Educational Institutions

Junior Achievement of the Upper Midwest, Inc.

  • Maplewood, MN
  • www.jaum.org

Mission Statement

Our mission is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy. We teach students how to start businesses that create jobs. We teach entrepreneurial values that strengthen workplaces. We teach skills to generate wealth and manage it.

We believe in the boundless potential of young people. We share their passion for excellence, respect their talents and creativity, celebrate their honesty and integrity, harness their desire for collaboration, and create opportunities for hands-on learning.

Main Programs

  1. JA Traditional In-School Programs
  2. Junior Achievement's Experiential Learning Center
Service Areas

Self-reported

Minnesota

Junior Achievement of the Upper Midwest serves students in Minnesota, North Dakota and western Wisconsin. During the 2015-2016 school year, we reached more than 161,000 students with our experiential programs and partnered with more than 9,000 volunteers.

ruling year

1994

President & CEO

Self-reported

Gina P. Blayney

Keywords

Self-reported

education, business, enterprise

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EIN

41-1424988

 Number

4455585472

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

In collaboration with the education and business communities, Junior Achievement programs helps students make a connection between what they learn in school and how it can be applied in the real world - enhancing the relevance of their classroom learning and increasing their understanding of the value of staying in school. Every child who is better prepared for life becomes a stronger contributor to our communities, businesses, and economy. Our unique, experiential programs help prepare young people for the real world by showing them how to generate wealth and effectively manage it, equipping them with the skills needed to succeed in a career, and how to apply entrepreneurial thinking to the workplace and business creation.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

JA Traditional In-School Programs

Providing age-appropriate classroom curriculum that begins in elementary school. Student learn how they impact the world around them as individuals, workers, and consumers. Programming continues through middle and high school where we focus on key content areas of financial literacy, college and career readiness and entrepreneurship.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

$3,000,000.00

Program 2

Junior Achievement's Experiential Learning Center

Housing our Capstone programs (JA BizTown, JA Finance Park), JA's Experiential Learning Center impacts students through hands-on, relevant programming that helps them make a connection between what they learn in school and how it applies in the real world.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

2,060,000

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    Junior Achievement's vision is to create a generation of financially literate, workforce ready and entrepreneurial young people who are equipped with the skills needed to take on their futures with direction and enthusiasm.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Junior Achievement programs help prepare young people for the real world by showing them how to generate wealth and effectively manage it, how to create jobs which make their communities more robust, and how to apply entrepreneurial thinking to the workplace. Students put these lessons into action, and learn the value of contributing to their communities. JA's unique approach allows volunteers from the community to deliver our curriculum while sharing their experience and expertise with students. Our classroom volunteers transform the key concepts of our lessons into a message that inspires and empowers students to believe in themselves, demonstrating that today's young people can make a difference in the world.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Junior Achievement has strong partnerships with the business and education communities. Businesses recognize the importance of our programs, and how preparing students for future success will also benefit them by creating a workforce-ready generation. Educators value our programs because they correlate to the Minnesota K-12 Academic Standards for social studies and math for grades K-12 as well as the Common Core State Standards in English/ Language Arts. Educators also value that JA brings volunteers into the classrooms to share their personal and professional experiences with students. According to annual surveys, our volunteers report that JA volunteer opportunities are rewarding and impactful. According to the 2015-2016 survey, 97% of JA volunteers felt they made a difference in the lives of young people, 97% would recommend volunteering with Junior Achievement to friends or colleagues, and 94% indicated that they would volunteer with Junior Achievement again.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Each year, Junior Achievement of the Upper Midwest partners with the University of Minnesota's Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement (CAREI) to evaluate Junior Achievement programs delivered to students in our 3-state region. Studies showed that JAUM's efforts produced statistically significant improvements in students' understanding of the economy and society, and in students' character strengths. In addition to local results, JAUM measures outcomes based on an annual survey of Junior Achievement alumni conducted by JA USA.

    The results are impressive. After participating in JA Titan, students increased their knowledge of key economic concepts from 52.9% to 86.2%. Participation in JA Titan also increased students' interest in starting their own business (from 23.1% to 29.6%).

    Students who participated in JA Finance Park made statistically significant gains in their understanding of personal finance when compared to a similar group of students who did not participate in the program. Students also made significant improvements in important attitudes, such as their willingness to save for the future and their aspirations for success in post-secondary education.

    Students participating in JA Job Shadow significantly increased their understanding of the skills needed to secure and succeed in a good job in today's economy. The average percent correct on pre and post-tests of these key concepts increased from 59.9% to 71.8%. A majority of students (88.9%) improved their understanding of how their education is connected to the quality of the lives they will lead as adults.

    Junior Achievement students are better prepared to succeed now and in the future. JA alumni are 30% more likely to have a 4-year degree and 67% more likely to have a graduate degree than the general U.S. population. 88% of JA alumni are satisfied with their careers compared to 48.7% of the general public. When asked what impact JA has had on their lives, 30% of JA alumni say it helped them learn to better manage their money, and 90% of JA alumni are confident in their ability to manage money.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Not available.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Minnesota

Junior Achievement of the Upper Midwest serves students in Minnesota, North Dakota and western Wisconsin. During the 2015-2016 school year, we reached more than 161,000 students with our experiential programs and partnered with more than 9,000 volunteers.

External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT OF THE UPPER MIDWEST
Fiscal year: Jul 01-Jun 30
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Junior Achievement of the Upper Midwest, Inc.

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2014 and 2013
  • Board Chair
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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President & CEO

Gina P. Blayney

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Craig A. Gordon

RBC Correspondent & Advisor Services

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?