Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Mississippi Valley

Igniting Potential

Davenport, IA   |  www.bbbsmv.org

Mission

Our vision is for all children to reach their full potential. Create one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and potential of youth.

Ruling year info

1989

Chairperson

Mr. Travis Guy

Main address

3247 E. 35th Street Court

Davenport, IA 52807 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

42-1320908

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

One-to-one youth mentoring

One-to-one mentoring programs using one of three delivery platforms: 1) Community-based mentoring matches a child one-to-one with an adult with the relationship consisting of match activities focusing on various areas of common interest in a community setting. 2) School-based mentoring matches a child with a caring adult in a mentor relationship with match activities commencing within the school setting. 3) School-based Plus mentoring matches a child with a caring adult in a mentor relationships with match activities primarily at school, but also through BBBS organized community activities.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
Sexual identity
Social and economic status

Where we work

Accreditations

BBBSA 2014

Awards

Integrity Flame Award 2018

Better Business Bureau

Affiliations & memberships

MENTOR: National Mentoring Partnership - Respondent 2014

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2012

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America 2014

Chamber of Commerce 2012

United Way Member Agency 2014

Iowa Mentoring Partnership 2014

Quad Cities Behavioral Health Coalition 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Self-Confidence- A sense of being able to do or accomplish something once it is started

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status

Related Program

One-to-one youth mentoring

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Decision-making- Thinks before acting and is aware of consequences of behavior

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Self-Esteem- how he or she feels about themselves

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Behavior- has appropriate actions, manners and conduct both in and out of the classroom

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Expresses feelings- reveals, talks about and discusses feelings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Sense of future- knows about educational and career opportunities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Self-motivation- has enthusiasm or drive to do something

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number children performing average or above average academically

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students served who earn passing grades in core subjects

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our primary goal is to make and sustain one-to-one mentoring relationships between vulnerable children and trained and supported adult mentors.
We believe that providing this consistent resource to a child can develop the confidence and motivation to succeed both academically and socially.
Long term/consistent relationships to BBBS means the "match" meets an average of 4 to 10 hours a month for at least one calendar year. Research supports that an adult must be consistent in a child's live for at least six months before they can have a positive and lasting impact on a child's behavior and attitude. We expect to obtain 90% of our matches achieving the 6 month retention level and 80% obtaining the 1 year match length.
50% of our matches last at least 2.9 years, with 25% lasting 4 years or longer.
Once we achieve the consistency of the match relationship, we strive to improve the outcomes of the relationship. This is measured by the academic and social achievements of the child. The mentor emphasizes value based behavior and decision making and exposes the child to positive opportunities, experiences and resources in the community. As the match grows with the age of the child, our organization introduces more age appropriate opportunities/exposures and goals for the child.
In 2013, the organization launched a series of enhancements at the middle/high school level that uses the strength of the mentor relationship to introduce career, higher education and employment exposures and opportunities. The Career Navigator program allows matches to visit companies in the area to learn about careers, education, teamwork, communication and compensation. Our Job Readiness program positions the young adult for summer employment, including setting up a checking account, planning workdays, and excelling in a diverse workplace. We also offer college readiness programs including campus tours, financial aid, certificate program opportunities and apprenticeship programs. In 2017, BBBS launched a mentoring program that matches adults in the STEM field with young adults with strong aptitude in these areas. In 2020, the organization launched new DEI initiatives to bridge racial, economic, and other divides between our volunteers, families, children, educators and partners. In 2021, the organization launched new parent engagement initiatives to build the relationship between families, mentors and our organization. Our match retention rate remains nearly 90% annually, with our average match length over 3.5 years.

5-10 year vision
•Top 5-10% performing BBBS affiliate in the country
•Similar/balanced youth impact- elementary (40%), middle (30%), high school (30%)
•Enhanced support/structured programming for middle and high school matches
•Defined milestones/resources/incentives: ACT, Employment, workforce readiness, academic achievement, social performance
•Regional programming- consistent program offerings across a region, larger area
•Stronger/vested partners
•Balanced and consistent funding mix, long term funding component
•Strong connection with national office and best practice trends
•Partners self-generating/self-initiating support for BBBS
•Relationships (with more longer-term than current)
•Youth engagement (with more longer term than current)
•Engagement opportunities and trainings for matches
•Parent engagement at the middle and high school levels
•Mission message over funding message?

