Human Services

International Institute of Metropolitan St. Louis

  • St. Louis, MO
  • www.iistl.org

Mission Statement

To help immigrants and their families be productive Americans and to champion ethnic diversity as a cultural and economic strength.

Main Programs

  1. Job Training & Placement
  2. Education, including ESOL
  3. Client Services, including Refugee Resettlement & Mental Health
  4. Economic Development, including Peer Lending Circle & Global Farm
  5. Culture & Community, incl Festival of Nations, II Business Solutions Center, & Ethnic Mediation
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

Immersion services (English classes, job training and placement, refugee resettlement and counseling) provided primarily to immigrants living in the City of St. Louis or St. Louis County; Investment services (microlending, and small business development technical assistance) for immigrants in St. Louis multi-county region; as of March 1, 2012, employability services for refugees offered at II Southwest MO Branch office in Springfield, MO. Inclusion services (Festival of Nations, interpretation & translation, cross-cultural training and consulting) local, statewide and national in scope.

ruling year

1938

President & CEO since 1978

Self-reported

Ms. Anna E. Crosslin

Keywords

Self-reported

refugees, immigrants, ESOL, employment, counseling, economic development, small business, elderly services, immigration, citizenship, refugee resettlement, anti-trafficking, festival, ethnic, cultural

Notes from the Nonprofit

America is becoming increasingly dependent on immigrants to provide new population, a youthful workforce, and economic opportunity. Immigrants are valuable employees and colleagues, entrepreneurs, taxpayers, and consumers. The International Institute, a pioneer in the field of diversity, helps ensure that St. Louis immigrants are successful.

Annually, our wide array of adjustment services reaches more than 7,500 immigrants from 80 countries, approximately 5% of the St. Louis City and County foreign-born population, according to the most recent census. Thousands more attend and participate in our annual Festival of Nations, especially as performers and volunteers. We are respected by and have strong multigenerational ties to most local immigrant communities. Our staff are key consultants on a broad range of issues affecting the social, cultural and economic health of our region.

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Also Known As

International Institute of St. Louis

EIN

43-0652640

 Number

1011511763

Physical Address

3401 Arsenal St.

St. Louis, MO 63118

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Ethnic/Immigrant Services (P84)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

Cultural, Ethnic Awareness (A23)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

For 95 years, we been operating highly-effective programs to help integrate immigrants quickly and strengthen the St. Louis region as well. For example:

Literacy Gains
Our students learn better. Annually, nearly 85% of our immigrant students improve their literacy and/or English skills as compared to national and state-mandated standards of 52%.

Job Placements
Refugees we sponsor for resettlement go to work soon. Within 6 months of arrival in the US, approximately 75% of newly arrived refugee families include at least one wage-earner. Two-thirds of their jobs include medical benefits compared to 60% among all jobs (Census figure).

Small Business Development
Our immigrant-owned businesses stay in business. Nearly 75% of small businesses we help start or expand are still operating at 36 months -- a favorable comparison with the Small Business Administration's 25% survival rate.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Job Training & Placement

We are St. Louis’ most reliable authority when hiring and retaining an ethnically-diverse workforce. Our Workforce Solutions Program staff helps employers manage their workforce effectively and efficiently. We screen, match and refer work-authorized immigrant and refugee job candidates; interpret during interviews; provide training for new employees about public transportation; and follow up to help ease each new employee’s job transition. We also offer fee-based interpreter/translator services, customized workforce diversity training, and work-site English classes. Many of our job candidates fill jobs in construction; health care; hospitality and tourism; light manufacturing and assembly; and transportation. There is no employment fee charged to job candidates or employers. Thus, employers receive a $1,500 value for each job candidate hired. Program costs are underwritten by government grants, earned income, and charitable contributions.

