Diversity Council

Rochester, MN   |  www.diversitycouncil.org

Mission

We create equitable and inclusive communities where all individuals are empowered, conscientious, and courageous.

Notes from the nonprofit

All of our work is grounded in current research and theory as well as best practices in our field. Thirty years of experience and a reputation for excellence have established us one of Minnesota’s leaders in diversity and equity. The world is changing. We are building a spirit of equity at the heart of that transformation.

Ruling year info

1992

Principal Officer

Dee Sabol

Main address

1130-1/2 7th St NW, Suite 204

Rochester, MN 55901 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

41-1709139

NTEE code info

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (O01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

EquityLogic™

EquityLogic™ professional training and consultation equips leaders and their employees from all sectors with knowledge and tools to thrive in diverse environments. Our business is preparing the workplace for a burgeoning and brilliantly complex workforce.

Population(s) Served

B2U trainings are interactive scenario-based sessions that prepare participants for real life encounters. Unlike traditional diversity training, these activity-based workshops focus on tactical interventions.

B2U includes: general instruction on bias interruption, courageous listening exercises, and culturally-specific insights and role play with tips and tools for effective de-escalation, respectful intervention, and social accountability.

Group exercises provide opportunities fro individuals to work through incidents with peer coaching and continual dialog, building a repertoire of actionable responses.

Population(s) Served

StandUp Students, a program of the Diversity Council, provides interactive scenario-based training that prepares students for real-life encounters. These workshops for students grades 5-12 offer tools and tactics to interrupt bias and hate as it occurs, in safe and age-appropriate ways that help build environments where all students feel welcome. The trainings are fun and engaging and reinforce the values and principles taught in our schools.

StandUp Students provides opportunities for young learners to work through incidents together, with peer coaching and response. The skills developed in these workshops continue to grow through practice at school and beyond.

Population(s) Served

enCounter Poverty Southeastern Minnesota (enCP) is a community-based response to poverty that includes collaborative visioning (exploring service gaps and redundancies, improving communications and access, maximizing funding potential), cooperative data management, and the development of educational tools that expose individuals to the challenges of poverty in ways that build empathy and lead to action.

This initiative is based on the “all ships rise” analogy: in this seascape Olmsted County is the largest vessel, but it is most successful when every vessel of every size is seaworthy and anchored with the fleet. This informed how the group determined its geographic scope, realizing that addressing poverty in all segments of the region – urban, rural, small town – improves our collective future.

Population(s) Served

Pathways to Equity is designed and implemented by marginalized populations with the support of collaborative resources from throughout southeastern Minnesota to build integrated social navigation and civic participation solutions at the community level. It establishes, compensates, trains, and nurtures liaisons and navigators within underrepresented populations who are charged with forming enduring relationships and increasing cultural understanding with and among service providers and civic structures.

Population(s) Served

Ally Basic Training and Ally Bootcamps are participatory scenario-based sessions that provide opportunities for individuals to learn about and practice responses to incidents they might encounter in the workplace and in their daily lives. Unlike traditional diversity training, these activity-based workshops focus on real-time interventions. The sessions include general instruction in courageous listening and observing, as well as culturally-specific insights and roll-playing exercises with tips and tactics for de-escalation, respectful intervention, and accountability.
A&A Basic Training and Bootcamps are part classroom instruction and part interactive roll play. Presentation and discussion segments include: implications of unconscious bias on personal response, crowd behavior and bystander theories, compassionate listening model, pyramid of hate in the current sociopolitical climate, courageous observing. Interactive elements include: recognizing personal safety, establishing situational understanding, gauging climate/energy level of situations, and responding with courage. They are designed for congregations, civic groups, and associations.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

Seal of Approval 2016

Charity Reviews Council

Affiliations & memberships

Regional Social Justice Coalition 2019

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Diversity Council has four strategic goals that guide our work:

Global
An equitable and inclusive community, where all individuals are empowered, conscientious, and courageous.

Civic Equity
Civic equity is the realization of a society where all individuals receive equitable access to resources, protections, and opportunities. Each person enjoys: (a) equal treatment under law, both through law enforcement and the judicial system; (b) equitable access to and representation in the political process; and (c) equal opportunity to engage in the design of and benefit from inclusive public policy.

Educational Equity
Educational equity exists when all individuals are fully prepared for the roles of their choice, regardless of personal or social circumstances. Educational equity requires systems of support that result in full access to opportunities that lead to personal growth.

Health Equity
Health equity is the attainment of the highest level of wellbeing for all individuals, regardless of personal or social determinants of health. Health equity requires the social, economic, and environmental conditions that result in full access to opportunities that lead to healthy lives.

The Diversity Council is a catalyst and convener, creating environments that allow every person the opportunity to reach their full potential. In our work we transform organizations, empower youth to act as change makers, equip and mobilize nontraditional leaders, and galvanize equity work in the region. We measure success in terms of progress, not by prescribing what changes should occur, but by compelling strategic and effective action on key issues affecting individuals, groups, and communities.

The Diversity Council concentrates its work in three areas: civic equity, health equity, and educational equity. We accomplish this by:
• Identifying and publicizing issues and opportunities through outreach, print, and online resources;
• Brokering action by facilitating dialogue and convening collaborative workgroups;
• Operating programs that create leaders who can not only be successful in the current system, but can also change the system.
• Educating youth and adults through trainings, consultations, and arts and cultural events.

All of our work is grounded in current research and theory as well as best practices in the field. Twenty-seven years of experience and a reputation for excellence have established us as the premier diversity and equity resource in Southeast Minnesota.

As one of the early leaders in diversity education, The Diversity Council draws from a long history in our field to inform our work. Decades of experience give us a broad knowledge of what has been effective in the past and what has not. Other assets that position us for success include a sound financial footing; positive, long-standing relationships with leaders across all sectors of the community; established partnerships with schools and other organizations; and favorable relationships with media. Although we have a small staff, their many years of experience in the field are also a major contributing factor to our success.

Our program consistently meet our goal of 80% of participants demonstrating direct outcomes. Occasionally certain workshops dip below the 80% mark, and those workshops are revised until the goal is met. Most workshops exceed the goal. Qualitative analysis also demonstrates progress toward intermediate goals.

A continually changing environment and rapidly shifting demographics mean that new challenges constantly arise and our work is never done. Although prejudice will never disappear entirely, the Diversity Council will continue to serve as a guide for our community to help meet the challenges of change and integrate the assets of new populations into the fabric of our society.

Financials

Diversity Council
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Diversity Council

Board of directors
as of 04/29/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

James Rechs

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes