Dignity Freedom Network

aka Dignity Freedom Network   |   Nampa, ID   |  www.dfnusa.org

Mission

DFN's mission is to lift up and empower marginalized and vulnerable people in India by providing education, healthcare, and economic empowerment opportunities, and trafficking prevention.

Ruling year info

2003

Executive Director

Jacque Cork

Main address

16434 N Midland Blvd #47

Nampa, ID 83687 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

41-2075995

NTEE code info

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Hospitals and Primary Medical Care Facilities (E20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Dignity Freedom Network serves the poor, marginalized and outcast peoples in India, most of whom face oppression and exclusion from society. Those who live in extreme poverty are vulnerable to human trafficking, modern slavery and other kinds of exploitation. They face malnutrition and illiteracy and a bleak future. Young girls and women in general are particularly vulnerable. DFN believes every person is worth fighting for.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Primary and Secondary Schools

107 English-medium schools in India with over 26,000 students

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Vocational training and self-help groups with the goal of financial freedom for vulnerable women and men

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

Community health workers and clinics provide healthcare and hygiene training

Population(s) Served
Families

We provide trafficking prevention through education and intervention programs. We run three shelters for girls and women who are at risk for trafficking or are coming out of trafficking.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Women and girls

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of Students Enrolled (Pre-K through 10th Standard)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Primary and Secondary Schools

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

For 2020, 80% of these students were engaged in virtual education. We are hopeful that 2021 brings them all back into the classroom.

Percentage of students going on to further education.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Primary and Secondary Schools

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of women and girls assisted to date.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Trafficking Prevention and Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our work in rurual areas in regards to healthcare and trafficking prevention and rescue continues to grow exponentially.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

At Dignity Freedom Network, our mission is dignity and freedom for the poor, marginalized and outcasts from society, and we provide education, healthcare, and economic development programs to achieve this vision. We enter the lives of the most vulnerable people in India at their invitation, standing alongside them as they work to change their communities and their nation.

Dignity Freedom Network has a four-pronged approach to bringing holistic transformation to the poor and oppressed people of India.

Schools: Education is at the heart of transformation. Dignity Freedom Network transforms communities through equal access to English education. Our first school opened in 1998 and today we serve more than 26,000 primary and secondary school children in 100+ schools. Though these schools provide a high standard of English education for all, priority is given to the most vulnerable who would otherwise remain illiterate, stigmatized and trapped in extreme poverty.

Healthcare: Our health program serves an immense need. At the grass-roots level, our Community Health Workers meet basic health needs within villages. Medical care and health testing is offered through clinics and medical camps. A purpose-built Women and Children's Hospital provides affordable surgeries and specialist healthcare for the most vulnerable.

Trafficking Prevention and Rescue: we believe that education, healthcare, and economic empowerment are the very best ways to prevent trafficking. However, there are still young girls and women that need our help. We have three shelters to raise up girls who are in vulnerable situations and are on the thresh hold of being trafficked. We also work in communities all over India to help women who want out. We provide a safe home, counseling services, and skills training.

Economic Empowerment: Skill development and economic empowerment are fundamental targets of our endeavors. The generating of sustainable livelihoods has direct impact on the health, welfare, and education of a community and contributes to the eradication of trafficking. We provide vocational training programs, government training opportunities, and business ventures operated by at-risk women and their dependents.

Dignity Freedom Network has India-based partners who implement the transformational programming in India. Our on-the-field programming has a track record for success and it is estimated that the work of more than 50 years has a reach to approximately 20 million people nationwide. DFN seeks to support the work in India through raising the needed resources, financial and otherwise, from American partners to support the Indian leadership. These donors are spread across a number of platforms and include individuals, churches, aid organizations, and charitable foundations.

DFN has a positive track record in achieving its key objectives. Since 2002, we have 107 schools with 26,000+ children, 100 Community Health Workers, thousands of economic empowerment programs and three shelters. Through the work of our Indian partners and their expanded programming reach to more than 1 million people a year.

We seek to increase enrollment in all our schools, add additional healthcare programming including a purpose-built full-service hospital, and create macro-business opportunities that create sustainability in India.

Because of COVID-19, we were able to expand our health clinics from three to nine. We have also opened 50 new virtual health clinics in remote villages. We expect to open several more of these in the coming year to serve those with no access to healthcare.

In addition, we distributed almost 2.5 million meals in 2021.

In 2021, we will open a brand new 150-bed shelter for girls at risk of trafficking and for survivors. We continue our efforts to eliminate the horrific practice of ritualized prostitution where girls are dedicated at a young age to a life of sexual slavery.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The poor and marginalized in India.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are re-working our reports and forms for child sponsorship to provide a user-friendly experience for the sponsor.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Dignity Freedom Network
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Dignity Freedom Network

Board of directors
as of 03/16/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ken Heulitt

Ken Heulitt

Peter Dance

Joseph D’souza

Kumar Swamy

Matthew Cork

Paul Sartarelli

Susan Brownlee

Mary Lucht

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/15/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.