Category

None

Population(s) Served

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Adults

None

Budget

$605,272.00

Program 2

Education, including ESOL

We help speakers of other languages develop the English literacy skills and knowledge of American culture that they need to live, work and study successfully in the US. Utilizing various grants and private underwriting, we teach more than 1,500 students annually.There is no fee charged to students or employers for our classes since we are the largest state-funded ESOL site in Missouri.Our services include English conversation and grammar; life skills reading and writing; job search skills; workplace communication; American culture and customs; citizenship preparation; literacy skills; and basic computer skills. To attend, students must be at least 17 years old and not enrolled in a public secondary institution; they must be able to commit to regular attendance for at least six months after registration. Classes are available weekday mornings, afternoons and evenings.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Adults

Budget

$655,277.00

Program 3

Client Services, including Refugee Resettlement & Mental Health

We facilitate the transition of newcomer immigrants and refugees to St. Louis. Annually, we provide case management services, sponsor refugees from war-torn countries around the world, assist refugees sponsored by other agencies, and provide counseling and therapy services.For refugees we sponsor, we meet them at the airport, take them to housing we have rented, offer a special enhanced orientation program, and otherwise help them begin the process of building a new life in America. Depending on the needs of the refugee family, services can include registration for adult English classes at the Institute and at public school for children, job program registration, and on-going orientation. A small per capita grant is provided to newly arrived refugees by the federal government. The grant provides funds for three months of housing, initial food and transportation, and for other modest survival needs.
Specialty services in social work, counseling, elderly, and human trafficking are also provided. Our social work team offers a range of services, including those addressing parenting information, medical access, substance abuse, persistent mental illness, and family conflict. Counseling focuses on trauma from forced migration. Our Elderly Services Program operates quarterly events for refugees 60+. Events address a range of topics, including Medicare, weatherization, disaster preparedness, and hearing and speech.In our Human Trafficking Program, we oversee four Rescue and Restore Coalitions to raise awareness about the issue and help link possible victims to service providers. Our region includes all of Eastern MO and Southwest IL.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Budget

$2,331,844.00

Program 4

Economic Development, including Peer Lending Circle & Global Farm

Our staff helps immigrants achieve their financial dreams. Program services improve the economic stability and future potential of immigrants, especially recently-arrived refugees; generate positive economic impact to strengthen St.; Louis (job creation and sales increases); and leverage public dollars by creating public-private partnerships. To that end, we offer a variety of economic opportunity programs, including matching savings accounts known as the IDA Program. With matched savings, immigrants can buy or repair a home or a reliable car, enroll in post-secondary education, or start or expand a small business. We also identify potential immigrant entrepreneurs, help them prepare a loan package, make micro-loans of up to $35,000 through our subsidiary corporation, and provide ongoing technical assistance once the loan has been made to assure the success of the new business. These activities not only build capacity for our clients, they also mitigate risk for our lending arm, the International Institute Community Development Corporation (IICDC).
Our Peer Lending Circle model is simple. Low-income refugee and immigrant women can receive micro-business loans of $1,000 each to help them finance the start or strengthening of a micro-business. These loans are interest-free and must be paid back within 18 months of loan closings.
Founded in 2010, the II Global Farms (IIGF) Initiative provides job training for refugees with agricultural skills. Refugees learn about managing farmland and selling their products with an eye toward starting their own business at program graduation.
Finally, Home-Based Child Care Training is our most recent addition. In 2011, we began to train refugee women to operate a home-based child care business according to professional standards and in accordance with state regulations. The program provides training in child care practices, small business development, and state regulations.

Category

Community Development

Population(s) Served

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Budget

$398,111.00

Program 5

Culture & Community, incl Festival of Nations, II Business Solutions Center, & Ethnic Mediation

We help newcomers better integrate by offering training in civic engagement, mediation, and community-building to benefit our clients and the community-at-large. And we help St. Louisans build appreciation for cultural diversity by sponsoring special events, including our annual Festival of Nations, our region’s largest and most diverse annual multicultural festival. FoN held each August now draws more than 140,000 visitors. And collaborate with civic, business, education and other sectors on initiatives that will create a more welcoming community for newcomer immigrants – a vital sector to attract if St. Louis wants to strengthen its economy.
 
Annually, we offer fee-based interpreter and translator services to more than 350 companies looking to enhance their global connections. Additionally, our highly acclaimed staff and consultants offer customized consulting, research and training to meet a whole host of needs. Such revenue is an importance source of underwriting for other agency programs that depend heavily on government and foundation underwriting.

Category

Public, Society Benefit

Population(s) Served

Immigrants/Newcomers/Refugees

Budget

$572,327.00

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Number of clients reporting increased knowledge after educational programs

Target Population
Adults, Immigrants, newcomers, refugees

Connected to a Program?
Education, including ESOL
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Adult refugee & immigrant students with limited English proficiency skills who after 60 hrs of Core English classes show improvement. Average improvement in the state of MO is 70%, IISTL is 85%.

