Educational Institutions

Partnership 4 Kids

  • Omaha, NE
  • www.p4k.org

Mission Statement

Partnership 4 Kids is a goal setting and group mentoring program that builds hope for under-served students and helps them create a foundation for success from kindergarten to careers.

It is also our belief that Partnership 4 Kids is strengthening the community through our network of partnerships with Omaha schools, local businesses and individuals as well as our collaborating partner programs. We are all collaborating to transform the future of Omaha through educational advancement and student success.

Currently there are more than 5,400 students in 22 Omaha Public Schools and a variety of post-secondary institutions who are participating in Partnership programs.

Main Programs

  1. Elementary Goal Setting Program
  2. Middle and High School Group Mentoring Program
Service Areas

Self-reported

Nebraska

Omaha, NE

68102

68104

68105

68106

68107

68110

68111

68112

68132

68144

ruling year

1993

Principal Officer

Self-reported

Deb Denbeck

Keywords

Self-reported

mentoring, group mentoring, goal setting, family involvement, life skills, academic achievement and support, career exploration, service learning, college access, scholarships

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Also Known As

The Partnership For Our Kids

EIN

47-0762798

 Number

2376405997

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

The primary focus of Partnership 4 Kids (P4K) is to provide low-income and at-risk students with continuous program support and caring adult role-models to guide them on a pathway of academic achievement and preparedness to succeed in the 21st century workforce. To achieve this, P4K relies on the commitment of 415 community volunteers, serving as mentors and role models for the agency's 5,400 student participants.

These consistent mentoring relationships, coupled with early interventions that harness the power of school engagement, goal achievement, and college and career exploration, P4K is uplifting students living in poverty, restoring their confidence in their own abilities to excel, motivating them to graduate from high school and to pursue some type of post-secondary education.

Agency program results such as the standardized test results of P4K elementary schools increasing faster than non-P4K schools; middle and high school students missing fewer days of school than their non-P4K peers; a 95% high school graduation rate; and an 87% persistence rate among P4K's college students, are proof positive of the significant impact the agency is making on Omaha's low-income youth.

In addition to positive academic strides, P4K students also show higher levels of school engagement, which is associated with lower likelihood of participating in risky behaviors such as drug and alcohol use (ChildTrends, Oct. 2008).

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Elementary Goal Setting Program

For grades K-6, P4K implements its goal setting program on a school-wide basis at 12 Title I elementary schools in Omaha. Every student attending one of P4K's 12 target elementary schools is automatically enrolled in the program. While the value of setting and achieving goals is taught at every stage of programming, basic goal setting skills are emphasized starting in elementary school. P4K also offers a Book Buddy program focused on early childhood reading readiness in half of these elementary schools.

Elementary school programming takes place in the classroom during the school day. Teachers set quarterly goals for students that coincide with their school's grading system. Twice per quarter, community volunteers visit students in their classrooms and motivate them to achieve their goals in math, reading, and life skills. Students are recognized for their achievements at quarterly celebrations where medals are awarded for completion of academic goals. Students who meet both academic and life skills goals are entered into drawings for educational prizes. P4K also awards incentives to elementary school classrooms with 80% or more students meeting their academic goals. Family participation is key to program success. Parents are encouraged to attend quarterly celebrations and parent-teacher conferences. Participating parents are eligible for family prize drawings and receive recognition awards.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Children Only (5 - 14 years)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

Program 2

Middle and High School Group Mentoring Program

P4K's middle school and high school programming takes a group mentoring format. Volunteer group mentors each engage with three to four students in a classroom setting three times per month after school for an hour and a half. P4K program coordinators facilitate sessions using research-based curriculum focused on nine required workshops at each grade level that are designed to help students develop a sense of responsibility, higher self-esteem, initiative, creativity, leadership, and pride. At every third meeting of the month, mentor/mentee groups participate in real-world applications of the material covered during the meetings with offsite activities facilitated in collaboration with community partners. Outside of the scheduled meetings, mentors make weekly contact with each student to check in on their progress and needs.