Key Strategic Summary from Board Sessions:
•Steady growth is vital to maintaining a balanced program
•Growth will happen at all program levels
•BBBSMV resource should be focused on strengthening school/community relationships that can achieve strategy.
•A balanced and diversified funding mix of both local and regional sources is important
•The organization needs to focus on transitions of existing matches/child from elementary programs.
Engage community resources in assisting us to develop a strong middle/high school mentoring model.
•Ensure that its organizational structure is able to maintain and sustain a K-12 strategy
•Engage our stakeholders in the K-12 strategy including: Bigs, parents, children, schools, community stakeholders, staff, and board.
•Devise a solid business plan to achieve a K-12 strateg.

BBBSMV K-12 strategic focus areas:
School Relations
1.Valued strategic partner
2.Engaged at multiple levels of school system- elected, admin, building, classroom, levels
3.Funding/volunteer/research tools to drive common goals
4.Intentional and focused:
5.Program Enhancement
6.Milestones
7.Collaborations- common partners
8.Research
9.BBBSA Model- long term study locally

Program Mix
Setting and achieving strategic balance of program mix and impact
1.40% Elementary
2.30% Middle
3.30% High School
4.Processing

Program Structure
1.Program Models (one-to-one/Group Mentoring),
2.Transitions
3.Milestones (Common Core),
4.Waiting List Support
5.Activities,
6.Enrollment,
7.Enhanced Match Support
8.Measurements
9.Staffing

Image & Awareness
1.Branding packagingSocial Media
3.Networking Events
4.Communications,
5.Recognition (board, Bigs, workplaces)
6.Highlighting match activities
7.Public Speaking Strategy
8.BBBS Ambassadors

Funding
1.Endowment,
2.Regional Resources,
3.Government Funding,
4.Cash Flow
5.Donor targeting
6.Networking events
7.Alumni tracking
8.Wish List
9.Events
10.Mentor Lane
11.Impact circles
12.Community Partners
13.Database management

BBBSMV has a full time CEO/President with over 20 years experience in non-profit management. The organization has staffing and a board structure to drive both financial and program outcomes. The structure includes 15 full time staff, 15 AmeriCorps members and a board of directors that include 21 community and educational leaders.

The organization incorporates a strategic planning process utilizing the SWAT process and updates its plan on an annual basis.

The organization emphasizes quality over quantity and maintaining a balanced funding mix of local sources.

BBBSMV has focused recently on adjusting is funding mix away from taxpayer and government funding sources to more local sources. As a result, the organization has seen a significant reduction of taxpayer sources within it's operating budget. Five years ago, the organization funding mix had 55% of its sources tied to a taxpayer source. In 2015, the organization expects to have less than 5% of its funding mix from taxpayer sources.
BBBSMV has been successful at adjusting both its expense and income structure to be more economically viable and stable long term. The organization has also recommitted itself to the long term success of the children within its trust. The organization has embraced a number of enhancements within its programming to drive matches involving middle and high school youth to help achieve graduation and economic self-sufficiency. This includes job readiness and employment programs involving the adult mentoring, college and trade school opportunities for youth, career exploration, and STEM initiatives.
The resources allocated to these areas have helped deepen the match relationship and drive the young adult to obtain specific skills and assets to be successful as adults.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Adults between 18-80 (as volunteer mentors, committee/board volunteers, donors) Parent/Guardians Children enrolled and participating in our mentoring program Education partners (administration, counselors, teachers) of children in our program Social service and community partners- collaborators, donors, referral agencies

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    video taping in-person meetings/trainings for those unable to attend, but wanting to stay current and up to date on our trends and happenings.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Provides staff with the clear direction and confidence to move forward. Increases engagement and participation on all stakeholders. Provides a diverse perspective that improves our DEI goals.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Mississippi Valley
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Mississippi Valley

Board of directors
as of 11/28/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Travis Guy

Modern Woodmen of America

Term: 2020 - 2022

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Addy Kieger

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Chris Barnard

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Pat Baldwin

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Joe Farrell

Operating Engineers

Ashley Hendon

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Amanda Motto

Attorney at Law

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Eric Reinsch

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Ben Palmer

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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/10/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/10/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.