2. Number of clients who complete job skills training

Target Population
Immigrants, newcomers, refugees

Connected to a Program?
Job Training & Placement
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
We offer 3 job-specific training classes: CNA, housekeeping, and sewing. Clients are counted for those who complete the training. Due to the economy improving in 2015 the client enrollment decreased.

3. Number of savings accounts used by clients

Target Population
Immigrants, newcomers, refugees

Connected to a Program?
Economic Development, including Peer Lending Circle & Global Farm
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
The Individual Development Account started in 2013. It is a matched savings account program for our clients to save for homes, college educations or other purchases.

4. Number of return website visitors

Target Population
General/Unspecified

Connected to a Program?
Culture & Community, incl Festival of Nations, II Business Solutions Center, & Ethnic Mediation
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
We are increasingly harnessingthe power of the internet and social networking venues as well educating, celebrating, and connecting St. Louis’ of many diverse constituencies.

5. Number of clients placed

Target Population
Immigrants, newcomers, refugees

Connected to a Program?
Client Services, including Refugee Resettlement & Mental Health
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Our resettlement program continues to help refugees build new lives in St. Louis. In the first months after their arrival, we address basic needs for refugees, including food, housing & clothes.

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    We have had a hand in the resettlement and integration of nearly every new immigrant population in the St. Louis region for almost 100 years. We work with newcomers to provide initial housing, jobs, orientation, and health support as needed. Later we provide citizenship and other community integration services that are vital during what is, for many immigrants, a lifelong adjustment process.

    Awareness is growing that immigrants add value to our community and state. A large number are entrepreneurs, especially in high tech and science-related fields. They are also valuable new consumers and can help reverse population loss in the St. Louis region – a trend since the mid-last century.

    The 2016-18 Strategic Plan charts our future direction by building on this competitive edge regarding depth and breadth of services and knowledge. It does so by advancing four strategic imperatives to benefit our clients and customers, local businesses, and the community at large.

    1. OFFER TOP-NOTCH, FIRST-TOUCH SERVICES - Provide a continuum of superior immersion services for immigrants and their families.

    In the new period of 2016-18, IISTL will strive to maintain quality and expand capacity in our core services to serve more refugee arrivals in St. Louis and at our new satellite location in Springfield. We will also grow our supplemental services, especially those that benefit the economic well-being of our clients. Examples include our urban farm, citizenship preparation, and job training initiatives.

    2. FACILITATE FAMILY AND COMMUNITY ECONOMIC GROWTH - Provide superior investment services for both our customers and the larger St. Louis metropolitan community.

    We will help start or expand immigrant-owned and operated small businesses by providing technical support, micro-loans, and credit counseling. A portion of these services will be offered through IISTL's wholly owned subsidiary, the II Community Development Corporation (IICDC).

    3. FOSTER POSITIVE COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS - Provide superior inclusion services for the greater St. Louis area.

    IISTL will seek more ways for immigrants and native-born Americans to better appreciate and value one another, especially by further growing Festival of Nations. Also, we will continue to lead the public engagement charge in-person and with technology. In partnership with parallel efforts both locally and nationally, we will advocate on behalf of immigrants and diversity issues.

    4. ENSURE AGENCY SUSTAINABILITY - Ensure the long-term sustainability of the International Institute for the benefit of the St. Louis region.

    We will continue to expand our communications, training, and revenue-building initiatives to more strongly position the Institute as the region's premier resource for diversity and inclusion. We will also seek ways to add more programming at our new headquarters campus and to utilize it as a revenue generator.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    PROVIDE ONGOING ADJUSTMENT SERVICES:

    We will explore more funding options for the refugee resettlement program services and staffing, to ease the high level of volatility in funding and services resulting from uncontrollable external forces. Meanwhile, we will look to grow our specialty services, especially to new communities of immigrants.

    ADVANCE LONG-TERM, SUSTAINABLE SELF-SUFFICIENCY:

    We will double the number of immigrant microloans and grow the size of the microloan fund accordingly. We will also tackle sustainability issues for several small business initiatives, including our urban farming program.

    BUILD APPRECIATION FOR THE DIVERSE CULTURAL TRADITIONS AND CONTRIBUTIONS OF IMMIGRANTS:

    We will seek to help bridge the cultural gap by producing our annual Festival of Nations to offer newcomers and long-timers with a means to explore and better appreciate each other's cultures. And we will explore ways to connect the stories of new immigrants with common American traditions, like cooking, family celebrations, and the arts.

