Youthcare

aka Youthcare/Camp Sunrise   |   Minneapolis, MN   |  www.youthcaremn.org

Mission

YouthCARE's mission is to promote respect for self and others, develop future leaders, and provide youth with positive multicultural activities and relationships with caring adults.

Ruling year info

1978

Executive Director

Dr. Willie Dean

Main address

2701 University Ave SE Ste 205

Minneapolis, MN 55414 USA

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Formerly known as

Camp Sunrise

EIN

41-1322470

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Employment Training (J22)

Intergroup/Race Relations (R30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Young Women's Mentoring Program

The Young Women’s Mentoring Program is a community-based multicultural youth mentoring and development program focused on building leadership, employment readiness, and life skills of girls and young women. The program provides 8 young women (Youth Mentors), 15-18 years old, with a 12-month leadership and employment experience and 100 girls, 7-12 years old, with regular out-of-school time activities. Youth Mentors receive meaningful and challenging jobs and become positive role models for the younger girls living in their same low-income public housing communities – Little Earth of United Tribes in Minneapolis and McDonough Community in St. Paul. The Styling Science component encourages girls and young women to actively discover and examine intellectual and academic concepts in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

Population(s) Served

Camp Sunrise, located an hour north of the Twin Cities on the St. Croix River, is a year-round outdoor education program focused on bringing together Twin Cities youth, 13-18 years old, from diverse ethnic, cultural, and racial backgrounds to live and work in an outdoor multicultural community. Over 300 urban youth per summer come to Camp Sunrise to build friendships across cultures and benefit from employment training, outdoor environmental education, and teambuilding. 12 youth are employed through the summer as Junior Counselors and Counselors in Training. During the school year, Camp Sunrise offers weekend camping trips and Safaris in the City, urban outdoor education activities such as ice skating, rock climbing, and biking.

Population(s) Served

YouthLEAD (Youth Leadership, Education, & Diversity) provides youth ages 13-18 with regular programming such as Homework Help, Teen Tech, and Arts & Culture activities. Those participating on the Youth Advisory Council plan events for their peers, recruit volunteers, and provide input in staff and board meetings. The Community Service Stars component of YouthLEAD employs youth part time to work at local nonprofit organizations while learning about community issues and personal finance. In these projects, youth continue to strengthen their relationships from camp with both peers and adults, providing a safe space for social and emotional development.

Population(s) Served

YouthCARE’s Multicultural Youth Employment Program (MYEP) is an integral part of all three primary programs. MYEP provides jobs through which youth identify their interests, strengths, and skills related to career development. MYEP also provides financial literacy workshops for teens employed in YouthCARE’s primary programs. Through MYEP, youth learn to make responsible and ambitious choices as self-sufficient young adults.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

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Awards

Eleanor P. Eells Award 1985

Fund for Advancement of Camping

Citation 1987

President Ronald Reagan's Citation Program for Private Sector Initiatives

Certificate of Appreciation for Contributions to Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway 1993

National Park Service

Anti-Racism Initiative 2000

Minnesota Council of Nonprofits

Support of Girls & Women 2002

Ann Bancroft Foundation

Certificate of Recognition 2002

Office of Minnesota Governor Jesse Ventura

Non-Profit Humanitarian Award 2003

Minneapolis Community & Technical College

Access to the Outdoors Award 2008

Parks & Trails Council of Minnesota

Community Ignition Award 2008

Minnesota MILE

Best Practices Award 2009

Governor's Council on Faith and Community Service Initiatives

Community Impact Award 2010

Women's Foundation of Minnesota

Minnesota Nonprofit Award for Excellence 2014

Minnesota Council of Nonprofits and MAP for Nonprofits

Affiliations & memberships

Community Shares 2014

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

1. Young people gain respect, understanding and appreciation for themselves and others
2. Young people develop leadership skills and have the opportunity to use them within YouthCARE and the broader community
3. Young people develop cultural competency skills needed to thrive in a multicultural community
4. Young people develop self-sufficiency, educational and employment readiness skills needed for successful transition from adolescence to adulthood
5. Young people develop connections to caring adults, peers and the broader community

While YouthCARE offers recreational and social outlets, the programs are designed to go beyond fun activities by working on multiple levels to identify the needs of young people. Cultural exchange and education activities in each program empower youth to feel pride in their culture, trust and respect themselves and others, and work toward greater cultural appreciation and racial equality. Youth are encouraged to create friendships that defy racial and ethnic stereotypes. By involving participants in projects that necessitate collaboration across cultures, they not only learn to work as a team with those who are different from themselves, but they also experience success in aiding their communities.

Young people employed in YouthCARE's Multicultural Youth Employment Program learn skills to become productive members of society as adults. The employment program works to create future leaders through hands-on training and engaging service-learning work. The employment responsibilities call upon youth to take pride in their work and claim ownership over their neighborhoods and communities. Ultimately, urban youth who are trained and employed through YouthCARE will be better prepared to enter a multicultural workplace and society.

Youth involved in the Youth Advisory Council (YAC) take on an even greater responsibility. Through their involvement in event planning and YouthCARE staff and board meetings, YAC members develop leadership, professional, and decision-making skills. YAC gives young people a voice in YouthCARE, allowing them deserved involvement in their own community.

