JAPAN AMERICA SOCIETY OF IOWA

aka JASI   |   Des Moines, IA   |  www.japaniowa.org

Mission

MISSION The Japan America Society of Iowa (JASI) is a non-profit, volunteer based organization that seeks to establish mutual understanding between Japanese and American communities in Iowa. JASI provides opportunities to its members and the public to participate in social, cultural, and educational activities.

Ruling year info

2003

Executive President

Chie Schiller

Executive Vice President

John Hurst

Main address

PO Box 12093

Des Moines, IA 50312 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

41-2061569

NTEE code info

Cultural, Ethnic Awareness (A23)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

our funding sources are currently limited to membership dues and occasional donations. The organization is based on volunteer participation by members, and this leads to a challenge of limited resources in multiple areas such as but not limited to administrative needs, event/program management, and communication. The organization holds numerous physical assets such as a tea house, tea ceremony supplies and equipment, taiko drums, donated Japanese artifacts, merchandise for fundraising, and cooking supplies and equipment. There is a risk of potential loss or damage to these assets due to the organization not having a centralized location to store and protect them. The Board also identified that there is a lack of community outreach, and better coordination needed to reestablish cultural presentations/meetings for public education purposes.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Manabiya Iowa

It’s founded in 2012, Manabiya Iowa is the first and only K-12th Japanese language school to serve central Iowa children. Based in a donated space in West Des Moines, Manabiya Iowa meets 3 hours weekly for 9 months of the year for a total of 114 classroom contact hours in Japanese language and cultural instruction. The mission of the school is to provide a supportive learning environment for children to develop a global mindset and respect for differences through intensive, immersive language and cultural instruction.

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

JASI’s community taiko drumming group. Ensemble taiko drumming, or kumi-daiko, originated in 1951 with Daihachi Oguchi, a Jazz musician. He wondered why the ancient taiko drums found in temples and at festivals throughout Japan were never played together like a western drum set. He started arranging the different traditional drums and music and kumi-daiko was born. Kumi-Daiko is now an art form that is played around the world, even throughout the Midwest. Soten Taiko is Iowa’s only taiko performance group, founded in 2011. They provide music and education about taiko at schools, private functions, and festivals throughout central Iowa. Soten Taiko currently has six active members, and is open to anyone who would like to learn, regardless of prior musical or percussion experience.

Population(s) Served
Adults

This is a one day, free to the public event focusing on Anime and other Japanese pop culture interests such as cosplay. Running for more than 6 years our last event had over 1,000 attendees from throughout the state of Iowa and the midwest. The event is family friendly for all ages giving young and old a chance to learn, create friendships with individuals of similar interests, and connect with resources throughout the community.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults

This committee started as a Tea House restoration project team. The Tea House was originally owned by Tomoko Yamamoto in California during World War II. She and many other Japanese in the U.S. were facing the real possibility of being sent to internment camps, so to ensure her tea house would be safe she arranged to have it sent to Fae Huttenlocher’s house in Des Moines. It was re-discovered after the floods of 1993 and in the past few years this committee has raised money to restore it. The restoration project was completed in 2015, and we’re now searching for a permanent home possibly at the Iowa Capitol grounds or at the Des Moines Botanical Garden.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

• To promote Japanese culture and language through fun, intellectual, and meaningful events and meetings
• To support Japanese community members and the local population interested in Japan
• To establish solid relationship with other diverse organizations in our community
• To nurture the stable relationship between Japan and the U.S. at both the personal and official levels

JASI provides community outreach events to demonstrate Taiko (Japanese traditional drum), Calligraphy, Tea ceremony, Kimono (Japanese traditional costume) and other Japanese cultural activities at local schools and other Iowa community organizations or companies.

Japan America Society of Iowa envisions peace and friendship between Japan and Greater Des Moines community. Encompassing a 2000 year history, Japan still stands strong for images of its elegance and strengths. There are many different forms of cultural symbolism other than the Mount Fuji, geisha, and samurai in Japan, and it is our goal to provide education to Greater Des Moines community and establish mutual understanding of our respective cultures.