    STRENGTHEN KNOWLEDGE AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS ACROSS ST. LOUIS POPULATIONS:

    We will offer more community presentations and cross-cultural training sessions and consult with area civic and corporate leaders to develop a welcoming community for immigrants and their families.

    PROVIDE LEADERSHIP AND ADVOCACY:

    It is not enough to make presentations and provide trainings. We must also more strongly strategically align ourselves with regional and national entities and actively promote the positive social, cultural and economic impact of immigrants, especially in cooperation with local corporate and economic development sectors.

    GENERATE MORE FINANCIAL AND NON-FINANCIAL RESOURCES:

    A multi-year Revenue Plan is being developed. The plan will review and assess current charitable fundraising and earned income sources and explore emerging revenue-building opportunities with individuals and businesses. In-kind issues including volunteerism, donated goods and services will also be reviewed.

    ENHANCE THE AGENCY'S BRAND AND IMAGE:

    Utilizing social networking and electronic communications, we will further engage Millennials. We will electronically publish a series of News Briefs as well as client and program-specific stories to appeal to stakeholders of all ages. And we will work to increase the number of visitors and length of visits to our web sites.

    OPERATE IN A LEGAL, PROFESSIONAL, AND ETHICAL MANNER AND PROVIDE STRONG, IMPACTFUL PROGRAMS:

    We will focus on maintaining our accreditations, expanding our business continuity plan, identifying more ways to integrate technology into our work, expanding intra-agency communication, and maintaining high fiscal and quality standards.
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    The International Institute of St. Louis, established in 1919, is a pioneer in the field of diversity. The Institute's highly-acclaimed programs are arranged in three service pillars: 1. Immersion (New arrivals); 2. Investment (Business development); and 3. Inclusion (Community integration). In all, our comprehensive array of adjustment services annually reaches more than 8,000 immigrants from 75 countries, approximately 8% of the St. Louis City and County 2010 foreign-born population. Our annual Festival of Nations is among our region's most popular events, drawing 140,000 visitors for a weekend of fun-filled yet educational exploration of the growing diversity of St. Louis' residents.

    The Institute's staff of 75 is joined by more than 500 volunteers including student interns, AmerCorps and VISTA workers, and others. More than 150 local, statewide and national organizations serve as partners, collaborators and supporters of our services and mission.

    Approximately 65% of revenue in our +$5 million annual budget comes from federal, state and local grants. We are a member of the United Way of Greater St. Louis and the US Committee for Refugees and Immigrants.

    As a result, the Institute has important multigenerational ties to local immigrant communities. Our programs and services are locally and nationally-acclaimed. We also have deep knowledge of the state of the immigrant communities and population trends. Thus, we are well-positioned to serve as key consultants on a broad range of issues affecting the social, cultural and economic health of our region.

    Thus, we are also well-positioned to develop further strategic alliances with the corporate sector. As our region, state and nation grow even more diverse, businesses will increasingly look to us for access, knowledge and training to expand their consumer markets and workforces.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    We are proactive in program development – on the cutting edge of identifying and implementing new programs. IIBSC and IICDC are examples of how we've taken for-profit business strategies and modified them to meet a social purpose as well. Our programs are looked to as best practices, by others around the nation.

    All our program goals and measurable outcomes are tied to the strategic metrics in our Board approved strategic plan. In 2012, we met or exceeded 30 of the 32 strategic metrics: % of active job seekers getting jobs < 9 months of registration (-10%) and % of assisted small business owners who increase family income after 24 months (-23%). Not surprising: EWG Median Household Income from 2007-11 dropped 8.5 percent in the region.

    In May 2010, the International Institute staff migrated individual and family client data to a leading cloud-based case management software application. At the same time Institute staff introduced an electronic version of the client progress assessment we named C-SET (Client Success Evaluative Tool) to track and view progress at the individual client level. C-SET is an internally developed 30-question tool with which we record progress with results retained in client files in Penelope.

    Each case management client has a Family C-SET and a Personal C-SET completed six times by the assigned bilingual case aide during the course of their first three years in the program. The measurement scale ranges from 1-90 points, with the scale divided into three categories: At-Risk, Stable, and Successful. Approximately one-third of the range falls in each category.

    Family C-SET assessment categories are: Housing, Family, Finances, Benefits, Basic Needs, and Social Support. Additional Personal C-SETs are available for Employable Adults, Unemployable Adults, Children/Youth, and the Elderly. Each Personal Set can include the following categories: Employment, Education/ESL, Medical Care, Emotional Adjustment, Relationships, and Community Integration.

    Our Board-approved strategic metric related to C-SET calls for at least 80% of our clients to attain 80% of possible points (72 of 90 points) within 12 months of arrival. In 2012, 95% of clients attained or surpassed the stated goal.
  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    In late 2012, we instituted the new graphic format for the aforementioned C-SET. It will take several years of history to identify trends or reflect on outcomes for our clients as a whole. It is still evolving as we continue to refine our documentation methods.

    In any case, the results of the C-SET process have already been having a positive programmatic impact, most notably in our refugee case management intake and orientation processes. Client progress (or lack thereof) as noted on the Personal and Family C-SET assessments has enabled staff to modify our information-sharing and training opportunities to ensure that they are conveying the most relevant information in the best learning environment.

    For instance, we discovered that while newly-arrived families were receiving household safety orientation in their native language on arrival, they only had limited retention after a short period. So, staff obtained an award from the Gannett Foundation to video tape key household orientation including safety tips and to offer it in native languages. The 15-minute video was produced in spring 2013 and is now available in Nepalese and Arabic. Plans are underway for 4 additional languages including Somali. As a result, new arrivals can replay the safety video multiple times until the information is synthesized.
Service Areas

Self-reported

National

Immersion services (English classes, job training and placement, refugee resettlement and counseling) provided primarily to immigrants living in the City of St. Louis or St. Louis County; Investment services (microlending, and small business development technical assistance) for immigrants in St. Louis multi-county region; as of March 1, 2012, employability services for refugees offered at II Southwest MO Branch office in Springfield, MO. Inclusion services (Festival of Nations, interpretation & translation, cross-cultural training and consulting) local, statewide and national in scope.

Social Media

Funding Needs

Like most charitable non-profits, we are challenged to meet the diverse and growing client and community needs. So we work to gain contributions and grant opportunities. Our work in helping bring city and county governments together to better understand and appreciate the positive economic of immigration is of increasing importance. We are looking to social entrepreneurship to narrow the gap between government funding and community In the past decade, we have focused on building fee-based business by marketing interpretation & translation as well as cross-cultural training and consulting. We are also seeking corporations interested in reaching immigrant customer markets by identifying their services or products with our Festival of Nations brand. As our community's hub for international and immigrant information and services, we offer a unique opportunity to link businesses with these new customer and employee pools.

Affiliations + Memberships

United Way Member Agency

photos




External Reviews

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF METROPOLITAN ST LOUIS
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

International Institute of Metropolitan St. Louis

Leadership

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President & CEO

Ms. Anna E. Crosslin

BIO

Anna Crosslin has led the International Institute of St. Louis for over 35 years. Founded in 1919, the IISTL is the region's Welcoming Center for new Americans. The Institute's three pillars of service are Immersion, Investment and Inclusion. More than 7,500 immigrants from 80 countries receive services including English classes, refugee resettlement, job placement, business development, and career path services. She has been instrumental in the founding and operation of the St. Louis Mosaic Project, a nationally recognized multi-sector led immigration attraction initiative.

Crosslin is the recipient of numerous recognitions and awards, including annual recognition for nearly two decades on the St. Louis Business Journal's “Most Influential St. Louisans." She is a past recipient of leadership awards from the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership, William T. Kemper Foundation, World Trade Center, YWCA, St. Louis Civil Rights Enforcement Agency, St. Louis Children's Hospital Board, and FOCUS St. Louis. She is a Board member of the St. Louis Regional Chamber. In June 2015, she was recognized as a White House Champion of Change for World Refugee Day. Crosslin has two honorary doctorates – one from Webster University and another from Washington University, her alma mater.

STATEMENT FROM THE President & CEO

"During my 35 years with the International Institute, I have helped the organization grow from a small, largely unknown human service agency to a major service provider with influence in the social, cultural and economic sectors of our region. Immigrants and refugees start businesses, fill vacant housing stock, and are the single largest flow of population to a region with a core that has steadily lost population in the last 60 years. They are part of the solution to many of our community's challenges."

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Amit Shah

MiTek Industries, Inc.

Term: Apr 2016 - Apr 2018

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.
Race & Ethnicity
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.
Middle Eastern, Middle Eastern
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Diversity Strategies
No
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
Yes
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity