliate/chapter

Chamber of Commerce

External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

The review section is powered by Great Nonprofits

Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF CENTRAL MINNESOTA
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Get all this now for free
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Big Brothers-Big Sisters of Central Minnesota, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair, Board Co-Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
Need the ability to download nonprofit data and more advanced search options? Consider a Premium or Pro Search subscription.

Executive Director

Ms. Jackie Johnson

BIO

Over 25 years of experience working in nonprofits, with the last 18 years in programs where mentoring was a key to the agencies' success.   Some of Jackie's experience includes working with high-risk youth at a residential treatment facility, families of alcoholics, pregnant teens and children/youth with special needs. She has been trained by Rev. Dr. Wilson Goode (Amachi) as well as Ann Adalist-Estrin, both nationally respected leaders and trainers in working with mentoring children of incarcerated parents. Jackie recently completed a year-long leadership class.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr John Mahowald

Mahowald Insurance Inc.

Term: July 2009 -

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?