PLATINUM2020

AFTER THE HOMESTRETCH-ARIZONA

Every former racehorse deserves a loving home...

Phoenix, AZ   |  www.afterthehomestretchaz.org

Mission

"To Protect the Legacy of Former Racehorses through Education, Reconditioning, Retraining, and Re-homing".

Our goal is to prepare our horses for new, adoptive homes. The majority of our horses have recently retired from the track, but we also have received horses from the AZ Dept of Agriculture and from persons who can no longer care for their ex-racehorse.

Since these horses were bred for athleticism, heart, and intelligence they are still very athletic and are excelling in other disciplines. They just need a chance to find that second career and a new home … “after the homestretch."

Ruling year info

2011

President

Dannielle Marturana

Vice President

Susan Hayes

Main address

1328 E Maddock Road

Phoenix, AZ 85086 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

45-2897060

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The need to find homes for horses retiring off the race track is great. After The Homestretch-Arizona was formed to fill this niche.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Rescue, Rehab, Retrain, Re-home

Our programs are concentrated in the areas of 1) Rescue: from the local track, from Dept of Agriculture if found wandering in the desert, 2) Rehab:  rest the horses, wean them off of hot feed, tend to any injuries, 3) Retrain:  match horses' abilities with local trainers, 4) Re-home:  adopt horses to non-racing homes by way of social media pairing them with perfect, prospective adopters.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Rescue, Rehab, Retrain, Re-home

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our herd averages 17-19 horses in any given month. As each horse is adopted, we add another horse into our herd. As of December 2021 we have rescued 98 horses and adopted out 74.

Number of animals rehabilitated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Rescue, Rehab, Retrain, Re-home

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Recovery from starvation, ulcers, laminitis, cancer lesions, colic, cellulitis, nerve damage, wobbler symptoms, ligament, tendon, knee, joint and hoof injuries are what we successfully treat.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Rescue, Rehab, Retrain, Re-home

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As of December 2019 we have adopted out 59 horses.

Number of animals rehomed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Rescue, Rehab, Retrain, Re-home

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To be financially healthy to maintain our herd of 17-19 horses.
To have a strong and diversified Board to make intelligent decisions regarding our organization and our equines.
To be an asset to our community and address the need for rehabbing, re-training and re-homing Arizona's former racehorses.
To be attentive to our volunteers and keep them safe and happy.
To find good trainers for our horses.
To find good, adoptive homes for our horses.
We ALWAYS take back a horse should a life-situation happens that requires us doing so. We will then reassess the horse and ready it for a new home.

To keep our accreditation with the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance. To keep our Platinum status with GuideStar to assure the community we are honest and transparent financially. To be financially healthy we diversify our funding in the areas of fundraisers, donors, and grants. To maintain a knowledgeable and health board with capable, diversified individuals. We assess each request for a horse to enter our program to make sure it is a real need and rely on veterinarians and other experts to make sure each horse has a quality of life ahead of it and not prolong suffering. We have an adoption process that includes checking up on references, home visits, watching the interaction between the prospective adopter and horse and we rely on our trainer and veterinarian to make sure there is a match between what the horse is capable of and wants to do and what the person is looking for in a horse.

Currently we can afford to continue to feed, provide hoof and regular veterinarian visits as well as other therapies (chiropractor, acupuncture, etc.) to get our herd of 18 horses healthy and sound. Our volunteer base is solid and growing and to ensure we have enough people to care for the horses throughout the day.
We have a good reputation with large organizations who issue grants: Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance, Thoroughbred Charities of America, Arizona Community Foundation, ASPCA, One Horse At A Time, One Last Race, CARMA, and Heath-Miller Memorial Foundation.
Our Board Members are diversified: Michele Anderson-Charney has extensive knowledge in the financial industry, Liz Ott has experience with grant writing and funding, and Dannielle Marturana who retired from the Arizona school system, having taught high school business and has over 14 years of experience volunteering with horse rescues. Each board member has extensive history caring for and working with horses.

As of the middle of March, 2018, After The Homestretch has taken in 61 horses and adopted out 42 of them. Our current herd has 19 horses, 9 of which are trained, rideable and ready to be adopted. Two other horses are sound and ready to be adopted as companion-only horses. The remaining herd is rehabbing and will enter training when they are rested and sound.

After The Homestretch has a new, permanent home. We purchased a 5-acre ranch in the North Phoenix/Desert Hills area in October of 2017. All of our horses are at this location. We maintain our ranch with the help of over 50 volunteers.

Our Board of Directors contains 3 strong, dedicated and vibrant members. We have an Advisory Council consisting of our Veterinarian, Dr. Stacey Sicker ( Carefree Equine Veterinary Services), our Alternative Medicine Specialist, Kim Drangsland (Knowledge in Motion), and trainer, Laurette Harris (Four Reel Farms).

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

AFTER THE HOMESTRETCH-ARIZONA
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AFTER THE HOMESTRETCH-ARIZONA

Board of directors
as of 09/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Dannielle Marturana

No Affiliation

Term: 2011 -


Board co-chair

Susan Hayes

Dannielle Marturana

Retired-Phoenix Union High School

Susan Hayes

Business Owner

Beth Laster

Business Owner

Jennifer Johnson

Marketing

Tony Janes

Financial

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/22/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

No data

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data