We're currently planning on a 2-year project. This project aims to promote the understanding of Japan within the State of Iowa, especially towards underserved areas with non-traditional audiences that have not yet been exposed previously to Japanese culture and topics, and to foster networks and capacity building to support U.S.-Japan exchange and outreach with corroborations with other local nonprofits organizations and businesses. To do this, 1) Japan America Society of Iowa (JAS Iowa) to hire a full-time executive director, 2) create a strong foundation in order to support the JAS Iowa by provide educational conferences to Board Members. 3) engage local communities such as universities, local nonprofits and local businesses to develop program to encourage interest in Japanese culture, language and U.S.-Japan exchange.

Japan America Society of Iowa has existed in the Greater Des Moines community for 30 years (established 1989); the organization’s members are knowledgeable and have much experience related to Japanese culture, language, music and art. The members have a passion for various aspects of Japanese culture and have thus established Manabiya Iowa, Soten Taiko, Anime DeMoii, and the Tea House Restoration Project groups. The organization holds pre-existing funds to be used for future events and services, and the current executives took a proactive approach in reviewing the current state of the organization, developed a set of solid business plans in 2018 to sustain and grow our organization.

There is a high demand and interest in Japanese culture within the Greater Des Moines community. The importance of diversity and recognition of minority cultures and art has become a more dominant theme within our society since in the 1960s. Most of the large corporations and public schools in our country recognize this, and they are taking steps to develop more inclusive communities and progressive educational frameworks in order to encourage and foster a more diverse leadership in the future. Cultural diversity will continue to be recognized because that is the environment we live in, and we are proud to be able to help increase the level of understanding of Japanese culture and facilitate collaboration and cooperation with regard to this. The organization has already established local and international collaborative partnerships with schools, businesses, organizations, and governmental entities, and there are also many grant availabilities through larger corporations, the Japan Foundation Center of Global Partnership and other local businesses.

JAS Iowa would be able to service this community to foster networks and capacity building to support U.S.-Japan exchange and outreach with corroborations with other local nonprofits organizations by hiring a full-time executive director, continue to strive to create a strong foundation of organization and increase engagements and partnerships with the local universities, other nonprofits organizations and the businesses.

We have completed the organization's SWOT Analysis and established a Business Plan and a Strategic Plan in 2017. We then join the National Association of Japan America Society to expand our network, corroboration with other JAS organizations to exchange experiences and knowledge for capacity building of JASI.

We, Japan America Society of Iowa is proud that our 30th Anniversary Event, “Miyu, 深結 – Me and You, Celebrating 30 years of what ties us together” to enrich Japan-America relations was a very successful event. We welcomed 35 VIP perticipants honored us with their presence, approximately 300+ people have experienced Japanese cultural activities and demonstartions during the day, and approximately 100 audiences enjoyed Noh performance by Theatre Nohgaku, Taiko performance by Soten Taiko, and a reception after the performances.

JAS Iowa members had a vision of this event to be the place to share our knowledge and experience, to expand our network, and becoming even more active in an ever-growing diverse world. We had a vision to provide this milestone event as an opportunity to enrich friendship between Japan and Iowa. Started with a gift of 35 Iowa hogs and 100,000 bushels of corn in the aftermath of the 1959 typhoon at Yamanashi Prefecture, the bond of friendship between Japan and Iowa has grown vibrant and strong. Japan is the top export market for Iowa beef and pork and has become integral to the success of Iowa’s economy. When Ms. Hiroko Sogi worked to found JAS Iowa, she had a vision of rich cultural exchanges and meaningful personal relationships to opent he door of friendship. We are pround to continue that tradition to preserve that bond for generations to come.

Financials

JAPAN AMERICA SOCIETY OF IOWA
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

JAPAN AMERICA SOCIETY OF IOWA

Board of directors
as of 9/7/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Chie Schiller

Japan America Society of Iowa

Term: 2016 - 2022


Board co-chair

David Yoshimura

Tessa Hopson

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/07/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian American/Pacific Islanders/Asian
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data