Council of Churches of the Ozarks

aka Council of Churches of the Ozarks, Inc   |   Springfield, MO   |  http://www.ccozarks.org

Mission

The mission of the Council of Churches of the Ozarks (CCO) is to improve the quality of life in our region through collaborative outreach in the name of Jesus Christ, by doing together what can best be done together.

Ruling year info

1969

Principal Officer

Jaimie Trussell

Main address

627 N. Glenstone Ave

Springfield, MO 65802 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

43-0903657

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Services to Promote the Independence of Specific Populations (P80)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is not required to file an annual return with the IRS because it is a religious organization.

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Creating a higher level of transparency, program evaluation/effectiveness, and stewardship.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Child Care Food Program

Child Care Food Program (CCFP) is a reimbursement program for licensed and registered daycare providers.
CCFP is administered by the United States Department of Agriculture, managed and directed by the Missouri Department of Health, and sponsored by the Council of Churches of the Ozarks.

The Child Care Food Program currently serves more than 150 providers representing a 42 -county area, with over 4,000 children enrolled. Through our program, child care providers can focus on serving higher quality meals without straining other program resources. We believe that regardless of geographic location and economic standing, all children deserve access to healthy and nutritious meals.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children
Infants and toddlers

Ambassadors for Children’s (AFC) purpose is to restore dignity to all local youth in foster care. We want them to know they are valued and loved by providing physical items and support that will, in turn, boost their self-esteem. AFC is an outreach service of the Council of Churches of the Ozarks.
Children often leave their homes with nothing more than a grocery sack full of belongings. A loss of family, belongings, and place diminishes their unique identity.

By partnering with Ambassadors for Children, YOU provide an opportunity for children in foster care to use their voice, express their personalities, and enjoy the experience of new clothes, shoes, and essentials. They can pursue extra-curricular activities and receive needed therapies. These opportunities help restore dignity and self-worth to the youth in care!

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Preteens
Children

Crosslines inspires hope for food-insecure families, seniors, and children by addressing immediate hunger needs with access to food and essential items. Crosslines is an outreach of the Council of Churches of the Ozarks.
Crosslines* – where the lines of compassion and concern cross the lines of human need.

Crosslines’ assistance is critical for the nearly 25% of our community who are unsure where their next meal will come from (Springfield Community Focus Report, 2019).

Crosslines is committed to addressing needs in an environment that fosters community, dignity, and compassion. As the largest client-direct food pantry in Greene County, Missouri, Crosslines serves nearly 70,000 people annually through a client-choice pantry, mobile food distributions, holiday assistance, and multiple senior food programs.

Crosslines provides emergency food assistance and lovingly connects guests to other community services.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

Connections Handyman Service (CHS) inspires hope for low-income, seniors, and disabled homeowners of all ages with free essential home repairs that empower them to live safely in their own homes.
Every 11 seconds a senor is treated in the ER due to a fall. In order to prevent falls and support healthy living, it’s important to provide solutions for homeowners with limited incomes.

Home repair projects include, but are not limited to, access ramp construction, bathroom modification for accessibility, window repair, plumbing, and HVAC repairs. CHS provides services to approximately 100 Greene County seniors each year.

The need for services is based on referrals or an individual’s direct application with CHS.

The need for services is based on referrals or an individual’s direct application with CHS. Once the referral is received and validated through a home visit, a licensed professional evaluates the request, which is then submitted to the CHS director for review and funding approval.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Long-term Care Ombudsman inspires hope for care home residents by providing advocacy, support, and assistance to empower them to receive the comfort and care they deserve.
Across the United States, over 2 million seniors live in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. The Council of Churches’ Long-term Care Ombudsman Program is part of the State of Missouri’s Ombudsman Program. Ombudsman is a Swedish word, meaning “representative.” Each state is required by the Federal Older Americans Act (OAA) to have advocates and representatives in care facilities, and program advocates address complaints from residents and champion improvements to the long-term care system.

The Council’s Ombudsman program serves residents in over 20 counties in Southwest Missouri. Volunteers ensure all residents are informed of their rights, which include physician choice, freedom from abuse and restraint, participation in one’s care, ability to manage one’s finances, and retaining marital rights.

 

Population(s) Served

The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) utilizes the experience and compassion of adults 55 and older to inspire hope in children through tutoring and mentoring.
Volunteers help Pre-k through third graders develop the social, emotional, and literacy skills needed to be successful in school and in life. They also provide grocery shopping services and social engagement to homebound Greene County seniors.

Population(s) Served
Older adults
Seniors
Older adults
Seniors

One Stop for Early Childhood inspires hope for all families and caregivers by providing information, resources and education which supports the development of young children with the purpose of kindergarten readiness and school success.
Families and caregivers in need receive on-going support to locate financial assistance, child care, housing, counseling, and other services. This helps families be strong and resilient. In addition, The One Stop provides training and technical assistance for families, child care providers, and early care professionals.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Safe to Sleep (STS) inspires hope for women experiencing homelessness by providing shelter and case management services, which help them overcome obstacles to sustainable housing.
Once the guest’s immediate need for shelter is met, the focus turns to transportation to and from appointments, connection with medical and mental health specialists, and document readiness for housing/employment — all with the goal of permanent housing. Safe to Sleep is the only local low-barrier “women’s” shelter available 365 days a year.

Since 2011, Safe to Sleep has provided a safe haven for more than 2,700 homeless women. In an atmosphere of dignity and compassion, women have safe shelter and support services to move them from scarcity to security.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Seniors
Older adults

Diaper Bank of the Ozarks keeps babies healthy and happy by distributing diapers – disposable and cloth – through partner agencies and to families in need throughout the Ozarks.
The top three responses to partner agency surveys show that diapers have allowed families to have:

Reduced Stress
Lowers the chance of maternal depression, domestic abuse and child abuse related to the stress of diaper need.
Better Finances
Ability to pay other bills / save money and the ability to buy food for their families
Improved Life Quality
Families also reported less diaper rashes, less crying from baby and baby sleeps better at night.
We’ve distributed 6,523,816 diapers since 2012!

Population(s) Served

Every Child Deserves a Happy Birthday! Wish I May is an important piece of The One Stop by providing ‘Happy Birthdays’ to underprivileged children and their parents/guardians in Greene County.
The children we reach are those whose families are experiencing extreme financial difficulties and find it impossible to provide even the smallest birthday celebration. Wish I May is volunteer-based and donation driven. We want every gift and donation given to go straight to the families we serve.

Wish I May knows that every child’s birthday is important and that even when parents and guardians don’t have the means to provide, the toys given through our organization let them give their children a special day. Too many families find themselves lacking the funds to be able to provide a birthday for their children.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Infants and toddlers
Children
Adolescents
Preteens

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Number of people using homeless shelters per week

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Safe to Sleep

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

2019-We housed 519 women 2020- We housed 274 women 2021- We housed 281 women We are the only immediate access women' shelter in our service area. We saw a decline in service during the pandemic.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Intake:
We are redefining the intake process for all programs across the organization. The purpose of this is to have one centralized process that helps connect program beneficiaries to all service areas of the organization. This will allow them to recieve wrap around services aimed at helping them move from scarcity to security.

Infrastructure:
We are moving all programs into one location and restructuring our programs to allow for the highest possible impact, stewardship, and accountability.

Metrics:
We are redefining what metrics we capture to be able to better serve the individuals and families that come to us for help everyday. We are looking at more targeted stats which we will use to constantly evaluate our program and organizational effectiveness.

Intake:
We are collaborating as a team and with our program beneficiaries to evaluate the best possible approach to a centralized intake. The intake process will be help to a program cycle management evaluation annually to ensure we are addressing needs.

Infrastructure:
This is being completed in three phases. First is creating strategic plans and vision with each program area. Step two is finding ways to incorporate other programs and place into a new structure that fuels our future vision. Step three is havingthe excutive team complete a restructure strategy and org chart based off of the afore mentioned information and then present that plan to program directors to gain their final thoughts and insight.

Metrics:
As part of each programs strategic planning, we are included existing metrics as well as metrics to meet the new vision for each service area. These metrics will be evaluated regularly to ensure we are doing our best to serve clients and to constantly be evolving as an organization.

Our organization enlisted the assistance of external leadership to help facilitate the creation of our 2021 strategic plan.

On our executive staff we have a diverse and experienced group of leaders that have years of experience in development, management, and program development. Our program directors possess an exceptional amount of knowledge in their respective fields, and are well versed in our community issues.

Our organization also works hard to collaborate with other area non profits in order to continue learning and developing our work.

We are currently in progress of our program restructure phase with the executive leadership team, and are preparing to role out the plan to our program directors for collaboration.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our organization serves almost as a one stop for people needing assistance. We have our food pantry, foster program, senior services, child reading and math programs, financial assistance programs, a homeless shelter for women and more. The population we serve is diverse and we do our best to serve anyone that come to us for help.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We began doing a self shop option at our food pantry as an opportunity for people we serve to select food items they enjoy and know how to prepare.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback has been a critical componant to our work since we began. We want to empower people to have a voice and choice in their lives and speak into the things that are going to make them the most successful.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Council of Churches of the Ozarks
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Council of Churches of the Ozarks

Board of directors
as of 03/25/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Britton Jobe

Burell

Term: 2017 - 2023

Linda Merkling

Prosource Wholesale

Keith Noble

Commerce Bank

Anitra Appleby

COGIC

Callie Carrol

Old Missouri Bank

Cora Scott

City of Springfield

Andrew Tasset

Central Bank of the Ozarks & Central Trust Company

Bob Perry

Minster/Consultant

Tyler Padgitt

The Courageous Church

Bill Hennessey

Mercy Health

Fr. David Kendrick

St. Johns Episcopal Church

Joe Costello

Commercial Real Estate Broker

Jim Anderson

Cox Health

Jay Guffey

Mercy Health (Retired)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/25/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/25/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.