P4K program staff works with 10th grade students to make an intentional transition into one of 20 partner programs who provide specialized mentoring and college preparatory services. Through this alliance of programs, P4K eliminates the duplication of services and strengthens its efforts by increasing cross-agency resources. These students receive continued P4K case management and are eligible to apply for a P4K college scholarship upon high school graduation.

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Youth/Adolescents only (14 - 19 years)

Budget

Results

Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

1. Number of volunteers

Target Population
K-12 (5-19 years), At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

2. Number of students who perform at average or above on standardized testing

Target Population
Children and youth (0-19 years), At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Connected to a Program?
Elementary Goal Setting Program
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Percentage of students performing at or above proficiency in state reading tests.

3. Rate of student attendance during the reporting period

Target Population
K-12 (5-19 years), At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Days fewer that P4K students missed of school than comparison students

4. Number of program participants who receive a secondary school diploma or GED

Target Population
K-12 (5-19 years), At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Connected to a Program?
Middle and High School Group Mentoring Program
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

5. Number of entrance scholarships and awards and exit scholarships

Target Population
Adolescents (13-19 years), At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Connected to a Program?
n/a
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric

6. Number of participants who felt that they have been provided with a range of options for future employment

Target Population
Adolescents (13-19 years), At-risk youth, Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Connected to a Program?
Middle and High School Group Mentoring Program
TOTALS BY YEAR
Context notes for this metric
Percentage of students expressing more career knowledge than before attending a P4K summer workshop

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    The primary goals that guide all of P4K's programming efforts are:

    Goal 1: To empower students to succeed through goal setting, life skills education and service learning projects.

    Goal 2: To strengthen families by encouraging involvement in their student's education.

    Goal 3: To provide more volunteer opportunities for volunteers to help improve public education.

    Goal 4: To increase high school graduation and college enrollment rates through academic support and scholarships.

    Goal 5: To evaluate program outcomes to determine agency enrollment effectiveness.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Strategies to empower students to succeed:
    *Elementary students are asked to work towards the achievement of individualized quarterly academic and life skills goals with the monthly support of volunteer mentors, called Goal Buddies.

    *Implementation of strengths based leadership-development curriculum that grows personal strengths and reinforces skills students need to be successful.

    Strategies to strengthen families engagement:
    *P4K elementary school parents are encouraged to chanting the parent motto, “I am committed to my child's education from kindergarten to college".

    *P4K provides families with regular updates about programming; resources and opportunities available to them, and informational sessions on how to support their children during crucial academic transitions.

    Strategies to provide more volunteer opportunities for volunteers to help improve public education:
    *P4K enlists the support of 415 volunteers to provide student participants with mentor support, motivation and encouragement.

    Strategies to increase high school graduation and college enrollment rates:
    *A minimum of 11 local and regional college campus visits are offered between 4th and 10th grade.

    *ACT prep classes are offered in 10th grade

    *Regular case management sessions with P4K staff who provide resources to eliminate barriers to academic and personal success.

    *Regular after school meetings with curriculum designed to prepare students for high school graduation, college application processes, college acceptance and graduation.

    *Career tours and workshops offered to participants, beginning in 5th grade

    *Renewable college scholarships are offered through the agency's scholarship endowment

    Strategies to evaluate program outcomes and determine agency effectiveness:
    *Data analysis results are separately categorized between program impact outcomes and program quality outcomes.

    *All data is analyzed toward moving outcomes forward for participating students

    *All participants are surveyed and responses are analyzed for program improvement needs.

  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    The agency has been serving at-risk youth populations for 27 years and employs a professional staff with a collective of more than 250 years of experience working with low-income populations, more than 50 years prior teaching experience, and countless hours of continuing education in youth service.