A primary goal of all YouthCARE programs is to assist youth in making a successful transition from adolescence to adulthood. Participation in Camp Sunrise, YouthLEAD, and the Young Women's Mentoring Program fosters the development of responsible, thoughtful, and engaged youth. YouthCARE creates opportunities for young people to learn to be open-minded and socially conscious, confident in their own cultures, yet appreciative of the differences of their neighbors.

YouthCARE is governed by a diverse 27-member Board of Directors that meets bi-monthly to provide strategic, visionary, and on-going support to the organization. Each Board member serves on one of several policy committees, and many also serve as program or special events volunteers. In addition, youth participants attend Board meetings, providing insighe and reporting on the organization's youth leadership activities.

YouthCARE's regular paid adult staff consists of 13 full-time. We also employ 7-8 college work study students and interns from Macalester College and the University of Minnesota during the school year. YouthCARE employs a significant number of temporary full- and part-time adult staff during the summer at Camp Sunrise. Throughout the year, we employ 80 youth in our three primary programs. We consistently employ a multicultural staff that is trained to work together to make youth feel included, respected, and valued.

On an annual basis, YouthCARE has over 200 policy, program, and special events volunteers.

YouthCARE continued to have great success in helping youth reach our stated organizational goals. While youth participating may not focus on all of the goals all of the time, all three YouthCARE youth development programs work in different ways to achieve our goals. In the 2012-13 program year, we had a sample size of over 300 surveys and 95 observations to help tell our story. The results are exciting and proof that programming that focuses on developing young people outside of the classroom can, and at YouthCARE does, have a significant impact on their social and emotional development.

Goal 1: Young people gain respect, understanding and appreciation for themselves and others.
Outcome: As a result of participating in YouthCARE activities 338 youth reported the following:
•95% have made new friends in this program.
•90% learned how to get along with others.
•92% have done things that make me feel good about myself, in this program.

Goal 2: Young people develop leadership skills and have the opportunity to use them within YouthCARE and the broader community.
Outcome: As a result of participation in YouthCARE leadership activities 185 youth reported the following:
•91% increased their ability to place group goals above the things they want.
•96% increased their ability to help a group be successful.
•91% increased their ability to appreciate opinions that are different from their own.

Goal 3: Young people develop cultural competency skills needed to thrive in a multicultural community.
Outcome: As a result of participation in YouthCARE activities 338 youth reported the following:
•92% are comfortable meeting people who are different from themselves.
•94% respect the values and traditions of people from different racial, ethnic, or cultural groups.
•90% try to find something that they have in common when they meet people who are different from them.

Goal 4: Young people develop self-sufficiency, educational and employment readiness skills needed for successful transition from adolescence to adulthood.
Outcome: As a result of participating in YouthCARE activities youth reported or demonstrated:
•90% of youth (338) reported that what they do in the program will help them in their future.
•83 of 93 (89%) of youth employees successfully completed a job training program
•91% of youth who completed an employment training program demonstrated moderate to significant improvement as evidenced by supervisor observations.

Goal 5: Young people are connected to caring adults, peers and the broader community.
Outcome: As a result of participating in YouthCARE activities 338 youth reported the following:
•96% feel at least one staff in the program cares about them.
•88% have an adult from YouthCARE who they can talk to if they have a problem.
•91% (of 185 youth) increased their connection to the natural environment.

Financials

Youthcare
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Youthcare

Board of directors
as of 9/17/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Christine Ganzlin

YWCA of Minneapolis

Term: Jan 2016 - Dec 2011

Andrea Carroll-Glover Associate Director of Program Development

Rasmussen College

Christine Ganzlin Vice President for Girls & Youth

YWCA of Minneapolis

Stephanie Haddad Assistant Dean

University of Minnesota - Humphrey School of Public Affairs

Denise Johnson Director - Cardiopulmonary Services

University of Minnesota Medical Center and Masonic Children's Hospital

Bill Jones Director

Camp Lincoln/Camp Lake Hubert

Scott Maanum Senior Manager of Financial Advisory Services

Riveron Consulting

Chris Mortenson Teacher

Upper Mississippi Academy/Mortenson Construction

Jeff Proulx Senior Counsel

Target Corporation

Henry Rucker Housing & Financial Coaching Coordinator

Project for Pride in Living

Eliot Searls Regional Consultant

Ameriprise Financial

Hema Viswanathan Patent Counsel

Valspar Corporation

Stacey Braybrook Attorney

Mortenson Construction

Rashad Buckner Payer Operations Manager

Medtronic

Frank Downwind Youth Development Center

Little Earth of United Tribes

Danielle Ducre Rawls Corporate Attorney

Ditech Financial, LLC

Lisa Fulton Senior Intellectual Property Counsel

3M Innovative Properties Company

Melissa Kell Vice President

Catapult Marketing

Kathy Nguyen Asst. Vice President

Piper Jaffray & Co.

Eric Overman Senior Manager - Advisory Services

Ernst & Young LLP

Jason Quackenbush Director, Workforce Relations

Xcel Energy

Mary Rosen Senior Counsel, Capital Markets (International)

Wells Fargo

Kelsey Thorkelson Associate

Robins Kaplan LLP

Pepe Wonosikou Assistant Director, International Fellows and Scholars Program

University of Minnesota - Humphrey School of Public Affairs

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes