Human Services

WEST END NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE INC

  • Wilmington, DE
  • www.westendnh.org

Mission Statement

To help individuals achieve self-sufficiency, reach and maintain their maximum potential, and live responsibly and harmoniously in a complex world.

Main Programs

  1. Launcher Entrepreneurship Training
  2. Financial Empowerment Services
  3. After School and Summer Prevention Programming
  4. Adult Education & Employment
  5. Services for Former Foster Care Youth (Life Lines)
Service Areas

Self-reported

Delaware

West End Neighborhood House, Inc. provides services throughout the state of Delaware, with a concentration on New Castle County and the City of Wilmington.

ruling year

1950

Executive Director

Self-reported

Mr. Paul F. Calistro Jr.

Keywords

Self-reported

Youth, Self-Sufficiency, Education, Employment, Community Development

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Also Known As

West End

EIN

51-0064301

 Number

6561774594

Physical Address

710 N. Lincoln St.

Wilmington, DE 19805

Contact

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Programs + Results

How does this organization make a difference?

Overview

Self-reported by organization

West End's programs all seek to strengthen customers' ability to become self-sufficient. For example, customers become more economically self-sufficient by better managing their finances; more occupationally self-sufficient by learning how to secure and maintain employment; more educationally self-sufficient by completing a GED, college degree or technical certification; and more emotionally self-sufficient by learning how to acceptably resolve conflict, work with peers, and build social relationships; and more physically self-sufficient by engaging in regular exercise and making healthy food choices.

Programs

Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

Launcher Entrepreneurship Training

In 2017, West End created an entrepreneurship program focused on educating aspiring entrepreneurs on the fundamentals of starting their own businesses and helping existing businesses expand. The program is based on four primary components: (1) business training, including classroom instruction and one-on-one mentoring focused on the basic elements of starting a business; (2) business support, such as topic-specific workshops taught by local experts; (3) loans/access to credit, provided by local Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI); (4) business incubators – shared office and workspace to reduce costs and facilitate collaboration.

Category

Employment

Population(s) Served

Adults

Budget

$305,000

Program 2

Financial Empowerment Services

Security Deposit Loan Program - offers affordable, low interest grants and loans of up to $975 for security deposits on rental units. Each customer is provided with case management for the duration of the loan, as well as credit review and budget assistance. Loans are offered statewide through M&T Bank and assist in credit establishment and repair.

Loans Plus - offers an alternative to predatory payday lending by allowing individuals to borrow up to $500 at a safe, affordable interest rate using similar documentation and criteria as payday lenders. Loans are offered through M&T Bank and help customers establish and repair credit while avoiding predatory loans. Loans are offered statewide through partnership with the $tand By Me Program.

$tand By Me Financial Coaching - West End offers free personal financial coaching to individuals in New Castle County at locations including: Delaware Technical and Community College, Wilmington University, West End Neighborhood House, the Hudson State Service Center, and Christiana Care Health Services. Financial Coaches provide one-on-one assistance with all areas of personal finance including budgeting, savings, credit review and repair, debt management, as well as financial aid planning and tax preparation.

Kiss Your Landlord Goodbye (Pre-Housing Counseling) – a component of the $tand by Me Program, Kiss Your Landord Goodbye is an initiative of the Delaware State Housing Authority that connects participants to competitive mortgage rates and flexible lending criteria, and offers downpayment and settlement assistance to first-time, current or past homeowners. After working with a coach to become mortgage ready, $tand By Me refers customers to housing counselors who walk them through the purchase process step-by-step.

Crisis Alleviation - Emergency food and financial assistance (as available) to provide basic necessities and/or avoid utility shut-off or eviction.

Category

Human Services

Population(s) Served

Adults

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$779,563

Program 3

After School and Summer Prevention Programming

West End’s After School and Prevention Programming for grades K-12 (ages 6-18), utilizes evidence-based models to reduce risky behaviors linked to teen pregnancy, alcohol and drug use, violence, and suicide via a host of supportive services and activities:

Education: Homework help, PSAT/SAT preparation, technology enrichment, career exploration, and one-on-one and small group tutoring to help students work toward a clearly defined academic goal. Staff also work in conjunction with parents, teachers, and guidance counselors to create study plans, explore behavior modification tools, and identify other support services needed to ensure academic success.

Mental Health & Wellness Services: Counseling, peer-to-peer groups, and other empowering activities to support youth and their families. Activities include conflict resolution, the development of protective factors, risk avoidance, and other social and emotional issues that affect adolescents.

Health & Sexuality Education: Group sessions on topics such as healthy relationships, nutrition through healthy food choices, body image, gender-identity, and sexual and reproductive health.

Sports & Recreation: Team and individual sports are played daily and structured so that everyone participates without feeling uncomfortable about their skill level. Popular activates include video gaming, flag football, volleyball, kickball, basketball, track & field, and cross-country.

Field Trips & Special Guests: Field trips include local plays, museums, nature reserves, zoos, rock climbing, hiking, sporting events, and more. Throughout the year, special guests visit the program to give talks and hands-on demonstrations for youth. Special guests in the past have included representatives from CreativeVision Factory, the Delaware Shakespeare Festival, Delaware Nature Society, Paws for People, Spatulearn, local painters and artisans, wild animal rescues, police K9, poets, musicians, and magicians to name a few.

Summer Camp: Camp West serves youth ages 5-12 and is filled with the perfect blend of Education, Sports, and Fun. Activities enable campers to develop and apply problem-solving skills, gain exposure to the arts, build teamwork skills, create friendships, practice using technology, experience the natural world, meet special guests, attend field trips, and so much more. Our team of dedicated and well-trained professionals works year-round to ensure that our camp programs are fresh, creative and exciting.

Delaware Prevention Coalition: DPC is a program designed to discourage, prevent and/or reduce the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. Youth Prevention Frontliner Groups (ages 13-17) enable youth to learn about the perils of underage drinking and the use of other dangerous substances. Groups encourage positive behaviors & risk-avoidance skills, self-esteem, leadership, and healthy decision-making. Youth also build leadership skills through planning the annual Teen Summit event.

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Children and Youth (infants - 19 years.)

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$1,026,384

Program 4

Adult Education & Employment

West End provides training courses for the unemployed, underemployed and those who lack a high school diploma or GED. Services are designed to help individuals build the critical thinking skills necessary to enhance employability, gain and retain employment, increase literacy, and transition participants to post-secondary education or advanced training.

Education & Employment programming serves individuals ages 16 and older at all career and educational levels. Services are unique, tailored to the individual:

Adult Education Services Include:
Basic reading and math classes and testing (for those who test below the 9th grade level); GED® preparation classes and testing (for those who test between a 9th and 12th grade level); tutorial services and study skills training.

Adult Employment Services Include:
Work-readiness workshops (including resume and cover letter writing, interviewing techniques, and soft skills training); individual career exploration and coaching; internship and job shadowing opportunities; nationally recognized credential training in customer service; partnership with Delaware Tech to provide free post-secondary credential training through the Environmental Job Training Program (city of Wilmington residents only); job placement and retention assistance

Case Management Services Include: counseling to address obstacles to goal attainment; support services for transitioning to college, advanced training, and the military; leadership development and life skills activities

Category

Education

Population(s) Served

Adults

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$713,093

Program 5

Services for Former Foster Care Youth (Life Lines)

The Life Lines Program was developed between 2000 and 2001 by specialists in the areas of housing and foster care issues to improve the quality of life for emancipated foster care youth by providing: housing, case management, counseling, financial, educational and employment support services to compliment their own efforts in transitioning to healthy, independent adult living. Life Lines is divided into three sub-categories: Transitional Housing, Permanent Housing and Independent Living.

The Transitional Housing Program serves former foster care youth statewide and is the only provider of transitional housing services for this population in Delaware. We have 5 town homes in a cluster site, located on the 1600 block of West 8th Street (1621, 1623, 1627, 1631, and 1633) with a capacity to accommodate 11 youth. Each dwelling is fully furnished, including dishware and cooking utensils, bed and bath linens, and household décor. The program conducts an assessment on each youth to determine what they will need to become completely self-sufficient and provides ancillary services (see below) to facilitate the process. A detailed individualized case plan is developed and specific goals are established. Participants gain autonomy and receive incentives for their achievements as each goal is met. When youth complete the program, they are provided with furnishings for their first apartment.

The Permanent Housing Program serves youth between the ages of 18 to 23 (at time of entry) who, in addition to being former foster care youth, also suffer from at least one severe diagnosable mental health disorder. This program can accommodate 11 youth in apartments located in a cluster site. The Permanent Housing Program has a much smaller client to staff ratio and provides supervision almost 24 hours per day. The focus is generally the same as the Transitional Housing Program, though with the understanding that, due to the severity of their disabilities, some youth will never be capable of achieving complete independence. Youth may remain in the program as long as they are compliant and work toward their goals.

The Independent Living Program serves youth between the ages of 16-21. The primary focus of this program is to ensure safe placement, coordinate quality services, teach life skills, and prepare youth to age out of the system by age 18. The program advocates for underage youth, and works with their foster parents, state workers, teachers, guidance counselors, and the courts. The program also serves youth between 18-21 years of age, who reside throughout New Castle County. Staff visits youth at home to assist with educational enrollment, vocational training, coordinate health care services, etc.

Category

Youth Development

Population(s) Served

Poor/Economically Disadvantaged, Indigent, General

Budget

$918,858

Charting Impact

Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

  1. What is the organization aiming to accomplish?
    West End's goal is for its customers to achieve ultimate self-sufficiency.
  2. What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?
    Strategies for helping customers reach self-sufficiency include training and support in the following areas:

    Educational support to prepare students for the GED exam

    Academic tutoring and other support to youth in grades K-12 so that they stay in school and ultimately graduate

    Prevention-based after school and summer extracurricular activities to keep youth safe from harm and negative community influences, teach positive peer interaction and build social networks

    Job search, placement, internship opportunities and employment preparation support to help customers find and maintain employment

    Entrepreneurship training to educate aspiring local business owners on the basics of creating their own company

    Housing, life skills, and case management assistance to former foster care youth to prepare them for adulthood

    Financial coaching in budgeting, credit establishment/improvement, debt reduction and saving

    Low interest loans for security deposits and as an alternative to payday lenders to help customers establish credit
  3. What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?
    Physical Capacity: West End owns 10 houses on Dupont and 8th Streets in Wilmington, as well as its 25,000 + square foot main facility located at 710 N. Lincoln St., which provides office space for 62 staff members and classroom space for after school and educational activities. The agency also owns a Presbyterian Church building on West 8 St. (a block away from its main facility), as well as two 15-passenger vans, two eight-passenger mini-vans, a mini school bus and a Ford Fusion sedan. West End also has three computer labs with over 30 computers.

    Experience Managing State & Federal Funds: West End has significant experience managing state and federal contracts. Sources of support include: the U.S. Depts. Of Housing & Urban Dev., Labor (previously the U.S. Office of Adolescent Health), Delaware's Departments of Labor, Education & Children, Youth and Their Families, Delaware State Housing Authority, as well as the Offices of Public Health and Childcare Licensing. All of these agreements involve rigorous monitoring, data collection, reporting and analysis.

    West End Neighborhood House is currently managing more than 10 state and federal contracts with a combined total annual value of over $2.5 million. These contracts serve West End's customers in a variety of areas including: violence and suicide prevention; after-school educational activities; housing assistance and relocation; adult basic education; and workforce development. West End's compliance with work plans, schedules, terms and conditions of federal and state contracts has been exemplary. In fact, West End was recognized for outstanding implementation of the federally funded Positive Pathways (P3) Mentoring Program by the Mid-Atlantic Network of Youth & Family Services (MANY).

    Financial Capacity: With an annual operating budget of nearly $4,000,000, West End has succeeded in capping its management costs at below 15% for over 15 years - a hallmark of effective administration. The agency enjoys a diversified funding stream that includes federal, state and local grants; program and management fees, interest payments and individual contributions; corporate and private support; as well as grants from foundations. West End also has a generous line of credit and a small endowment fund that helps provide a very modest sum to supplement annual operating costs.