    P4K's staff, board, and partners are working together to implement a four-year strategic plan to assure adequate resources to sustain the agency and deliver the highest quality of service as P4K programming expands to meet demands. P4K has enhanced its strategic recruitment efforts to ensure it has enough high quality and dedicated mentors and volunteers, maintaining retention rates at 80% by engaging volunteers, advocates, and donors through quarterly update meetings. P4K is also building a strategy to attract young professional mentors and developing an employer-based strategy for volunteer recruitment, aligning this strategy with board member recruitment and corporate fundraising. P4K's staff and board are implementing professional development programs necessary for succession planning, allowing staff to grow and facilitating staff engagement in the community.

    Additionally, P4K partners with over 20 specialized mentoring and college preparatory programs to eliminate the duplication of services and strengthen efforts by increasing cross-agency resources available to participating students.

    A long-term funding strategy with an intentional approach to attract new donors, diversify and expand the donor base, and secure more grant funding to ensure long-term financial sustainability is also being implemented.

    Finally, the agency is maximizing resources, including in-kind donations, to drive agency efficiencies, impact, and overall sustainability.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    *Middle and high school students will miss 2 or fewer days of school per quarter

    *Students will attend 75% or more (per school year) of their scheduled P4K after- school program meetings.

    *All middle and high school students will have a C grade or above in math and English

    *80% of P4K elementary students (classrooms) will achieve at least 2 of 3 goals each quarter

    *By formal program completion (10th grade) students will:
    -be successfully promoted to the 11th grade
    -be accepted into at least 1 P4K Partner Program
    -have visited 11 college campuses
    -completed sufficient credits to date and are on track graduate from high school in 4 years
    -have participated in ACT prep classes
    -have a connection with at least 1 positive adult (mentor/ Goal Buddy/P4K staff) outside their family

    *P4K will maintain a 4-year high school graduation rate of 95% or higher among student participants

  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    Book Buddy Reading Readiness Program has been implemented in 5 of 12 P4K target elementary schools

    90% of P4K middle and high school students remain on track to graduate from high school in four years through intense case management with P4K staff and mentor engagement.

    Due to the mentoring support nearly 600 P4K middle and high school students receive through program participation, they are more likely to remain in school. Furthermore, research has also found that students who are involved in a mentoring relationship are 55% more likely to attend college.

    P4K provides college funding to 105 students (current year) with the projection of 200 students in 2017-2018.

    1503 parents in attendance at P4K events during the 2015-2016 school year.

    87% of P4K students averaged 2 or fewer absences per quarter for the entire school year.

    P4K middle and high school students have maintained an average GPA of 3.1 or higher during the previous two school years.

    P4K students exhibited higher levels of affective, behavioral and cognitive engagement in their own learning process, including persistence toward graduation, than did demographically similar students in their own schools. (OPS Student Engagement and School Climate Survey-2015)

    P4K provides college funding to 105 students (current year) with the projection of 200 students in 2017-2018.

    87% of P4K college students renewed their scholarships for the 2016-2017 school year.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Nebraska

Omaha, NE

68102

68104

68105

68106

68107

68110

68111

68112

68132

68144

Social Media

Blog

Funding Needs

General Operating Transportation Program Capacity Building

photos





External Reviews

Source: greatnonprofits.org

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

PARTNERSHIP 4 KIDS INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2015 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Partnership 4 Kids

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2015, 2015 and 2014
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Principal Officer

Deb Denbeck

BIO

Deb Denbeck is president of Partnership 4 Kids and oversees the operations of the agency as a whole. Prior to coming to the P4K, she served as the director of philanthropy at Creighton University for five years, served as a collegiate volleyball coach for 21 years, an athletic director at Southwest Minnesota State University, and an associate athletic director at UNO.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Dr. Ward A. Chambers

University of Nebraska Medical Center

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?


ORGANIZATIONAL DEMOGRAPHICS

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

Gender
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Volunteers.
Race & Ethnicity
This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members and Volunteers.
Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Diversity Strategies
No
We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
No
We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
No
We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
No
We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
No
We have a diversity committee in place
No
We have a diversity manager in place
No
We have a diversity plan
No
We use other methods to support diversity