    In addition to the foregoing, in the last 15 years, West End has helped generate nearly 60 million dollars in capital funds that were used for renovations and newly constructed homes targeting low to moderate income families. This infusion of capital has generated private investment and resulted in the revitalization of three neighborhoods in the City of Wilmington. In that same period, more than 390 units of housing have been developed for very low to moderate income families.
  4. How will they know if they are making progress?
    Progress is tracked in several key program areas, including: Education, Employment, Housing, Financial Empowerment, Health & Wellness and Community Development. Indicators include:

    EDUCATION
    Advancing a grade or educational level
    Earning a GED, High School Diploma, College Degree

    EMPLOYMENT
    Finding a job
    Completing a work-related certification

    HOUSING
    Securing safe, stable housing
    Purchasing a home

    FINANCIAL EMPOWERMENT
    Establishing/improving credit
    Increasing earnings or savings/reducing debt
    Creating and following a personal/household budget

    HEALTH & WELLNESS
    # of youth engaged in an average of 30 minutes of daily exercise

    COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
    Jobs created in the community
    Businesses created or expanded
    Overall dollars invested in the community

  5. What have and haven't they accomplished so far?
    In the early 1990s, West End, in collaboration with St. Francis Hospital, created a model prenatal clinic (Tiny Steps) to address infant mortality in low income families. St. Francis made the program permanent, and the Federal Government adopted and replicated the program nationwide.

    In 1993, to encourage community home ownership, West End created a security deposit loan program that to date has provided more than $2 million in financing to low income clients.

    Since the late 1990s, West End helped raise nearly $60 million in capital to renovate, construct and sell nearly 400 new homes to low and moderate income families to address vacant property blight and encourage home ownership: in sixteen years, only two owners have defaulted on their mortgages.

    Since 2001, WENH has led the state and impacted the nation in creating transitional and permanent housing, employment training and mentoring for youth who have been emancipated from foster care at age 18. Today, approx. 25% of Delaware's foster care youth participate in West End's programs designed to help them become self-sufficient.

    In 2005, to combat predatory payday loans that trap low-income customers in debt, West End created an innovative short term loan program (Loans Plus) that allows customers to borrow up to $500 for payback over three months. The program has been so successful that the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) adopted it in 25 states.

    In 2011, West End led the creation of West Side Grows Together, a 10-year $35 million Revitalization Plan to transform housing, employment, the physical landscape and social condition of Wilmington's West Side. The Plan's target area covers one square mile, a population of over 13,000, and includes one of the city's most economically, ethnically and socially diverse communities.

    In 2014, in collaboration with Sir Speedy Print and Marketing Services of Wilmington, West End launched Popdot, a sign creation and installation business that employs foster care and other disadvantaged youth, at least 75% of whom are low-income.

    Also in 2014, West End expanded its Cool Spring Farmer's Market into an urban agricultural program which now delivers locally grown produce to several locations in and around Wilmington, including low and mixed-income communities.

    In 2016, West End created an entrepreneurship program focused on educating aspiring entrepreneurs on the fundamentals of starting their own businesses and helping existing businesses expand. The program is based on four primary components: (1) business training, including classroom instruction and one-on-one mentoring focused on the basic elements of starting a business; (2) business support, such as topic-specific workshops taught by local experts; (3) loans/access to credit, provided by a local Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI); (4) business incubators – shared office and workspace to reduce costs and facilitate collaboration.
Service Areas

Self-reported

Delaware

West End Neighborhood House, Inc. provides services throughout the state of Delaware, with a concentration on New Castle County and the City of Wilmington.

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Financials

Financial information is an important part of gauging the short- and long-term health of the organization.

WEST END NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE INC
Fiscal year: Jan 01-Dec 31
Yes, financials were audited by an independent accountant.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

WEST END NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE INC

Leadership

NEED MORE INFO ON THIS NONPROFIT?

Free: Gain immediate access to the following:
  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2014, 2013 and 2012
  • Board Chair and Board Members
  • Access to the GuideStar Community
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Executive Director

Mr. Paul F. Calistro Jr.

Governance

BOARD CHAIR

Mr. Clint Walker

BarclaycardUS

Term: June 2015 - June 2018

BOARD LEADERSHIP PRACTICES

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices. Self-reported by organization

Yes

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?


RESPONSE NOT PROVIDED

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?